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Workgroup to Domain

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Anonymous
June 7, 2005 3:03:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I have just started with a new company that has a W2k server in a
peer-to-peer setup - i.e. workgroup, no domain. I'd like to convince the
ptb's that upping this server to a domain controller would increase security
and ease management. Can anyone point me to the best practice 'how-to' so I
can plan and accomplish this safely?

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More about : workgroup domain

Anonymous
June 7, 2005 3:03:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Moving to a domain is definitely the way to go if your company has more
than a handful of PC's. I recently had to migrate a 30 user workgroup
to a domain, all went very smoothly with the migration.

Are you planning on directly upgrading the existing server to a DC? It
might be smoother to get a new server and then have your existing
server as a member server or promote it as a second DC for once you
have migrated everyone else over.

One utility i found extremely useful was this
http://www.forensit.com/Profwiz/index.htm
once I had moved their PC onto the domain, this allowed their domain
user profile to use their existing workgroup profiles thus keeping
everything looking in the same way it had before - stops them from
complaining & you having to tweak each individuals settings!

Easiest way is:

Set up your DC & user accounts on this DC.
Make the PCs (&possibly member server) members of the domain.
Run the profile wizard for your users so they keep existing settings
and you aren't running around setting up connections to your email
server etc.
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 8:58:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

There are 8 pc's/users in the workgroup, and we don't want to spend on a new
server, so upgrade is the way I'm looking to go. Any tips/guidance would be
gratefully accepted.

<not_active2004@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118155531.951138.5960@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Moving to a domain is definitely the way to go if your company has more
> than a handful of PC's. I recently had to migrate a 30 user workgroup
> to a domain, all went very smoothly with the migration.
>
> Are you planning on directly upgrading the existing server to a DC? It
> might be smoother to get a new server and then have your existing
> server as a member server or promote it as a second DC for once you
> have migrated everyone else over.
>
> One utility i found extremely useful was this
> http://www.forensit.com/Profwiz/index.htm
> once I had moved their PC onto the domain, this allowed their domain
> user profile to use their existing workgroup profiles thus keeping
> everything looking in the same way it had before - stops them from
> complaining & you having to tweak each individuals settings!
>
> Easiest way is:
>
> Set up your DC & user accounts on this DC.
> Make the PCs (&possibly member server) members of the domain.
> Run the profile wizard for your users so they keep existing settings
> and you aren't running around setting up connections to your email
> server etc.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 6:49:15 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Ok so you are going to carry out an in place upgrade.

First of all warn people that they may have problems accessing the
server on the day you carry out the task - I assume it is being used as
a file store, backup etc but not much else?

On the server run dcpromo, this will create the domain environment and
configure DNS on the server. AD integrated zones are the best way to
go. Remember to set up forwarders to your ISPs DNS servers.

Once DNS & AD are created and configured, install and configure DHCP.
Also create the user accounts in AD, set up logon scripts etc.

On a PC, log in as local administrator. Set the PC to get IP and DNS
settings from DHCP(if they are getting DHCP settings already from
another source, disable this DHCP and run a release/renew). Join this
PC to the domain. Once the PC is a domain member log in as domain
administrator and use the profile wizard I mentioned yesterday to
migrate the local users profile for the new domain account set up for
the user. Now log in with the domain users account and test everything
still works. Make notes of anything that does not work so you can fix
it on the other PCs - I had no issues.

Assuming all is well repeat for the remaining PCs.

Assuming you have all w2k /xp workstations then you should have no
bother at all. Running dcpromom is a piece of cake provided you can
configure DNS correctly - make sure you can do this before you start.





Alan C wrote:
> There are 8 pc's/users in the workgroup, and we don't want to spend on a new
> server, so upgrade is the way I'm looking to go. Any tips/guidance would be
> gratefully accepted.
>
> <not_active2004@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1118155531.951138.5960@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> > Moving to a domain is definitely the way to go if your company has more
> > than a handful of PC's. I recently had to migrate a 30 user workgroup
> > to a domain, all went very smoothly with the migration.
> >
> > Are you planning on directly upgrading the existing server to a DC? It
> > might be smoother to get a new server and then have your existing
> > server as a member server or promote it as a second DC for once you
> > have migrated everyone else over.
> >
> > One utility i found extremely useful was this
> > http://www.forensit.com/Profwiz/index.htm
> > once I had moved their PC onto the domain, this allowed their domain
> > user profile to use their existing workgroup profiles thus keeping
> > everything looking in the same way it had before - stops them from
> > complaining & you having to tweak each individuals settings!
> >
> > Easiest way is:
> >
> > Set up your DC & user accounts on this DC.
> > Make the PCs (&possibly member server) members of the domain.
> > Run the profile wizard for your users so they keep existing settings
> > and you aren't running around setting up connections to your email
> > server etc.
> >
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 5:10:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Many, many thanks.

<not_active2004@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118224155.577847.253060@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Ok so you are going to carry out an in place upgrade.
>
> First of all warn people that they may have problems accessing the
> server on the day you carry out the task - I assume it is being used as
> a file store, backup etc but not much else?
>
> On the server run dcpromo, this will create the domain environment and
> configure DNS on the server. AD integrated zones are the best way to
> go. Remember to set up forwarders to your ISPs DNS servers.
>
> Once DNS & AD are created and configured, install and configure DHCP.
> Also create the user accounts in AD, set up logon scripts etc.
>
> On a PC, log in as local administrator. Set the PC to get IP and DNS
> settings from DHCP(if they are getting DHCP settings already from
> another source, disable this DHCP and run a release/renew). Join this
> PC to the domain. Once the PC is a domain member log in as domain
> administrator and use the profile wizard I mentioned yesterday to
> migrate the local users profile for the new domain account set up for
> the user. Now log in with the domain users account and test everything
> still works. Make notes of anything that does not work so you can fix
> it on the other PCs - I had no issues.
>
> Assuming all is well repeat for the remaining PCs.
>
> Assuming you have all w2k /xp workstations then you should have no
> bother at all. Running dcpromom is a piece of cake provided you can
> configure DNS correctly - make sure you can do this before you start.
>
>
>
>
>
> Alan C wrote:
>> There are 8 pc's/users in the workgroup, and we don't want to spend on a
>> new
>> server, so upgrade is the way I'm looking to go. Any tips/guidance would
>> be
>> gratefully accepted.
>>
>> <not_active2004@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:1118155531.951138.5960@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>> > Moving to a domain is definitely the way to go if your company has more
>> > than a handful of PC's. I recently had to migrate a 30 user workgroup
>> > to a domain, all went very smoothly with the migration.
>> >
>> > Are you planning on directly upgrading the existing server to a DC? It
>> > might be smoother to get a new server and then have your existing
>> > server as a member server or promote it as a second DC for once you
>> > have migrated everyone else over.
>> >
>> > One utility i found extremely useful was this
>> > http://www.forensit.com/Profwiz/index.htm
>> > once I had moved their PC onto the domain, this allowed their domain
>> > user profile to use their existing workgroup profiles thus keeping
>> > everything looking in the same way it had before - stops them from
>> > complaining & you having to tweak each individuals settings!
>> >
>> > Easiest way is:
>> >
>> > Set up your DC & user accounts on this DC.
>> > Make the PCs (&possibly member server) members of the domain.
>> > Run the profile wizard for your users so they keep existing settings
>> > and you aren't running around setting up connections to your email
>> > server etc.
>> >
>
!