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Access to raid 0 from Win XP

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January 4, 2007 8:44:06 PM

Hi all!

From Windows XP Proffesional I want to access a already used raid 0 volume.
I don't know if matters, but I made this raid 0 from Linux, and it calls the volume by /dev/md0.
Any hint?



Thank you
Tom

More about : access raid win

Anonymous
a b G Storage
January 4, 2007 10:51:09 PM

man samba

Grumpy
January 4, 2007 11:35:55 PM

hi Grumpy!

Maybe I was not clear..
It's on the same machine, not on the network.
I run win xp pro and have on the same machine a raid 0 volume. This volume is builded with one partition on the first HD and one on the second. But I don't want to build a raid 0 (via windows tools), but access that already exists.


Thank you
Tom
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January 5, 2007 8:01:22 PM

It's not going to happen without samba. Windows and Linux use totally different filesystems.
January 5, 2007 8:07:07 PM

for shizzel
Anonymous
a b G Storage
January 5, 2007 11:46:38 PM

It's not going to happen on the same computer. There's no way Windows can mount a Linux RAID-0 file system.

Grumpy
January 6, 2007 1:04:44 AM

Quote:
The problem is not on the FS level. About FS, win can access linux ones (ext2, ext3), look http://www.fs-driver.org/, or http://uranus.it.swin.edu.au/~jn/linux/explore2fs.htm.
The problem here is win to recognize raid devices. Raid system is not Linux specific, but a open standard. Possible it is, I'd like to know if it was implemented.


Thank you
Tom


Sorry, bud, but it'll take more than a couple 404s to make me believe that Windows (FAT or NTFS) and Linux Filesystems are interchangable.

Even if you're right, though, I guarantee you wouldn't get RAID volumes working on the same machine for both OSs. Take that to the bank. :) 
January 11, 2007 9:34:13 AM

Hi tomlobato,

You've left out some important details like:

1) Was the RAID volume controlled by software or hardware RAID?
2) Have these disks have been moved to another machine or are they in the same machine?

I'll try to cover each scenario.

If 1) is hardware and 2) is same machine then you should be able to access this in Windows by installing the required hardware RAID drivers.

If 1) is hardware and 2) is different machine whether you can access the RAID volume or not is down to compatibilities between the 2 RAID controllers.

If 1) is software then you have no chance of accessing the RAID volume in Windows unless there is some tool out there that I'm not aware of that makes Windows XP aware of Linux software RAID (in which case it's up to you to find it)
January 11, 2007 10:38:57 AM

>You've left out some important details like:

No, he hasn't.

>Was the RAID volume controlled by software or hardware RAID?

It's /dev/md0 so it's software RAID.

>Have these disks have been moved to another machine or are they in the same machine?

He's already said it's the same machine.


It's theoretically possible to do, but it'll be a total pain the backside. This is (one of the many reasons) why you shouldn't use RAID 0...
January 11, 2007 10:45:21 AM

If the filesystem is FAT32, you might be able to, but its unlikely due to incompatibilities between the RAID drivers.

If windows disk manager seed the volume, you can try to assign it a drive letter.

But I suspect the Linux RAID driver writes a header to the volume which won't mean anything to Windows - WIndows will see individual disks and not an array.

I went the other way - I had Linux try to recognize my Windows array, but all Linux saw was individual disks.
a b G Storage
January 11, 2007 11:03:40 AM

Brute force solution

Add another (large enough) drive.
Format new drive so both Windows and Linux can read it.
Boot to linux from a cd.
Back up data from raid0 to new drive.
Format the drives as a new raid under windows or get a hardware raid solution.
Restore data as needed.

Q
January 11, 2007 3:17:02 PM

Quote:
>You've left out some important details like:

No, he hasn't.

>Was the RAID volume controlled by software or hardware RAID?

It's /dev/md0 so it's software RAID.

>Have these disks have been moved to another machine or are they in the same machine?

He's already said it's the same machine.



Blimey, aren't you the master of the universe. Pardon me for not knowing that /dev/md0 meant it was software RAID and missing a sentence.

Quote:
This is (one of the many reasons) why you shouldn't use RAID 0...


You don't even know why he decided to use it in the first place so you being rather fatuous in declaring that he shouldn't use RAID 0.

At least we agree on one thing, with software RAID you might as well forget accessing it in Windows.
January 11, 2007 3:19:45 PM

Quote:
Brute force solution

Add another (large enough) drive.
Format new drive so both Windows and Linux can read it.
Boot to linux from a cd.
Back up data from raid0 to new drive.
Format the drives as a new raid under windows or get a hardware raid solution.
Restore data as needed.

Q

*ding* *ding*
we have a winner.
January 12, 2007 2:53:04 AM

Very good. Thank you guys.

So, it appears to be really hard. Let`s wait until, maybe, some good soul make such drivers for windows (specific linux soft raid). Or, of course, the inverse: linux driver for windows soft raid.
January 12, 2007 8:54:35 AM

>blimey, aren't you the master of the universe

Evidently you didn't read my message in the spirit it was intended. I intended it to be a "actually, though you might not realise it, saying that it's /dev/md0 means that it's a software RAID".

As in, it was intended to be a helpful comment, not a "nyah, nyah, I know more than you, dumbass" comment. ;) 

Sorry if you took it the wrong way!

>you don't even know why he decided to use it in the first place so you being rather fatuous in declaring that he shouldn't use RAID 0.

Well, no. My opinions on RAID 0 have been stated at great length in other threads. Suffice it to say that RAID 0 is, for everything other than a few highly specialised applications, utterly worthless. And even in those specialised applications you need to have a proper backup of all data.
!