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Radeon 9100 video card to Zenith C32V37 HDTV via DVI cable?

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Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
April 9, 2004 7:38:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

My ATI Radeon 9100 video card has both VGA and DVI output ports. My Zenith
C32V37 HDTV has a DVI-D input port, as well as component video, S-video, and
composite video. I bought a DVI-D single-link cable to connect the video
card to the HDTV, but it's not working properly:

- If I boot the computer using VGA connected to an ordinary monitor, and
then connect the HDTV via DVI additionally, WinXP correctly detects a second
monitor, but nothing displays on it.

- If I boot the computer with the HDTV connected via DVI (with or without
VGA also), nothing is displayed and the computer eventually hangs.

I might be willing to buy ATI's HDTV Component Video Adapter for $29 (which
is supposed to convert VGA to component video), but this adapter is only
advertised to work with the 9500, 9600, 9700, 9800, and 8500 series cards,
not the 9100.

Any ideas?
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
April 10, 2004 2:12:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Success with DVI has not been good. I have seen a lot of comments. I
personally run 720 X 480 dvi on a similar zenith unit with a Radeon 7500 and
my analog VGA display is actually running 640 X 480 in clone mode. It does
work quite well although there is some ovoerscan. Have not had any success
with higher resolutions. I think the best answer right now is to wait for
real display cards that are specifically built to support 1080i. If you
cannnot wait then buy a Radeon 9600 and get the component adapter. The only
problem with the component adapter is analog noise and some overscan.


Richard R.



"Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:Vrzdc.9994$Hc.3244@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> My ATI Radeon 9100 video card has both VGA and DVI output ports. My
Zenith
> C32V37 HDTV has a DVI-D input port, as well as component video, S-video,
and
> composite video. I bought a DVI-D single-link cable to connect the video
> card to the HDTV, but it's not working properly:
>
> - If I boot the computer using VGA connected to an ordinary monitor, and
> then connect the HDTV via DVI additionally, WinXP correctly detects a
second
> monitor, but nothing displays on it.
>
> - If I boot the computer with the HDTV connected via DVI (with or without
> VGA also), nothing is displayed and the computer eventually hangs.
>
> I might be willing to buy ATI's HDTV Component Video Adapter for $29
(which
> is supposed to convert VGA to component video), but this adapter is only
> advertised to work with the 9500, 9600, 9700, 9800, and 8500 series cards,
> not the 9100.
>
> Any ideas?
>
>
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
April 10, 2004 11:41:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Your television is not a plug and play device and hence is not sending the
information your computer needs to format the video output. You will need
to do that yourself with a program like
Powerstrip. The problem has been discussed in this forum and you should be
able to find
the information you need with a google search.
Ed

"Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:Vrzdc.9994$Hc.3244@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> My ATI Radeon 9100 video card has both VGA and DVI output ports. My
Zenith
> C32V37 HDTV has a DVI-D input port, as well as component video, S-video,
and
> composite video. I bought a DVI-D single-link cable to connect the video
> card to the HDTV, but it's not working properly:
>
> - If I boot the computer using VGA connected to an ordinary monitor, and
> then connect the HDTV via DVI additionally, WinXP correctly detects a
second
> monitor, but nothing displays on it.
>
> - If I boot the computer with the HDTV connected via DVI (with or without
> VGA also), nothing is displayed and the computer eventually hangs.
>
> I might be willing to buy ATI's HDTV Component Video Adapter for $29
(which
> is supposed to convert VGA to component video), but this adapter is only
> advertised to work with the 9500, 9600, 9700, 9800, and 8500 series cards,
> not the 9100.
>
> Any ideas?
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
April 11, 2004 10:28:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:Vrzdc.9994$Hc.3244@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> My ATI Radeon 9100 video card has both VGA and DVI output ports. My
Zenith
> C32V37 HDTV has a DVI-D input port, as well as component video, S-video,
and
> composite video. I bought a DVI-D single-link cable to connect the video
> card to the HDTV, but it's not working properly:
>
> - If I boot the computer using VGA connected to an ordinary monitor, and
> then connect the HDTV via DVI additionally, WinXP correctly detects a
second
> monitor, but nothing displays on it.
>
> - If I boot the computer with the HDTV connected via DVI (with or without
> VGA also), nothing is displayed and the computer eventually hangs.
>
> I might be willing to buy ATI's HDTV Component Video Adapter for $29
(which
> is supposed to convert VGA to component video), but this adapter is only
> advertised to work with the 9500, 9600, 9700, 9800, and 8500 series cards,
> not the 9100.
>
> Any ideas?

Your Zenith HDTV can only accept a 480p or 1080i signal, thru component or
DVI. Try setting the computer for VGA (480x640 at 60p). The program
"Powerstrip" may allow your video card to generate 1080i timing that would
work.
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
April 12, 2004 5:35:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"John Smith" <no_one@nowhere.net> wrote in message
news:b7gec.1202$YM3.1012@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
> Your Zenith HDTV can only accept a 480p or 1080i signal, thru component or
> DVI. Try setting the computer for VGA (480x640 at 60p). The program
> "Powerstrip" may allow your video card to generate 1080i timing that would
> work.

Thanks to you and others for all the information and suggestions. I did
indeed need Powerstrip. Even with that, the best resolution I could get was
1816x520. (I backed down the vertical from 540 down to 520 in order to
reduce the overscan effect. I still get a significant overscan effect on
the left side; the display simply will not move farther to the right.) I
could not get any 480p signals to appear on the HDTV at all, despite
Powerstrip; and at 1080i, the best that would show up on the HDTV was skewed
gibberish. This site

http://www.digitalconnection.com/Support/cliffnotes_17....

appears to indicate that ATI cards do not support interlacing through the
DVI output port. (The page shows both i and p resolutions for Nvidia, but
only p resolutions for ATI.)

Note also that because of the deinterlacing, the HDTV display of 1816x520 is
vertically stretched, which makes text less readable. Cutting the
horizontal resolution in half (down to 912x520, for example) does *not* fix
this; rather, the smaller horizontal resolution merely fits in the left half
of the screen, leaving the right half blank and still resulting in
vertically stretched, less readable text. If anyone has any solution to
this, please let me know.
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
April 12, 2004 6:50:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 15:38:29 GMT, "Lawrence G. Mayka"
<lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote:

>My ATI Radeon 9100 video card has both VGA and DVI output ports. My Zenith
>C32V37 HDTV has a DVI-D input port, as well as component video, S-video, and
>composite video. I bought a DVI-D single-link cable to connect the video
>card to the HDTV, but it's not working properly:
>
>- If I boot the computer using VGA connected to an ordinary monitor, and
>then connect the HDTV via DVI additionally, WinXP correctly detects a second
>monitor, but nothing displays on it.
>
>- If I boot the computer with the HDTV connected via DVI (with or without
>VGA also), nothing is displayed and the computer eventually hangs.
>
>I might be willing to buy ATI's HDTV Component Video Adapter for $29 (which
>is supposed to convert VGA to component video), but this adapter is only
>advertised to work with the 9500, 9600, 9700, 9800, and 8500 series cards,
>not the 9100.
>
>Any ideas?
>



I have an ATi All-in-Wonder, 9500, and 9800. All of them work through
DVI with my Mits 65. The 9800 works with the Component adapter.
There is no difference in the picture for any of these using DVI.
There is no difference in the picture on the 9800 using component.
After a bit of frustration initially using Powerstrip, here is what I
did that works good with about one percent overscan, standard drivers,
and no Powerstrip.

Get and install the latest Radeon driver from ATi (or the Omega driver
at http://www.omegacorner.com/ ), which includes optimized resolutions
for all HDTV geometries.

Get your TV running as a monitor at 640x480/60Hz. Bring up the
Dispalay Properties dialog. In Advanced/Monitor, upgrade to the
following Monitor driver for your TV--Sony GDM-900, which is a
standard driver on WinXP. (Do Not use "Plug and Play" driver.) This
will allow you to use all the HDTV resolutions. Uncheck the box on
the monitor properties page captioned "Hide modes that this monitor
cannot display".

On the Adapter properties page, click the button captioned "Show all
modes". You will get a very long listing of every possible
resolution/refresh rate combination. Double click 1920x1080i (30hz
interlaced}. You should now be looking at a stable high resolution
picture.

By the way, "30Hz interlaced", and "60Hz" as a refresh rate setting
both work the same.

On the advanced group, general properties page, change the DPI setting
to 156. and select OK repeatedly until you dismiss the Display
Properties dialog altogether. Reboot.

Go back to the Display Properties dialog, select the Appearance
Properties page. Change Font Size to "Very Large". Select OK to quit
display Properties. You should now have a stable high definition
picture with text that you can read from at least ten fet away.

Now for the overscan problem. You can use Powerstrip to shrink the
screen image a bit, but you may still end up with the same problem you
had before with important parts of the screen out of view. Also
Powerstrip can make the display less than stable, often requiring a
reboot to clean itself up.

The overscan problem also affects your television viewing, so why not
fix both problems at once? Get a copy of Digital Video Essentials,
which contains a 1920x1080 test pattern for checking and adjusting
your screen geometry--height, width, linearity, horizontal and
vertical placement, and overscan. DISABLE POWERSTRIP. Put the DVE CD
into the DVD player on your computer--do not use a stand-alone DVD
player or you will not get a 1920x1080 resolution image on the screen.
Display the DVE program at full screen, 16x9. Find the 1920x1080
pattern and display it. You will be able to read the percentage of
overscan on the edges of the picture. You will be making adjustments
to reduce the overscan to one to two percent all around.

For the adjustments, find the appropriate remote codes to enable
calibration mode on your TVand the codes for geometry and convergence.
You can find these at http://www.hometheatrespot.com and a few other
sites. (Search for the model number of your TV and "calibration" or
"setup codes".}

Adjust the width, height, up-down, left-right to obtain the desired
overscan--you must have some overscan or else the TV picture will have
an annoying black border all around. If the linearity changes,
readjust that using the same test pattern by measuring the size of the
rectangular grid at various spots on the screen with a ruler.

When finished, look at a TV program to make sure that you have not
shrunk the picture too much. You must use a high definition progran,
as the changes you made will affect only the display of high
definition images.

Once you have the geometry fixed, you must do a full convergence
routine at high definition using the calibration menu, as the
convergence will not follow the geometry change. But, hey, you
probably wanted to do that anyway, and the picture can become much
sharper with a careful convergence adjustment.

-e
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
April 12, 2004 7:27:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I had the same problem, and like you, I found that
powerstrip does NOT fix the problem, contrary to what
people advised. I my case, the TV set (a Sammy DLP)
was defective, the fix was having the set replaced with a
non-defective one.

In your case,
Either your set is designed to not work with any computer
DVI card, or perhaps their is a problem with the ATI cards
(I use only nvidia cards, they work fine.) The only way to debug your
problem is the substitution method: cahnge the vid card
for an Nvidia, and/or connect your ATI card to a set that
is proven to work with DVI graphics cards.
In any case, running at low resolution is not a fix.
I've found through experimentation that any set that has
a seperate 15 pin D VGA connector works properly
with the DVI port, properly meaning runs at highest resolution
(1080 or 720 depending on the set).
!