Newbie and burn in question

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi All

Glad to find this site to ask questions about HDTV. I am a little parnoid
right now from the big warning in the instruction book about potential image
burn in on my new Sony 51" set. Almost every cable station we get has their
logo in the same spot during broadcast. So just how long is too long for
something like that to give you trouble? I keep the setting on "movie" since
our room does not get direct sunlight so the brightness is much lower than
"vivid". I cant enjoy watching these stations right now for worrying if I am
burning their logo into my screen! Please set me straight

Andy
5 answers Last reply
More about newbie burn question
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    ANDREW wrote:
    > Hi All
    >
    > Glad to find this site to ask questions about HDTV. I am a little
    > parnoid right now from the big warning in the instruction book about
    > potential image burn in on my new Sony 51" set. Almost every cable
    > station we get has their logo in the same spot during broadcast. So
    > just how long is too long for something like that to give you
    > trouble? I keep the setting on "movie" since our room does not get
    > direct sunlight so the brightness is much lower than "vivid". I cant
    > enjoy watching these stations right now for worrying if I am burning
    > their logo into my screen! Please set me straight
    >
    > Andy

    You are burning the logos into the screen. But the effect can be
    mitigated by calibrating the TV. You've already done the first step and
    used the movie mode. Next, spend $25 and get the Digital Video
    Essentials DVD and calibrate the DVD input. Carry over the settings to
    the other inputs if you need to. You'll have a bigger burn-in potential
    with watching 4:3 material (not stretched/zoomed) or a lot of
    wide-aspect ratio movies (2.35:1), unless the TV uses gray bars (which
    are distracting).

    Burn-in will occur over time. It does on all CRT sets. It's just a
    matter of how long before you see it. Calibrate it and you should be
    fine for years. I have an older RPTV and see no burn-in after about 7
    years of use.

    --
    David G.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    I just got a 50v500A LCD TV, and was told LCD won't burn in, but I don't
    think I trust there word.

    I watched the secend movie last night (Bad boys II) from Family Video, and
    was real disapointed, as it was Wide screen, but would not fill the Top or
    bottom unless I used Zoom which was bad news.

    The Home Theater with tower speakers with 15 inch woofers and surround was
    better then being at a movie, I was really satisfied. (15 inch, no Sub).

    "ANDREW" <realestatebook@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:EE%ec.63$04.47378@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > Hi All
    >
    > Glad to find this site to ask questions about HDTV. I am a little parnoid
    > right now from the big warning in the instruction book about potential
    image
    > burn in on my new Sony 51" set. Almost every cable station we get has
    their
    > logo in the same spot during broadcast. So just how long is too long for
    > something like that to give you trouble? I keep the setting on "movie"
    since
    > our room does not get direct sunlight so the brightness is much lower than
    > "vivid". I cant enjoy watching these stations right now for worrying if I
    am
    > burning their logo into my screen! Please set me straight
    >
    > Andy
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Hi Andrew,

    Burn-in is caused by uneven phosphor wear in the guns. It effects all
    CRT-based rear-projection sets as well as Plasma displays. In spite of
    what others have said it most certinaly can be prevented and doing so
    is as easy as following the manufactuers advice.

    You must limit your viewing of static content ("static" being any
    object on the screen that remains for an extended period of time, be
    it black bars from DVDs, 4:3 verticle bars, network logos, video game
    status bars, etc..) to no more than 15-20% of your total viewing (your
    users guide should state the percentage for your model. If you watch a
    lot of programming on a specific channel that has a non-translucent
    logo you should track the number of hours you are watching that
    channel and be cautious. Using the 20% rule, if you watch a 2-hour DVD
    with horizontal black bars you need to watch 8-hours of full screen
    content to counter the burn-in caused by the bars, apply the same rule
    to logos, etc... This can become a bit of a juggling act, but if you
    follow this advice your phosphor wear will be evened out and you won't
    see burn-in. The problem is a lot of people don't do this. You can
    leave the TV on sometimes even when you're not watching it, yes you
    will reduce the overall life of the TV, but how long do you really
    intend to keep the set (the sets are designed to last a good ten years
    even running at 8 hours a day).

    If your manufactuer has a good service department you can call them to
    verify this.

    -Jeremy


    Properly calibrating your set is also an important element, you should
    combine this with the 15-20% rule.


    "ANDREW" <realestatebook@mindspring.com> wrote in message news:<EE%ec.63$04.47378@twister.southeast.rr.com>...
    > Hi All
    >
    > Glad to find this site to ask questions about HDTV. I am a little parnoid
    > right now from the big warning in the instruction book about potential image
    > burn in on my new Sony 51" set. Almost every cable station we get has their
    > logo in the same spot during broadcast. So just how long is too long for
    > something like that to give you trouble? I keep the setting on "movie" since
    > our room does not get direct sunlight so the brightness is much lower than
    > "vivid". I cant enjoy watching these stations right now for worrying if I am
    > burning their logo into my screen! Please set me straight
    >
    > Andy
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Joe H" <JoeT@mailpuppy.com> wrote in message
    news:EIydnUdt95921ODdRVn-gw@giganews.com...
    > I just got a 50v500A LCD TV, and was told LCD won't burn in, but I don't
    > think I trust there word.
    >
    > I watched the secend movie last night (Bad boys II) from Family Video, and
    > was real disapointed, as it was Wide screen, but would not fill the Top or
    > bottom unless I used Zoom which was bad news.
    >
    > The Home Theater with tower speakers with 15 inch woofers and surround was
    > better then being at a movie, I was really satisfied. (15 inch, no Sub).
    >
    > "ANDREW" <realestatebook@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    > news:EE%ec.63$04.47378@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > > Hi All
    > >
    > > Glad to find this site to ask questions about HDTV. I am a little
    parnoid
    > > right now from the big warning in the instruction book about potential
    > image
    > > burn in on my new Sony 51" set. Almost every cable station we get has
    > their
    > > logo in the same spot during broadcast. So just how long is too long for
    > > something like that to give you trouble? I keep the setting on "movie"
    > since
    > > our room does not get direct sunlight so the brightness is much lower
    than
    > > "vivid". I cant enjoy watching these stations right now for worrying if
    I
    > am
    > > burning their logo into my screen! Please set me straight
    > >
    > > Andy
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >

    None of the Widescreen movies I own fill the top and bottom of my TV. I
    don't think any of them do. It's all to do with aspect ratios which are
    different from film to film and not the same as a widescreen TV.

    Duke
  5. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Joe H" <JoeT@mailpuppy.com> wrote in message
    news:EIydnUdt95921ODdRVn-gw@giganews.com...
    > I just got a 50v500A LCD TV, and was told LCD won't burn in, but I don't
    > think I trust there word.

    LCD TVs don't work the same as CRT or Plasma TVs. LCD's have a Light Panel
    which is behind the color panels. This light panel shines thru the color
    panels and is the same brightness throughout the whole screen. There is no
    static "hot spot" to burn in. It is the color panels which determine how
    dark or light the image will be depending how much light it allows to pass
    thru. This is the same in LCD projectors. These projectors have a lamp
    which shines thru the color panels. The display on a Laptop is a good
    example of a LCD. Laptop don't burn in, they just fade away.
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