Installing xp on win2000?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I have recently got a new laptop which has win xp. The instllation files
are now on the harddisk in a directory called i386 and there is no
backup xp cd anymore, which seems to be the new trend.
I was thinking to map this directory
as a network drive and use i386\winnt32.exe to install it over
a win2000 machine I have. I am getting dll errors. Any ideas ?
2 answers Last reply
More about installing win2000
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    When a manufacturer supplies an OS copy as part of a retail PC package,
    it is extremely unlikely that the OS code provided is identical to the
    full retail OS version. The manufacturer will have provided an OS
    version that will install only on his own brand hardware, and possibly
    only on the specific PC model the code came with. That's the nature of
    the Microsoft contract with the manufacturer.

    www wrote:
    > I have recently got a new laptop which has win xp. The instllation files
    > are now on the harddisk in a directory called i386 and there is no
    > backup xp cd anymore, which seems to be the new trend.
    > I was thinking to map this directory
    > as a network drive and use i386\winnt32.exe to install it over
    > a win2000 machine I have. I am getting dll errors. Any ideas ?
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    www wrote:
    > I have recently got a new laptop which has win xp. The instllation files
    > are now on the harddisk in a directory called i386 and there is no
    > backup xp cd anymore, which seems to be the new trend.
    > I was thinking to map this directory
    > as a network drive and use i386\winnt32.exe to install it over
    > a win2000 machine I have. I am getting dll errors. Any ideas ?
    >
    >


    You problem stems from the fact that you have an OEM version of WinXP.
    An OEM version _cannot_ be used to upgrade an earlier OS, as it was
    specifically designed to perform only a clean installation.

    The point is moot, however, also because you have an OEM version of
    WinXP. OEM versions must be sold with a piece of hardware (normally a
    motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC, although Microsoft has
    greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP) and are _permanently_
    bound to the first PC on which they are installed. An OEM license, once
    installed, is not legally transferable to another computer under any
    circumstances.

    You need to purchase a separate WinXP license for each computer on
    which you install it.

    Just as it has *always* been with *all* Microsoft operating
    systems, it's necessary (to be in compliance with both the EULA and U.S.
    copyright law http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/117.html), if not
    technically) to purchase one WinXP license for each computer on which it
    is installed. (Consult an attorney versed in copyright law to determine
    final applicability in your locale.) The only way in which WinXP
    licensing differs from that of earlier versions of Windows is that
    Microsoft has finally added a copy protection and anti-theft mechanism,
    Product Activation, to prevent (or at least make more difficult)
    multiple installations using a single license.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
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