Domain!

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Microsoft defines the word 'DOMAIN' as a group of computers that are
part of a network. Now I access the Net using cable connection which
means that my personal computer is a part of a network. Is my PC a
domain or is the entire network of which I am a part a domain? What
exactly is a domain?

I navigated to Control Panel--->Administrative Tools & opened Internet
Services Manager. I right-clicked 'Default SMTP Virtual Server' &
clicked 'Properties'. Under the 'Delivery' tab I clicked the
'Advanced...' button & found that the 'Fully qualified domain name'
textbox is already populated. When I clicked the 'Check DNS' button, a
message saying 'The domain name is valid' popped-up. Now from where did
IIS get that domain name?

I log in to my Windows 2000 Pro system using 'Adminstrator' as the
Login ID & the domain name wasn't 'Administrator'.

Thanks,

Arpan
2 answers Last reply
More about domain
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Without getting too technical, "Domain" is used in two related senses:

    DNS domains are the one most people are familiar with from daily use of the Internet. microsoft.com, google.com, iana.org and so
    forth. On a cable connection, your ISP will usually assign (through DHCP) their domain name that your computer or connected router
    belongs to. The 'fully qualified domain name' will be your computer's name prepended to that domain.

    For the average home computer the domain won't make any difference except that if you type in, say, "xxx" to your browser, Windows
    helpfully tries to connect you to http://xxx.<your domain name> and other variations on that, before giving up with the IE
    cant-find-your-site screen.

    Active directory (or older NT LM) 'domains' are a secured group of networked, Windows machines with one or more 'domain controller'
    servers. This type of 'domain' is a completely different animal of course, and specific to Microsoft networking. And what makes it
    confusing is that an Active Directory domain is associated with a DNS domain (such as mycompany.local). And when your computer has
    been joined to such an AD domain, it is quite important that its associated primary DNS domain be set correctly for things to work
    right. (If you open a CMD prompt you can use "ipconfig /all" to see the primary DNS suffix that your computer is using, and you can
    set this in TCP/IP properties if you wish.)

    Unless you override it, the FQDN on the SMTP delivery tab will be preconfigured at startup to
    <yourcomputername>.<yourDNSdomainname>. I'm not 100% sure of this, but I think that the DNS test there just checks that there is an
    MX record for the top-level domain you've specified - it doesn't tell you much more than that. For example, if your FQDN shows there
    as "arpan.mycompany.com", then the DNS test will check that it can see mail exchanger record(s) for mycompany.com.

    Steve Duff, MCSE, MVP
    Ergodic Systems, Inc.

    "Arpan" <arpan_de@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:1120616593.236874.20200@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > Microsoft defines the word 'DOMAIN' as a group of computers that are
    > part of a network. Now I access the Net using cable connection which
    > means that my personal computer is a part of a network. Is my PC a
    > domain or is the entire network of which I am a part a domain? What
    > exactly is a domain?
    >
    > I navigated to Control Panel--->Administrative Tools & opened Internet
    > Services Manager. I right-clicked 'Default SMTP Virtual Server' &
    > clicked 'Properties'. Under the 'Delivery' tab I clicked the
    > 'Advanced...' button & found that the 'Fully qualified domain name'
    > textbox is already populated. When I clicked the 'Check DNS' button, a
    > message saying 'The domain name is valid' popped-up. Now from where did
    > IIS get that domain name?
    >
    > I log in to my Windows 2000 Pro system using 'Adminstrator' as the
    > Login ID & the domain name wasn't 'Administrator'.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Arpan
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Arpan fumbled, fiddled and fingered:

    > Microsoft defines the word 'DOMAIN' as a group of computers that are
    > part of a network. Now I access the Net using cable connection which
    > means that my personal computer is a part of a network. Is my PC a
    > domain or is the entire network of which I am a part a domain? What
    > exactly is a domain?
    >
    > I navigated to Control Panel--->Administrative Tools & opened Internet
    > Services Manager. I right-clicked 'Default SMTP Virtual Server' &
    > clicked 'Properties'. Under the 'Delivery' tab I clicked the
    > 'Advanced...' button & found that the 'Fully qualified domain name'
    > textbox is already populated. When I clicked the 'Check DNS' button, a
    > message saying 'The domain name is valid' popped-up. Now from where
    > did IIS get that domain name?
    >
    > I log in to my Windows 2000 Pro system using 'Adminstrator' as the
    > Login ID & the domain name wasn't 'Administrator'.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Arpan

    From the Windows 2000 help file:

    "In Windows 2000 and Active Directory, a collection of computers defined
    by the administrator of a Windows 2000 Server network that share a
    common directory database.
    A domain has a unique name and provides access to the centralized user
    accounts and group accounts maintained by the domain administrator. Each
    domain has its own security policies and security relationships with
    other domains and represents a single security boundary of a Windows
    2000 computer network. Active Directory is made up of one or more
    domains, each of which can span more than one physical location.

    For DNS, a domain is any tree or subtree within the DNS namespace.
    Although the names for DNS domains often correspond to Active Directory
    domains, DNS domains should not be confused with Windows 2000 and Active
    Directory networking domains.
    See also directory partition."

    Basically a "Microsoft Domain" is a group of PC's and users whose
    security and access are controled by a Windows NT,2000 or 2003 server.


    --
    Steve Parry BA (Hons) MCP MVP

    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    http://www.gwynfryn.co.uk
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