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How hot should my E6600 really be??

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January 2, 2007 5:11:47 PM

Hi

Iv just built my first system ever and just want to know how hot my cpu should be getting.

Its been running for the last 6 hrs....installing all the stuff i lost when i had to format the hard drive, and my current temp is about 52 degrees. Under full load it goes upto 62ish (using intel thermal analysis tool). Is that too hot for this???

Also iv noticed it says my cpu is running at 2300 mhz rather than 2400.

Iv got a asrock 775dual vsta mobo and im running the cpu with the normal heat sink and fan that came with the cpu.

any solutions to the speed of the cores and are the temps too high??

More about : hot e6600

January 2, 2007 5:37:30 PM

62 at full load on TAT with the stock HSF sounds about right. The stock HSF is trash. Some more case ventilation might help some but if you really want it to run cooler, get a good aftermarket heatsink.

As for the speed issue, use CPUz and tell us what the multiplier and FSB are set to.
January 2, 2007 6:10:49 PM

Just as a reference point, my most recent build involved an e6300 overclocked to 3.01ghz. It ran at 37 degrees idle and depending on room temperature 47 to 51 degrees under load. It had an Arctic Freezer 7 Pro cooler on it and the fan control in the bios was disabled to allow for 100% speed all the time.

*oh yeah, and Arctic Silver 5 themal paste
Related resources
January 2, 2007 6:30:41 PM

37 idle and 51 load at 3.01ghz - What were you measuring with and what were you using to load the cores?
January 2, 2007 6:32:10 PM

Temp. monitoring - CoreTemp

To load cores - Orthos Prime
January 2, 2007 6:37:19 PM

Both cores were loaded to 100% for 3 hours of testing.
January 2, 2007 7:15:53 PM

Wow, those are some nice numbers... Wish I ran that cool. Might just be the difference in ambient temps. Overclocked to 2.66 my E6400 will run up 57 or 58 C at full load (measured with TAT or CoreTemp) at full load with my Big Typhoon cooler.
January 2, 2007 8:22:21 PM

my FSB is running at 256.2 rather than 266 (multiplier 9x)

Im guessing its probably cause of my crap DDR2700 memory :lol: 


as for the cpu temp, its fallen down to 48 now. My room was just waay too hot, so all the air going in was hot aswell :)  . I get the feeling when summer comes, im gonna have to invest in a better cooler.
January 3, 2007 12:58:25 PM

I was a bit worried at first when I heard others getting high 20s and low thirties for idle temps, but I guess they were just running below stock voltage or something. I kept the e6300 at stock voltage. The Big Typhoon is supposed to be a good cooler from everything I've read. Are you using Arctic Silver 5 thermal paste? Did you increase the vcore? The warmest the room was when I tested the e6300 was 72 degrees F. The coolest was 65 degrees F. That was when it ran at 47 degrees C under load. While the temps you are getting are definitely within spec, they do seem a little above average to me. Perhaps your ambient temps are just higher as you said.
January 3, 2007 2:01:31 PM

My ambient is usually 72 - 74 F. My temps were a little cooler before adding the 8800 GTS. I think thats partially due to the added heat from the card and partially do to airflow obstruction from the front 120mm fan.

Hmm, maybe I should think about putting a side intake fan on.
January 3, 2007 2:15:10 PM

nope i just used the standard paste that was pre-applied on the heatsink. so thats probably why its high.

currently its idling at 47 and 100% load its at about 60. I'll change the paste and see what difference that makes when i get the time. As far as i can tell, i cant see any performance issues with the current temps. But better safe than sorry i suppose.


Also i got it to its normal clock speed. The mobo bio had it set on auto clock and for reasons unknown to me reduced the FSB to 256. As soon as i put that to manual the FSB went straight to 266 on its own. So now its running at its normal speed.
January 3, 2007 2:35:05 PM

Yeah, almost always a good idea to manually set things like FSB and RAM timings. Motherboard auto settings have always tended to screw things up in the past for me.
a c 79 à CPUs
January 3, 2007 2:37:01 PM

the later bios versions on that mobo all clock the fsb back to 256 and not 266, just 'overclock' it to 266 and it'll be back to normal. or drop down to the 1.90 bios. (the 1.90 bios also matains a lower fan speed, 1100 vs 2000)

My 6600 is running at low 50's under load, and low 30's idle, using the stock HSF and the slowest speed setting on the fan 1100rpm.

Have you fully 'clicked' in the stock HSF legs, its actually a good cooler, just tricky to fit.

The std paste is ok too.
January 3, 2007 2:45:40 PM

I'm sure that 8800GTS heats the case up more than what I initially gave it credit for. That probably is a major factor.
January 3, 2007 2:48:36 PM

yeah im sure i did.

I heard it click any way, and it isnt moving, so i just presumed it was on. If it starts getting too hot i'll test it out with another thermal paste and if that doesnt work then a new fan.

If all of that fails...i'll be sure to buzz in here and request for quick solutions.
a c 79 à CPUs
January 3, 2007 2:49:59 PM

the legs are really really tricky, and often pop out as you work your way around, test each legs and give it a good push with mobo out of case, supporting it from the rear.

also the later bios revisions 2.2 and 2.4 I think appear to remove or perhaps just move the speedstep settings (I've not found them on those versions.)
January 5, 2007 1:41:32 AM

Your numbers sound on the high side. I posted on this same question last month as my processor was running extremely hot because the fan kept turning off. I was told to shut off the auto controls in BIOS that vary the HSF speed and put the fan on full all the time. My fan now runs at 5100-5500 according to Speed Fan. My processor temp is at mid 30s to around 44-45 when playing games according to CoreTemp. I have everyting in an Antec P180 with the 3 fans at their lowest settings.
January 5, 2007 6:09:55 AM

nvidia chip set reads c2d alot higher then intel. who knows why???

50c ok for nvidia thats high for intel they read lower - like 40c
January 5, 2007 6:14:24 AM

Quote:
Wow, those are some nice numbers... Wish I ran that cool. Might just be the difference in ambient temps. Overclocked to 2.66 my E6400 will run up 57 or 58 C at full load (measured with TAT or CoreTemp) at full load with my Big Typhoon cooler.



thats too high your cooling is off - either you do not have enough air movement or something.

my e6300 @ 2.67ghz is 52 load low is 35c
January 5, 2007 7:13:31 AM

Quote:

How hot should my E6600 really be??



In answer to your question, your 6600 should be no hotter than this
January 5, 2007 7:20:59 AM

Quote:

How hot should my E6600 really be??



In answer to your question, your 6600 should be no hotter than this
Funny Girl....you Funny Guy. :p 
January 5, 2007 7:26:51 AM

Quote:

You are on a ROLL!!!


Quote:
Funny Girl....you Funny Guy. :p 



:oops:  :oops:  :oops: 
awww you guys :oops: 
January 5, 2007 9:45:31 AM

Quote:
Your numbers sound on the high side. I posted on this same question last month as my processor was running extremely hot because the fan kept turning off. I was told to shut off the auto controls in BIOS that vary the HSF speed and put the fan on full all the time. My fan now runs at 5100-5500 according to Speed Fan. My processor temp is at mid 30s to around 44-45 when playing games according to CoreTemp. I have everyting in an Antec P180 with the 3 fans at their lowest settings.


I dont think i have a fan control in the bios...will check when i get back home. Its normally running at around 3000ish. If its not in the bios is there any other way to increase the rpm??

@ turpit: LMAO! thanx...that really helped :p 
January 5, 2007 12:56:38 PM

I'v just checked and its actually running at 2000 rpm.

So is there any software that would let me increase its speed???
January 5, 2007 6:09:02 PM

Quote:
I'v just checked and its actually running at 2000 rpm.

So is there any software that would let me increase its speed???


You can try speed fan but Ive seen mixed reviews. Beyond the contols within your mobos BIOs, your next best option is to buy a fan controller.

SpeedFan

Random fan controller at ZZZ
January 5, 2007 7:12:37 PM

o-my 3500-5000 rpms is a airplane engine! i use the stock intel 775 coolers - since i have piles of them from the old p4 days - they work great on c2d at 2500 rpm or so.

if you have alot case fans as all should then c2d practically cools it self! well the intel cooler is like self cooling - little joke!

stick venessa s on there your systems will run at below 40c - since p4's ran 50-75c i woud not worry - the chip will run for years at 50-60c.
January 5, 2007 10:39:53 PM

well that program does work....

only problem is that 2000 rpm is at 100% :evil: 

ah well...its barely crossing 55 degrees now so i might just leave it as it is...at least my system is dead silent.
January 5, 2007 10:44:16 PM

You can drive the fan faster by using an aux controller with direct power from the PSU
January 6, 2007 1:58:51 AM

fan speed is controller by voltage u need a small voltage regulator hooked up to 120v.

just hook it 120v line and spin really fast!

no do not do that!

Pulse-width modulation
Pulse-width modulation (PWM) is a common method of throttling fans (which are basically DC motors), but has a big disadvantage if used to silence fans. If the frequency used is in the range of 20-20000 Hz, it will be transmitted via the fan, acting like a loudspeaker in which the motorcoils and the fan blades act as coil and membrane of the speaker respectively.


[edit] Resistors
Resistors are the simplest method of reducing fan noise but they add to the heat generated inside the computer case. They need to be of the appropriate power rating (i.e. higher than the fan). For variable fan control, potentiometers could be used along with a transistor such as a MOSFET whose output voltage is controlled by the potentiometer. It is possible to use a rheostat instead.


[edit] Diodes
A diode in series with the fan will reduce the voltage being outputted to the fan. You can use a zener diode (select one for the desired voltage drop) or a silicon diode (Produce the required voltage drop by connecting multiple diodes in series. Each diode reduces the voltage by approximately 0.75 volts.)


[edit] Software
The method in which the software physically controls the fan is usually PWM (see above). Many motherboards now include software to control
January 6, 2007 2:00:44 AM

Quote:
fan speed is controller by voltage u need a small voltage regulator hooked up to 120v.

just hook it 120v line and spin really fast!

no do not do that!

Pulse-width modulation
Pulse-width modulation (PWM) is a common method of throttling fans (which are basically DC motors), but has a big disadvantage if used to silence fans. If the frequency used is in the range of 20-20000 Hz, it will be transmitted via the fan, acting like a loudspeaker in which the motorcoils and the fan blades act as coil and membrane of the speaker respectively.


[edit] Resistors
Resistors are the simplest method of reducing fan noise but they add to the heat generated inside the computer case. They need to be of the appropriate power rating (i.e. higher than the fan). For variable fan control, potentiometers could be used along with a transistor such as a MOSFET whose output voltage is controlled by the potentiometer. It is possible to use a rheostat instead.


[edit] Diodes
A diode in series with the fan will reduce the voltage being outputted to the fan. You can use a zener diode (select one for the desired voltage drop) or a silicon diode (Produce the required voltage drop by connecting multiple diodes in series. Each diode reduces the voltage by approximately 0.75 volts.)


[edit] Software
The method in which the software physically controls the fan is usually PWM (see above). Many motherboards now include software to control


Or...he can buy an aftermarket controller that feeds directly from the PSU
January 6, 2007 2:24:30 AM

Quote:
fan speed is controller by voltage u need a small voltage regulator hooked up to 120v.

just hook it 120v line and spin really fast!

no do not do that!
17v mod! :wink: Actually, while okay for case fans et al, this isn't wise on CPU HS fans. :) 
January 6, 2007 3:14:20 AM

pull the cpu cooler put a thermalright that takes a downfiring 12cm fan

thats best trick out there - all these people that orbs and such the down firing fan on the old style thermalright cools the burning hot air cooled asus chip sets!

if your case does not have 4 fans with 2x120 and a door and slot cooler buy a new one!
January 6, 2007 10:06:13 AM

Question 1: If i get a fan controller...which one should i get?
Question 2: Will i be better off getting a better fan?
January 6, 2007 11:13:16 AM

A mate of mine has a E6600 and he reckon's it idle's between 22c and 23c, i reckon he is full of shit and has a cold bug, best bet is to keep the internal temp of your case as cool as possible.
January 6, 2007 2:33:21 PM

cfm is what matters cfm is air flow - higher the better
rpm = noise - more or less - its complex

120cm fan at 1800 rpm is ~50 cfm
90cm @ 2500 rpm ~ 40 cfm
80cm @3300 rpm ~ 35 cfm

ok so if you get a venssa s with 92cm (includes fan contol)

or thermal right with 120cm u cool your system and quiet it!

get 2500 rpm 12cm fan - hook up a fan contoller - zalman makes a single fan controller and dial in the fan until the noise just drops off.

the venessa you can hook up a tornado fan 92mm 5500 rpm - its loud and dial in your cooling. it blows frecken 90-100cfm at full blast.

i use a thermal right xp-90 with a torando and venessa contoller as my burnin fan when i set up systems - just since i have the parts laying around!

lastly - check your bios - and mess with the air flow lower the fan speed until u see a raise in temps then raise the speed slightly!


hows that!
!