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Has anyone reached 3.6 or 4 GHz with E6600 and air cooling?

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January 1, 2007 5:33:49 PM

Hello and Happy New Year to everyone.


I wanted to know if anyone has reached 3.6 GHz or 4 GHz with a Core 2 Duo E6600 (400 or 450 MHz FSB) with air cooling. Is it nearly imposible?

If so, what system was used? mobo, ram, HSF, number of fans, Vcore, etc...


Oh! I have a rather dummy question. If the ASUS P5B-E has only 1 Chasis fan connector and I want to use a total of 5 Fan where or how can I power them?

That's all! Thanks!
January 1, 2007 7:27:42 PM

I've gotten my E6600 up to 3.6 stable but just a little hotter than I want to run.

I'm using a P5B, 2gb of Corsair XMS2 PC-6400, and cooling with a Zalman 9500.
January 1, 2007 7:40:26 PM

I dont have that cpu but as far as the fans are concerned you can get molex fans or you can buy adapters to convert from molex.
You wont be able to control them from software however if they are not plugged into a fan header.
Related resources
January 1, 2007 7:56:06 PM

Ill give you a word of advice... i would not recommend trying to get a system especially a air cooled system stable at 3.6... the risk/benefit ratio from OC'ing past 3.4 isnt worth it. I have however oc'd a 6600 to 3.7 but hardly stable at times all air cooled. The set up is as follows

evga nvidia 680i mobo

coolermaster stacker case with 4 side fans, a zalman 9700 cpu cooler and 3 other case fans in the front back and top.

Corsair dominator c5d ram at 1066

my vcore was at 1.45 to 1.5

however, to be realistic you should just shoot for 3.4 its stable, safe, and performs great!!
January 1, 2007 8:34:08 PM

what r u talking about.. 3.6 is fine stable unless u wanna keep ur rig for 10 years without upgrading..
January 1, 2007 8:36:42 PM

Why dont you let the op know what your system is then ?
And is that on AIR ?
January 2, 2007 2:04:19 AM

If you know what you are doing and have good mobo, memory, and cooling then 3.6g is not that big of a deal for C2D. To be honest I don't see the point of running at 3.6g so I don't. I just set my multiplier at 11 and my rig runs great at 3g.
January 2, 2007 2:06:38 AM

Where do all of you people get these engineering samples anyway ?
Were they handing them out at the mall when I wasnt looking ?
January 2, 2007 2:44:14 AM

Where I work. That's all I can say.
January 2, 2007 4:42:52 PM

so 3,6GHz is reachable with water cooling system on 6600?
January 2, 2007 6:02:52 PM

With water cooling, you can go over 3.6Ghz
January 2, 2007 6:59:40 PM

Maybe I was just really lucky with my cpu, but 3.6ghz is cake for me on air with the equipment listed in my signature. I run at 3.5ghz because I like the idea of being below 1.4v. 3.6ghz used to be my 24/7 overclock though. And it was easily attainable with a good air cooler.
January 2, 2007 9:53:25 PM

Well, I'm sure it's possible allright.....you read these stories about different E6600 revisions....like the system I've installed for my dad.....he has a E6600 B2 revision. I don't really get it what is so important about this.....also I don't get it why one E6600 overclocks better then the other...like intel is still developing the core while producing it? They still put money into it? Oh well...you have to believe this or not it's up to you. But on with the show.....I choose to buy a E6600 cooled with a Thermalright Ultra 120 cooling block and a Nexus Fan 120MM that runs max at 1100 rpm and only produces 22.8 db running at max what is not nessacary at all because of the good ultra 120 performance (both got many awards >fan for silent running and >Ultra-120 performance)/G.E.I.L. DDR2 800 with cl4-4-4-12 timings on a Asus DH Deluxe. The whole setup was build in an Antec P150 case which is a very good case when it comes to silent and cool performance (it even outperformce its bigger brother the P180 casing when it comes to cpu cooling temperatures. It got one 120mm Fan installed in the back of the case and it can be switched to 3 different speeds. Low Medium and High. I choose to set this fan on low cause of the great performance of the cpu cooling block. To get a little bit more cooling I bought two 92 mm silent antec fans that produce 14 db of noise in low settings......I've switched the upper one to medium performance to get a bit more airflow in the casing. After all this I've turned on the bios AI quiet mode and the system is running perfectly quiet at 3.4GHZ with only a slight low breeze sound....it runs idle at 33degrees celcius. I mean.....will you noticed the difference between 3.4 or 3.6Ghz? I bet you won't. It's only reducing the lifetime of your cpu and this for only 200Mhz difference. If you want to do it to impress...well that also not worth it cause who are you going to impress while so many people did it allready cause they felt the same like you (Mind IF please ;)  )? Unhealthy overclocking it just not the way to go with aircooling and 3.4Ghz is a perfect worth for money overclock with the E6600 if you ask me>>>>SILENT Performance=Comfort computing<<<<. THat's my opinion.
January 2, 2007 10:59:02 PM

Quote:
I don't get it why one E6600 overclocks better then the other


All chips aren't created equal.

Quote:
It's only reducing the lifetime of your cpu and this for only 200Mhz difference


Keep in mind chips are meant to live for upwards of 10 years the difference in lifetime between an E6600 clocked at 3.4 compared to 3.6 Ghz is not a valid argument because it will still exceed a lifetime of five years (which is more than enough for anyone who is into overclocking for that much performance)
January 3, 2007 1:06:03 AM

why you need 2 know what my system is ? its a x850xt with a 3500+ right now :)  i already bought my TT armor and my silverstone zeus tho im waiting on my 2 R600's so yea..

if u read a little around u find out that 3.6 isnt that high but its fine for normal use if u have the temps for it on air 8)
January 3, 2007 1:14:17 AM

by the way what is an R600 that everybody has been talking about??
January 3, 2007 1:26:19 AM

its the DX10 gpu from ATI it should come out around february
January 3, 2007 8:58:11 AM

Quote:
I don't get it why one E6600 overclocks better then the other


All chips aren't created equal.

Quote:
It's only reducing the lifetime of your cpu and this for only 200Mhz difference


Keep in mind chips are meant to live for upwards of 10 years the difference in lifetime between an E6600 clocked at 3.4 compared to 3.6 Ghz is not a valid argument because it will still exceed a lifetime of five years (which is more than enough for anyone who is into overclocking for that much performance)

Yes totally true I guess :D  Nice point of view.

But still I wonder if there is anyone out there that has experienced a CPU overclocked to it's limits that died a bit sooner then five years but more like two years? About the CPU chips.....why are they not created equally? What makes the difference? It can't be mistakes made by the robot's that are doing the fabrication processes right? I mean they work so accurate.....
January 3, 2007 9:45:38 AM

I think Coolaler was the first one to achieve 4Ghz on E6600 with air cooling. Using the Tuniq Tower 120 of course. If you want extreme overclocking then the E6400 would be it. As for the settings on the E6600, it would be enough to last the cpu a couple of years just in time to get an upgrade anyways.
January 4, 2007 2:04:53 AM

Price and value is an entirely subjective issue.

What I find interesting is that many of the 6400 fans make it sound is if the 6400 is just superior product and the "no-brainer" purchase choice. I'm not buying into it. You often see people making reference to crazy (obviously fluke) situations like 4ghz air OCs on the 6400. Maybe a person or two made it happen, who knows.... maybe it was even orthos stable for a few minutes. But who cares. Ultimately a purchase decision should be about nominal potential not anomalous results.

The prices are $322.00 and $223.00 at current newegg rates. For me, the extra $100 for a superior processor is worth it. For some people the difference in performance may not be enough to justify the expense.

We're a bit off the topic of the post now. :) 
January 4, 2007 2:13:37 AM

I've gotten to 3.7 Ghz on air with my Zalman CNPS9500, haven't bothered going higher. Temps were about 50C at idle, I'm sure they'd be lower with a Tuniq Tower. I leave mine at 3 Ghz though, it's fast enough for me and temps are good with 30C idle.
January 4, 2007 2:55:05 AM

Well say what you want about the zalman, my 9700 and recently oc'd 6600 to 3.62mhz with a 1.39vcore, 42C idle 53C load, on a striker extreme with team extreem 6400 4-4-4-8 1t.
My zalman works just fine in my TT armor case, must have been something wrong with yours.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 4, 2007 3:32:41 AM

This post is from SyPhyR on the previous page:

Quote:
About the CPU chips.....why are they not created equally? What makes the difference? It can't be mistakes made by the robot's that are doing the fabrication processes right? I mean they work so accurate.....


There are no CPU's 100% identical. Every silicon semiconductor device is unique, and as such, has different basic properties of electronics such as resistance, capacitance, inductance, impedance, and transconductance. Although two consecutive serial number CPU's from the same fabrication, with the same stepping codes, may appear identical, they're yielded from different location on the silicon wafer from which they're manufactured, and like diamonds, each has it's own unique flaws.

Even though their dynamic operational characteristics may be very similar, no two CPU's will overclock to exactly the same stable maximum speed, at the same voltage, at the same temperature. Additionally, in a dual core processor, one core will always run at higher temps and become unstable before the other. Therefore, since there are no overclocking gaurantees due to the variables, all we can project is what's reasonably typical per cooling solution.

Although this helps to partially clarify some answers, no one has yet mentioned any details regarding temperature measurements, such as differences in BIOS readings and various software utilities, just so we're careful to compare apples to apples. :?
January 4, 2007 4:23:40 AM

If you know what your doing and follow the good advise that is all over these forums you do stand a chance to achieve your goals.
Not that 4GHz is possible for everyone (3.6 more likely) but it is possible.
Do you think it’s really necessary to flame a point of correction?
Debating is more acceptable and everyone learns from a good argument that is less inflammatory.
January 4, 2007 4:33:06 PM

Quote:
Yeah, the zalman's are 95% hype, 5% performance (the reason why I bought a long time ago was because it looked cool and it was a popular cooler, but once I saw the performance, I decided that zalman's aremore hype than performance)

Why do you say that? I have one and it seems to have great performance. My E6600 @ 3.0 ghz idles at 30C, and 47C @ 3.6 ghz. That seems good to me... Of course I know there's better out there like the Tuniq Tower and Scythe Infinity, but the Zalman still does a good job.
January 4, 2007 5:25:48 PM

By no means are the Zalman coolers bad coolers. They are simply crappy price/performance and are not top of the line in any aspect other than "cool" factor. Yes, they are great coolers, yes I would gladly use one if I was given one for free. No I would never spend twice the money it would cost to get an equal performing or better performing air cooler.

Zalman makes great cooling products, they just have to ease up on the prices to make them more competitive. They will probably always be slightly over priced because people still buy them and will continue to do so because the nature of the average end user is to impulse buy and buy based on factors other than price/performance. (Ex: iPods, if everyone did research, it wouldn't be such a trend)
January 4, 2007 10:00:47 PM

Well personally I don't care what something costs, it works for me and I like the look of it, I'm happy with my oc and thats all there is to it. Theres always something better out there, but for what it is i think it works well in my case.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 4, 2007 11:15:47 PM

I agree with you N8DOGG.

Quote:
Well personally I don't care what something costs, it works for me and I like the look of it, I'm happy with my oc and thats all there is to it. Theres always something better out there, but for what it is i think it works well in my case.


While some individuals feel free to engage in Zalman bashing over price, they fail to consider other important performance aspects of a good CPU cooler diesign. To take the CPU Cooler debate to a level playing field, the following article reviews all late model high end CPU coolers:

http://www.frostytech.com/articleview.cfm?articleid=204...

The excellent radial design of the Zalman has intake airflow and outflow disbursal patterns which also cools components adjacent to the CPU socket, such as memory modules, chipsets and voltage regulators. This is a feature overlooked by most individuals, which I consider essential for improved overall system cooling. 8)
January 5, 2007 12:14:07 AM

6600 on P5WDG2 WS Pro
3.6 GHz orthos stable, 3.7 GHz mostly app stable, 3.8 GHz SPi stable, 3.9GHz will post but not go into windows.
Cooling: SI-128 (air)

My 24/7 is 3.6 GHz (401 FSB, 1:1)...Running about 1.55 vcore under load.

My chip isn't a great clocker but it's ok.

And before anyone freaks out about such "high" volts, no, I'm not keeping the same CPU for the next 5 years, thanks.
January 5, 2007 12:40:16 AM

Quote:

Cooling: SI-128 (air)



Nice cooler from what I have been hearing :wink:

One of the best air's, if not THE best for in-case situations. It functions as a perfect board cooler, which is needed since I have my board volts generally higher. I ran a tuniq, which had temps just as good, but my board got too hot. Tuniq is best for benching in open air, SI-128 with a "tall" fan that can pull in cool air from outside the case is best for in-case. I'm sure TTBT does the trick as well, but SI-128 is good until I jump to phase.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 5, 2007 12:50:02 AM

Quote:
Are you kidding me? If I purchase an after market CPU cooler I expect it to do one task really well and thats to do a damn good job of cooling my overclocked CPU. Not a half assed job like the overpriced junk that Zalman offers.


Easy with the flame thrower. 8) Obviously you didn't read this.

http://www.frostytech.com/articleview.cfm?articleid=204...

I extensively researched many CPU coolers before deciding on the Zalman 9500. It fits into my case, and it suites my needs extremely well for my rig, at 52c full load.

Quote:
And as far as keeping your system memory cooled, chipset etc.... if you have decent case air flow in the first place then those components will stay plenty cool.


My exact word was "improved". I've gone to great lengths to modify my case for excellent airflow, and it's as good as they get. :D 
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 5, 2007 1:16:03 AM

Quote:
People putting the blame on their CPU coolers because their boards, memory etc.... are overheating are just plain ignorant and obviously dont understand the importance of good Case air flow and ventilation.


Speaking for myself, I'm not interested in placing blame, I'm just interested in solutions. My case airflow is excellent, and I'm happy with all my temps. :D 

Quote:
I dont know about everyone else but I bought my Tuniq tower to take care of my CPU temps and not everything else between.


If a Tuniq tower would fit in my case, then I'd be running one. :lol: 
January 5, 2007 1:26:29 AM

Quote:

Cooling: SI-128 (air)



Nice cooler from what I have been hearing :wink:

One of the best air's, if not THE best for in-case situations. It functions as a perfect board cooler, which is needed since I have my board volts generally higher. I ran a tuniq, which had temps just as good, but my board got too hot. Tuniq is best for benching in open air, SI-128 with a "tall" fan that can pull in cool air from outside the case is best for in-case. I'm sure TTBT does the trick as well, but SI-128 is good until I jump to phase.

I guess I just dont see how anyone could be having temp problems with their board unless they are missing your typical intake and exhaust case air flow setup.

I can only see it being a problem if you dont have at least 2 case fans, one for pulling air in and the other to exhaust it. Keeps everything nice and cool. It just seems dumb to not have decent case airflow.


With my setup my motherboard temps are only 32c and thats with my E6400@3.5ghz :wink:

My concern with mobo temps is for orthos runs. Run orthos blend for 24 hours and your board temps won't be 32c unless you have very low ambient. I do have good case airflow, but I also have a case full of raptors, an 8800GTX, and other heat sources. Without directed airflow near the sink, the NB gets blazing hot.
January 5, 2007 2:16:45 AM

E6600 can be overclocked to 3.4Ghz easily on air. 3.6Ghz on air too but gets a little hotter. 3.8Ghz too but as far as I know runs kinda toasty.... I really dont know about 4ghz

To ironkid, you really live under a rock with some cheapo hsf because even at 3.6Ghz everything is estable in air.
January 5, 2007 2:39:00 AM

Quote:

Cooling: SI-128 (air)



Nice cooler from what I have been hearing :wink:

One of the best air's, if not THE best for in-case situations. It functions as a perfect board cooler, which is needed since I have my board volts generally higher. I ran a tuniq, which had temps just as good, but my board got too hot. Tuniq is best for benching in open air, SI-128 with a "tall" fan that can pull in cool air from outside the case is best for in-case. I'm sure TTBT does the trick as well, but SI-128 is good until I jump to phase.

I guess I just dont see how anyone could be having temp problems with their board unless they are missing your typical intake and exhaust case air flow setup.

I can only see it being a problem if you dont have at least 2 case fans, one for pulling air in and the other to exhaust it. Keeps everything nice and cool. It just seems dumb to not have decent case airflow.


With my setup my motherboard temps are only 32c and thats with my E6400@3.5ghz :wink:

My concern with mobo temps is for orthos runs. Run orthos blend for 24 hours and your board temps won't be 32c unless you have very low ambient. I do have good case airflow, but I also have a case full of raptors, an 8800GTX, and other heat sources. Without directed airflow near the sink, the NB gets blazing hot.

Running orthos blend overnight only gets my MB to 37c. For what its worth my room temp is 68F.

I have the following-

E6400@3.5ghz 1.4v core
Asus P5b delux
4gig DDR2@1000mhz 4 4 4 5 2.3v core
8800GTX@630c and 2030mem.
Soundblaster Audigy 4

37c is too hot for my board, because it's much hotter than what it reads. Also, you are running 965, I am running 975. NB is almost too hot to touch w/o fan blowing on it. I'm not sure if you're saying I'm imagining it's too hot to touch or what your ultimate point is. There is more than just the CPU to keep cool, and unless I have a huricane of airflow through the case, having air blow down on the NB when heavily overvolted is a nice to have.
January 5, 2007 2:56:53 AM

Quote:
There is more than just the CPU to keep cool, and unless I have a hurican of airflow through the case, having air blow down on the NB when heavily overvolted is a nice to have.


This is the main reason I'm using a TTBT instead of an Tuniq Tower... I still find myself tempted to pick up a Tuniq just to give it a try. :) 
January 5, 2007 3:13:48 AM

Quote:
There is more than just the CPU to keep cool, and unless I have a hurican of airflow through the case, having air blow down on the NB when heavily overvolted is a nice to have.


This is the main reason I'm using a TTBT instead of an Tuniq Tower... I still find myself tempted to pick up a Tuniq just to give it a try. :) 

You will see little to no difference between the two on CPU temps if you put a nice fan on the TTBT.
January 5, 2007 3:43:36 AM

The E6600 may generate more heat but it's also built to higher tolerances it will clock higher than E6400. I have yet to see credible proof that anyone has OC'd past 3.7Ghz on air for 24 hours. I have seen this for an E6600 at 4Ghz.
January 5, 2007 4:23:30 AM

Quote:
As the owner of a great overclocking E6400 with a tuniq tower and crazy case air flow I can pretty much speak for what this chip will likely be capable of on air P95 Stable and Acceptable Temps and I can tell you for a fact that 4ghz on air is very unlikely like someone else here was making it out to be.


Are you basing this claim just on your own 6400 or on a larger data set? I've seen a friend's 6400 at 4G on air running dual prime but he could have an exceptional chip. It probably helps that he's a very accomplished overclocker too.
January 5, 2007 5:40:03 AM

Have things changed that much since Toms published this article on overclocking the e6400. Why didn't they push it to the 4ghz limit? What am I missing? Sorry for asking but it's been a long time since my last build and OC.

http://www.tomshardware.com/2006/10/10/cheap_thrills/
January 5, 2007 7:41:47 PM

Quote:
Are you basing this claim just on your own 6400 or on a larger data set?


You obviously didn't read everything so allow me to say it again and this time its for the last time as this is getting really old quick.

Yes, I've seen your claims repeated here. I just asked what you were basing them on.
January 6, 2007 6:08:36 AM

Nice rig RobX2 really top notch stuff in there. And is that what the tuniq tower-120 really looks like? Geez that thing is massive. I'm gonna get a scythe INF-1000 just because it's easier to find than the tuniq tower. Unless I do find one then I might buy it (but my case might have clearance issues)
January 6, 2007 5:57:01 PM

Quote:
And you obviously didn't read my question.


Well obviously I did seeing as I took the time to respond to it :roll:

That fact is, you still have not answered it. The question was simple. Look back up in post #86 and you'll see that I asked the following:

"Are you basing this claim just on your own 6400 or on a larger data set?"

See, I've read this entire thread including all of your fist-pounding and name-calling, but when it gets to specifics, you only mention YOUR 6400. I'm asking if you're basing the claims on real numbers. In message 24, you stated:

"If anyone is truly able to get a stable 4ghz P95 overclock on air with acceptable temps on an E6400 then they are most likely in the 1%range of people who just got damn lucky."

So I'm asking: Is the "1%" you tossed out based on real data? What is your source of data? Just your 6400?

Quote:
I've seen your claims repeated here.


Quote:
Then stop asking about whats already been discussed. :lol: 


I'm not just asking about your 6400. I'm asking if the info you report as if they are absolutes are based just on your chip alone or if you've looked elsewhere and collected data. I've personally witnessed an air-cooled 6400 running dual prime at 4GHz. The REASON I'm asking you what you are basing your claims on is because a friend is assembling a PC with a 6400 and he asked me what kind of air cooled OC to expect. He's got the Gigabyte P965 and some Mushkin Redline RAM so I told him he'd probably do better than 3GHz but I didn't know that he'd be able to get over 3.4. If my friend had asked about a 6800 on air, I could have provided a bunch of links to stuff on Xtreme Systems, Toms, etc., but I haven't followed the 6400 much because it doesn't interest me as much as the larger cache chips.

Quote:
I just asked what you were basing them on.


Quote:
Again, learn to read. My point still stands.


If you think that your chip represents the peak performance of all 6400s, then you're probably mistaken. The three game boxes in our house have the same CPUs, mobos and GPUs but they don't OC the same and even seem to show more CPU/mobo interactivity than I'd expect. Hard core overclockers are known to purchase multiple CPUs in an attempt to get an exceptional chip.
January 6, 2007 6:50:08 PM

When you guys are discussing temps... are you using Asus probe like in the pictures posted or core temp program?
January 6, 2007 7:53:15 PM

Wow I am definitely going to get it then. Thanks for the info :wink:
January 6, 2007 8:08:39 PM

becose every silicon part is different and not all strained materials have the same concentrations of electrons and are not the same perfect parts, when they use light to oxid some parts of the silicon piece not all them get the same, so some processors have current leakages when high frecuencies and some others have not , the most perfect ones start to have current leakages at higher core clocks, thats what intel uses to say if one core should be a e6600 or e6700 or whatever......, there are not robots manufacturing processors so easily as u thing, there are chemical treatments, lighting serigrafy over the silicon slice....... much complex thing that make dies from the same piece os silicon to differ a lot.
PD: sorry for my english
January 6, 2007 8:59:06 PM

I have mine @:

Core2Duo E6600 @ 3.6 GHz (400 x 9) @ 1.425V
Corsair Detonator PC26400D @ 2.1V
ASUS P5B Deluxe
Zalman CNPS9500 LED CPU Cooler
120 MM Fans (1 intake, 1 exhaust)
EVGA 8800GTX
Creative X-Fi XtremeMusic

Runs stable 24/7 and I have windows set to a low power profile so when the PC is idle, it will drop the voltage and multiplier to conserve power. When the process is being used, it goes back up to full speed. Not bad if you ask me. I would like to water cool though in the future.
January 7, 2007 1:42:46 AM

Quote:

I can fire mine up to 4ghz as I have done many many times before, long enough to run dual prime and then post pics of it on the net for everyone to see

thats 500fsb and a very good OC.
I'll settle for a cpuz validation screenshot.
Please post it.
January 7, 2007 2:19:34 AM

Thats too bad .
it would prove your point :wink:
!