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Extended warranty

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April 15, 2004 5:21:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of a
more costly newer tech set.

Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I dont
like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...

More about : extended warranty

Anonymous
April 15, 2004 5:21:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:c5mjpi$95u$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
> I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of a
> more costly newer tech set.
>
> Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I dont
> like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
> what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
>
>I bought a Sony KV36XBR450 a couple of years ago and bought a five year
warranty for $200. The TV is still working fine but I do have peace of
mind. And probably in three more years I'll be ready to go to a larger
display and a 16:9 format.

Bearman
April 15, 2004 5:38:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"bearman" <noyb@home.com> wrote in message
news:HZudnQvGoIaeSOPdRVn-uA@comcast.com...
>
> "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
> news:c5mjpi$95u$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
> > I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of
a
> > more costly newer tech set.
> >
> > Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I
dont
> > like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
> > what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
> >
> >I bought a Sony KV36XBR450 a couple of years ago and bought a five year
> warranty for $200. The TV is still working fine but I do have peace of
> mind. And probably in three more years I'll be ready to go to a larger
> display and a 16:9 format.
>
> Bearman
>
>

I think if I can find at least 3 years for under 200 bucks I will do it,
otherwise I wont, I usually set the price point at abuot 10%, more than that
and I wont buy it... reading through goole searches here, it doesnt really
seem like I will have more than one big problem within 4 years... and thats
what it would take for me to break even on the warranty... so thats my
plan... thanks!
Related resources
Anonymous
April 15, 2004 11:12:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Can YOU fix it???

HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is about
100%. I would never buy the following without a EW

1. Camcorder
2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
3. Big screen

I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you use
the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.

Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the small
issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
repair

On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:

>I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of a
>more costly newer tech set.
>
>Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I dont
>like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
>what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
>
Anonymous
April 15, 2004 11:12:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:idnt70l0g0qeqf8p8g1mi9tj97gch77k60@4ax.com...
> Can YOU fix it???
>
> HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is about
> 100%. I would never buy the following without a EW

Bullshit. If this were true why would they be selling the warranties? On a
Sony CRT based RPTV the odds are you will not come out ahead with an
extended warranty.

> 1. Camcorder
> 2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
> 3. Big screen
>
> I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you use
> the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.

So you know that these are high margin items, these warranties. They can be
a reasonable value on some items like camcorders or newer technologies that
have extremely high repair costs and thus more risk, but for a CRT based
product the risk is much lower. The digital circuitry on the Sonys had been
very reliable.

Mostly, when buying warranties, you are lining someone else's pocket to
avoid risk. Buy from a good dealer who services what he sells and will be
fair about pricing and not rip you off when it comes time to service the
product.

> Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the small
> issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
> repair

Rarely true. I fix them for a living and this is sometimes the case but not
typical.

Leonard Caillouet
April 15, 2004 11:12:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:idnt70l0g0qeqf8p8g1mi9tj97gch77k60@4ax.com...
> Can YOU fix it???
>
> HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is about
> 100%. I would never buy the following without a EW
>
> 1. Camcorder
> 2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
> 3. Big screen
>
> I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you use
> the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.
>
> Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the small
> issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
> repair
>
> On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:
>
> >I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of a
> >more costly newer tech set.
> >
> >Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I dont
> >like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
> >what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
> >
>

Right, which is why I consider a 10% price point. I would like to buy one,
but why pay so much money? I used to sell them at Best Buy so I do know
somethign about them. There is always a small chance something will go
wrong. Whats repair on these... 200 to 500 bucks? What are the chances
that I will need a repair like this within 3 or 4 years, 3 or 4%? My dad
has a first generation VERY new technology 65" Toshiba, and never had
problems, I have a 32" HDTV and no problems after a year.

Could something happen? Sure, will it? I dunno, thats the gamble, and I
really dont like to gamble more than 10% of the cost..
April 15, 2004 11:12:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Well, if you used to sell them, you KNOW they are hugely profitable to Best
Buy. Why?? Cause there's very little need for them. The odds are all in
the seller's favor...not the buyers. Doesn't mean you won't have a problem
with your set....just that it's unlikely.

And they're not warranty's...they're insurance policies...and there IS a
difference.

Oh...and read carefully...a lot of them require YOU to deliver the item to
the service facility...major problem for big screen owners.


"Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:c5mno5$bhi$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
>
> <modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
> news:idnt70l0g0qeqf8p8g1mi9tj97gch77k60@4ax.com...
> > Can YOU fix it???
> >
> > HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is about
> > 100%. I would never buy the following without a EW
> >
> > 1. Camcorder
> > 2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
> > 3. Big screen
> >
> > I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you use
> > the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.
> >
> > Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the small
> > issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
> > repair
> >
> > On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:
> >
> > >I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of
a
> > >more costly newer tech set.
> > >
> > >Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I
dont
> > >like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to
know
> > >what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
> > >
> >
>
> Right, which is why I consider a 10% price point. I would like to buy
one,
> but why pay so much money? I used to sell them at Best Buy so I do know
> somethign about them. There is always a small chance something will go
> wrong. Whats repair on these... 200 to 500 bucks? What are the chances
> that I will need a repair like this within 3 or 4 years, 3 or 4%? My dad
> has a first generation VERY new technology 65" Toshiba, and never had
> problems, I have a 32" HDTV and no problems after a year.
>
> Could something happen? Sure, will it? I dunno, thats the gamble, and I
> really dont like to gamble more than 10% of the cost..
>
>
Anonymous
April 15, 2004 11:53:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:c5mno5$bhi$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
>
> <modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
> news:idnt70l0g0qeqf8p8g1mi9tj97gch77k60@4ax.com...
> > Can YOU fix it???
> >
> > HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is about
> > 100%. I would never buy the following without a EW
> >
> > 1. Camcorder
> > 2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
> > 3. Big screen
> >
> > I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you use
> > the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.
> >
> > Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the small
> > issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
> > repair
> >
> > On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:
> >
> > >I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of
a
> > >more costly newer tech set.
> > >
> > >Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I
dont
> > >like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to
know
> > >what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
> > >
> >
>
> Right, which is why I consider a 10% price point. I would like to buy
one,
> but why pay so much money? I used to sell them at Best Buy so I do know
> somethign about them. There is always a small chance something will go
> wrong. Whats repair on these... 200 to 500 bucks? What are the chances
> that I will need a repair like this within 3 or 4 years, 3 or 4%? My dad
> has a first generation VERY new technology 65" Toshiba, and never had
> problems, I have a 32" HDTV and no problems after a year.
>
> Could something happen? Sure, will it? I dunno, thats the gamble, and I
> really dont like to gamble more than 10% of the cost..
>
>

Apparently, unless I was misinformed or I misunderstood, the Best Buy
service plan that I purchased with my 57h83 Toshiba this past January covers
a yearly tech visit for maintenance, such as aligning the crt's convergence
and such. I am actually not sure if its "yearly" or specifically "when you
need it," but if it is indeed, "when I need it" then I am sure that it could
use a bit of tweaking each year by a professional. A nice feature in
addition to the complete 4 year protection that the plan offers. If I had
kids or a dog right now, I would be even more worried about something
happening, but as it is, we're always having people over, and they are
sometimes (usually) inebriated...so having a protection plan just means a
bit more peace of mind for me. I wouldn't get the TV without it.

Matt
Anonymous
April 15, 2004 11:54:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"mr E" <jimmmmmmmm@jim.com> wrote in message
news:jLBfc.139794$gA5.1671129@attbi_s03...
>
> "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
> news:c5mno5$bhi$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
> >
> > <modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
> > news:idnt70l0g0qeqf8p8g1mi9tj97gch77k60@4ax.com...
> > > Can YOU fix it???
> > >
> > > HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is about
> > > 100%. I would never buy the following without a EW
> > >
> > > 1. Camcorder
> > > 2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
> > > 3. Big screen
> > >
> > > I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you use
> > > the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.
> > >
> > > Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the small
> > > issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
> > > repair
> > >
> > > On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > >I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead
of
> a
> > > >more costly newer tech set.
> > > >
> > > >Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I
> dont
> > > >like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to
> know
> > > >what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
> > > >
> > >
> >
> > Right, which is why I consider a 10% price point. I would like to buy
> one,
> > but why pay so much money? I used to sell them at Best Buy so I do know
> > somethign about them. There is always a small chance something will go
> > wrong. Whats repair on these... 200 to 500 bucks? What are the chances
> > that I will need a repair like this within 3 or 4 years, 3 or 4%? My
dad
> > has a first generation VERY new technology 65" Toshiba, and never had
> > problems, I have a 32" HDTV and no problems after a year.
> >
> > Could something happen? Sure, will it? I dunno, thats the gamble, and
I
> > really dont like to gamble more than 10% of the cost..
> >
> >
>
> Apparently, unless I was misinformed or I misunderstood, the Best Buy
> service plan that I purchased with my 57h83 Toshiba this past January
covers
> a yearly tech visit for maintenance, such as aligning the crt's
convergence
> and such. I am actually not sure if its "yearly" or specifically "when
you
> need it," but if it is indeed, "when I need it" then I am sure that it
could
> use a bit of tweaking each year by a professional. A nice feature in
> addition to the complete 4 year protection that the plan offers. If I had
> kids or a dog right now, I would be even more worried about something
> happening, but as it is, we're always having people over, and they are
> sometimes (usually) inebriated...so having a protection plan just means a
> bit more peace of mind for me. I wouldn't get the TV without it.
>
> Matt

What you haven't considered is who will be doing the service. Most techs
wouldn't know or care enough about your set to tweak it for optimum
performance. Most are lucky to just get it working if it breaks. Now if
the servicer honoring the warranty is really good, there might be some value
in this service. Read the fine print, however, and don't assume that what
you hear from a BB salesman is truth.

Leonard
Anonymous
April 16, 2004 2:14:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

BB extended service warranties are only for parts and labor, nothing more.
I have never seen or heard anything about them doing a yearly maintenance
service on anything they sell. Not to mention, BB uses third party services
to do there work, so you don't know who you are dealing with. CC tells you
that you have to 'fake' a service call for them to come out and maintenance
it. And again CC uses third party services.

Scott

"Leonard G. Caillouet" <lcaillo_ns_@devoynet.com> wrote in message
news:xGDfc.19512$Yw5.2658@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
>
> "mr E" <jimmmmmmmm@jim.com> wrote in message
> news:jLBfc.139794$gA5.1671129@attbi_s03...
> >
> > "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
> > news:c5mno5$bhi$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
> > >
> > > <modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
> > > news:idnt70l0g0qeqf8p8g1mi9tj97gch77k60@4ax.com...
> > > > Can YOU fix it???
> > > >
> > > > HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is
about
> > > > 100%. I would never buy the following without a EW
> > > >
> > > > 1. Camcorder
> > > > 2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
> > > > 3. Big screen
> > > >
> > > > I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you
use
> > > > the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.
> > > >
> > > > Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the
small
> > > > issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
> > > > repair
> > > >
> > > > On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > >I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV
instead
> of
> > a
> > > > >more costly newer tech set.
> > > > >
> > > > >Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set?
I
> > dont
> > > > >like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to
> > know
> > > > >what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
> > > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > > Right, which is why I consider a 10% price point. I would like to buy
> > one,
> > > but why pay so much money? I used to sell them at Best Buy so I do
know
> > > somethign about them. There is always a small chance something will
go
> > > wrong. Whats repair on these... 200 to 500 bucks? What are the
chances
> > > that I will need a repair like this within 3 or 4 years, 3 or 4%? My
> dad
> > > has a first generation VERY new technology 65" Toshiba, and never had
> > > problems, I have a 32" HDTV and no problems after a year.
> > >
> > > Could something happen? Sure, will it? I dunno, thats the gamble,
and
> I
> > > really dont like to gamble more than 10% of the cost..
> > >
> > >
> >
> > Apparently, unless I was misinformed or I misunderstood, the Best Buy
> > service plan that I purchased with my 57h83 Toshiba this past January
> covers
> > a yearly tech visit for maintenance, such as aligning the crt's
> convergence
> > and such. I am actually not sure if its "yearly" or specifically "when
> you
> > need it," but if it is indeed, "when I need it" then I am sure that it
> could
> > use a bit of tweaking each year by a professional. A nice feature in
> > addition to the complete 4 year protection that the plan offers. If I
had
> > kids or a dog right now, I would be even more worried about something
> > happening, but as it is, we're always having people over, and they are
> > sometimes (usually) inebriated...so having a protection plan just means
a
> > bit more peace of mind for me. I wouldn't get the TV without it.
> >
> > Matt
>
> What you haven't considered is who will be doing the service. Most techs
> wouldn't know or care enough about your set to tweak it for optimum
> performance. Most are lucky to just get it working if it breaks. Now if
> the servicer honoring the warranty is really good, there might be some
value
> in this service. Read the fine print, however, and don't assume that what
> you hear from a BB salesman is truth.
>
> Leonard
>
>
Anonymous
April 16, 2004 3:24:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 10:14:17 -0400, "GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net>
wrote:

>BB extended service warranties are only for parts and labor, nothing more.
>I have never seen or heard anything about them doing a yearly maintenance
>service on anything they sell. Not to mention, BB uses third party services
>to do there work, so you don't know who you are dealing with. CC tells you
>that you have to 'fake' a service call for them to come out and maintenance
>it. And again CC uses third party services.

Interesting. I know the Sears extended warranty includes an annual
checkup and inside cleaning of your TV, which if you actually force
Sears to come out to your home every year for maintenence, you're
getting a pretty decent bang for your buck even if nothing
catastrophic happens to your TV during the duration of your extended
warranty.

Sears loses money on every customer under extended warranty who
actually uses this feature every year but they make money hands over
fist overall because most extended warranty customers won't make the
Sears techs perform this annual service *every* year. I usually
advise customers to buy the cheapest option (usually 2 or 3 yrs), have
the Sears techs perform one complimentary maintenence check/cleaning,
and if the TV is still in good shape a year and a half from now, call
the number and cancel the extended warranty for a full (prorated)
refund of the unused portion since most problems will occur within
that first year and a half anyway.
Anonymous
April 16, 2004 10:24:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:

>I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of a
>more costly newer tech set.
>
>Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I dont
>like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
>what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
>

Extended warranties are insurance, plain and simple. The seller
makes a lot of money on these. That means the odds are, you will
never need it. Now if you want the insurance and go into it knowing
these facts, it's totally your decision.

I never buy the extended warranty............
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 2:37:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

So if customers only buy the 2 or 3 year coverage, how do you make your 6%
that Sears says you should have? =)
I'm surprised that if you are working for Sears and they found out what you
were doing, that you wouldnt have your job for very much longer.
And also, how do you know that most problems occur in the first 2 years?
Sounds like a typical customer objection to me. Which by the way isn't true.
CC doesnt carry a 5yr plan on some items because they know that after 4 to 5
years it doesnt pay them to service the item and that's where they were
having a lot of repair issues.
It's not if the item will need repair, it's when.

Scott

"HDTV-slingr" <NOSPAMMERS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:p i1080dlop9khg3a7ps78rmlpbi17b1gou@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 10:14:17 -0400, "GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net>
> wrote:
>
> >BB extended service warranties are only for parts and labor, nothing
more.
> >I have never seen or heard anything about them doing a yearly maintenance
> >service on anything they sell. Not to mention, BB uses third party
services
> >to do there work, so you don't know who you are dealing with. CC tells
you
> >that you have to 'fake' a service call for them to come out and
maintenance
> >it. And again CC uses third party services.
>
> Interesting. I know the Sears extended warranty includes an annual
> checkup and inside cleaning of your TV, which if you actually force
> Sears to come out to your home every year for maintenence, you're
> getting a pretty decent bang for your buck even if nothing
> catastrophic happens to your TV during the duration of your extended
> warranty.
>
> Sears loses money on every customer under extended warranty who
> actually uses this feature every year but they make money hands over
> fist overall because most extended warranty customers won't make the
> Sears techs perform this annual service *every* year. I usually
> advise customers to buy the cheapest option (usually 2 or 3 yrs), have
> the Sears techs perform one complimentary maintenence check/cleaning,
> and if the TV is still in good shape a year and a half from now, call
> the number and cancel the extended warranty for a full (prorated)
> refund of the unused portion since most problems will occur within
> that first year and a half anyway.
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 2:39:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Actually insurance requires a deductable. Also, if extended warranties
aren't worth it, why are there so many service facilities?

Scott

"Paul Cardoza" <paulcardoza@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:b4n0809kicj2c14dc9de3209t5bu946p23@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:
>
> >I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of a
> >more costly newer tech set.
> >
> >Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I dont
> >like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
> >what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
> >
>
> Extended warranties are insurance, plain and simple. The seller
> makes a lot of money on these. That means the odds are, you will
> never need it. Now if you want the insurance and go into it knowing
> these facts, it's totally your decision.
>
> I never buy the extended warranty............
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 5:03:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 22:37:28 -0400, "GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net>
wrote:

>So if customers only buy the 2 or 3 year coverage, how do you make your 6%
>that Sears says you should have? =)

I'm supposed to average 7.2%. And in answer to your question, I see
myself as a TV salesman and NOT an insurance salesman. I only
recommend the extended on purchases I'd actually buy the extended on
myself. Some of us believe in 'em, some of us don't. On the small
LCD's, the projections and the plasmas, I'm definitely a believer. I
don't think I'd bother on a DLP or a CRT/Direct-View set, so I don't
push the PA on those - I tell the customer it's an option and if they
want it, fine, if they don't, fine.

>I'm surprised that if you are working for Sears and they found out what you
>were doing, that you wouldnt have your job for very much longer.

I don't *care* if Sears likes it or not, I have to balance Sears'
version of integrity and my own version of integrity. On the one
hand, my company wants me to sell protection and maintenence
agreements with every product and on the other hand, I know a P/A is a
complete waste of money on a cheap-assed TV such as a Sylvania, so I
won't push it even if my company thinks I should to increase it's
bottom line.

OTOH, I believe it's a SIN for me to sell a plasma TV without offering
and even pushing the 3-Yr P/A. The way I look at it is this - if the
customer buys an extended warranty/ PA from me, then I hand the
contract to them, they can scroll down right there on the spot and
find out about the right to cancel before a year is up and even AFTER
a complimentary service check for a FULL REFUND, or after that year is
up, for a full refund of the unused portion. Since this is a FACT,
and part of the CONTRACT, why is it even the LEAST bit "unethical" in
any way, shape or form to point this feature out to my customers?

Hey, I'm trying to build a clientele... trying to help customers out
and make them happy enough with my service, so they are comfortable
enough to recommend me to friends and family members because of my
being straight up with them... and hey - it's working :-)

>And also, how do you know that most problems occur in the first 2 years?
>Sounds like a typical customer objection to me. Which by the way isn't true.

Hey, I don't mean to state that as a fact. I clearly tell my
customers that this 1.5 (not 2) year window is what I keep hearing
again and again from the people that work on TV's. I know a bunch of
techs - some with Sears, some not. I hit every one of them who'll
talk to me up with 20 questions so I can be a better salesman, and I
hear again and again from them that if you go a year and a half with
no problems, the chances are likely that your set should be fine for
years. Any customer I pass that info onto is told where that info
came from since I don't have any data to back it up.

>CC doesnt carry a 5yr plan on some items because they know that after 4 to 5
>years it doesnt pay them to service the item and that's where they were
>having a lot of repair issues.
>It's not if the item will need repair, it's when.

Hey, Sears is the same way... you can't buy more than a 3 yr extended
warranty on any plasma TV we sell. On a (non-projection) LCD set, the
extended warranties are VERY expensive but you *can* get up to 5 Yrs.

I don't know about anybody else's extended warranties, but I know for
a fact that if you bought a 3 or 5 Yr. PA from Sears and actually had
the annual service done every year, Sears loses an average of $150 on
you (on the 5 Yr). Where Sears makes money is on all the thousands
and thousands of people who buy them and don't pick up the phone to
say "hey... time to get out here and do your annual service" every
year.... and those people greatly outnumber the ones who do.
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 5:07:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 22:39:13 -0400, "GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net>
wrote:

>Actually insurance requires a deductable. Also, if extended warranties
>aren't worth it, why are there so many service facilities?

Good question... and another question would be, if extended warranties
aren't a useful and valuable service, why don't all the manufacturers
offer more than just one year parts and labor, 2 Yrs on the picture
tube?

If the things never broke down, why doesn't Sony and Hitachi (the best
manufacturers of big screen HDTV's as far as minimal major repair
incidents) just go ahead and give you a 5 Yr parts & labor warranty
right out of the box?

There's a very good reason why they don't just GIVE you more than one
year parts and labor and this is the same very good reason extended
warranties exist.
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 11:47:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

So the manufactureres don't give you a better warranty so the retail
business can sell extended warranties? (That's what is sounds like you're
saying, but I could be wrong).

"HDTV-slingr" <NOSPAMMERS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:j5i180le29c6k9nsftf9uo0g2k566tea2o@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 22:39:13 -0400, "GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net>
> wrote:
>
> >Actually insurance requires a deductable. Also, if extended warranties
> >aren't worth it, why are there so many service facilities?
>
> Good question... and another question would be, if extended warranties
> aren't a useful and valuable service, why don't all the manufacturers
> offer more than just one year parts and labor, 2 Yrs on the picture
> tube?
>
> If the things never broke down, why doesn't Sony and Hitachi (the best
> manufacturers of big screen HDTV's as far as minimal major repair
> incidents) just go ahead and give you a 5 Yr parts & labor warranty
> right out of the box?
>
> There's a very good reason why they don't just GIVE you more than one
> year parts and labor and this is the same very good reason extended
> warranties exist.
>
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 6:04:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

GGA wrote:
> So the manufactureres don't give you a better warranty so the retail
> business can sell extended warranties? (That's what is sounds like
> you're saying, but I could be wrong).
>

One is sold, the other is given with the price of the unit.

I'm sure they know the statistics, what percentage will actually need repair
in that time frame and the average cost to repair them. That is how they
come up with the price.....


> "HDTV-slingr" <NOSPAMMERS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:j5i180le29c6k9nsftf9uo0g2k566tea2o@4ax.com...
>> On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 22:39:13 -0400, "GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Actually insurance requires a deductable. Also, if extended
>>> warranties aren't worth it, why are there so many service
>>> facilities?
>>
>> Good question... and another question would be, if extended
>> warranties aren't a useful and valuable service, why don't all the
>> manufacturers offer more than just one year parts and labor, 2 Yrs
>> on the picture tube?
>>
>> If the things never broke down, why doesn't Sony and Hitachi (the
>> best manufacturers of big screen HDTV's as far as minimal major
>> repair incidents) just go ahead and give you a 5 Yr parts & labor
>> warranty right out of the box?
>>
>> There's a very good reason why they don't just GIVE you more than one
>> year parts and labor and this is the same very good reason extended
>> warranties exist.
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 8:39:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

HDTV-slingr wrote:

> On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 22:39:13 -0400, "GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>>Actually insurance requires a deductable. Also, if extended warranties
>>aren't worth it, why are there so many service facilities?
>
>
> Good question... and another question would be, if extended warranties
> aren't a useful and valuable service, why don't all the manufacturers
> offer more than just one year parts and labor, 2 Yrs on the picture
> tube?
>
> If the things never broke down, why doesn't Sony and Hitachi (the best
> manufacturers of big screen HDTV's as far as minimal major repair
> incidents) just go ahead and give you a 5 Yr parts & labor warranty
> right out of the box?
>
> There's a very good reason why they don't just GIVE you more than one
> year parts and labor and this is the same very good reason extended
> warranties exist.
>

If extended warranties are expensive, why do so many credit cards give
them for free on virtually anything you buy?

Matthew

--
If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 12:11:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I would be very wary of anything like that. I would check the fine print on
that. I know of no one who has ever cashed out on something like that, and
I'm in the retail sales business.

Scott



>
> If extended warranties are expensive, why do so many credit cards give
> them for free on virtually anything you buy?
>
> Matthew
>
> --
> If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
>
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 1:56:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I bought a TV with my Citi platinum card and it broke after abought 15
months. And Citi reimbursed me the $189 it cost to fix it...


"GGA" <crpediem@ptdprolog.net> wrote in message
news:jKKcnfvjA4JRWhzdUSdV9g@ptd.net...
> I would be very wary of anything like that. I would check the fine print
on
> that. I know of no one who has ever cashed out on something like that, and
> I'm in the retail sales business.
>
> Scott
>
>
>
> >
> > If extended warranties are expensive, why do so many credit cards give
> > them for free on virtually anything you buy?
> >
> > Matthew
> >
> > --
> > If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
> >
>
>
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 2:39:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 21:56:11 -0400, "Tracy Bass" <tbass@oco.net>
wrote:

>I bought a TV with my Citi platinum card and it broke after abought 15
>months. And Citi reimbursed me the $189 it cost to fix it...

Interesting... I've always just shrugged off the extended warranties
from the credit card companies with a grain of salt. It's good to
know at least Citi's seems to be straight up, at least with your
*small* purchase. I wonder however; if it would be so easy if you had
a problem with a $3000 tv.
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 6:41:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

GGA wrote:
> I would be very wary of anything like that. I would check the fine
> print on that. I know of no one who has ever cashed out on something
> like that, and I'm in the retail sales business.
>
> Scott

I have an extended on my fridge. I've used it 4 times. Knock on wood, I
think it's finally fixed, but if not, I have 3 years to go!!!

>
>
>
>>
>> If extended warranties are expensive, why do so many credit cards
>> give them for free on virtually anything you buy?
>>
>> Matthew
>>
>> --
>> If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
April 18, 2004 8:05:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 02:41:14 GMT, "L Alpert" <alpertl@xxcomcast.net>
wrote:

>GGA wrote:
>> I would be very wary of anything like that. I would check the fine
>> print on that. I know of no one who has ever cashed out on something
>> like that, and I'm in the retail sales business.
>>
>> Scott
>
>I have an extended on my fridge. I've used it 4 times. Knock on wood, I
>think it's finally fixed, but if not, I have 3 years to go!!!
>

You must have gotten a real dog. Refrigerators are generally problem
free for as long as 20 years.
Thumper
>>
>>
>>
>>>
>>> If extended warranties are expensive, why do so many credit cards
>>> give them for free on virtually anything you buy?
>>>
>>> Matthew
>>>
>>> --
>>> If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
>
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 11:48:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Problem free for 20 years?
99% of my customers for fridges had there fridge last less than 12 years.

Scott

"> >
>
> You must have gotten a real dog. Refrigerators are generally problem
> free for as long as 20 years.
> Thumper
> >>
> >>
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 5:27:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

HDTV-slingr wrote:
> On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 21:56:11 -0400, "Tracy Bass" <tbass@oco.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>>I bought a TV with my Citi platinum card and it broke after abought 15
>>months. And Citi reimbursed me the $189 it cost to fix it...
>
>
> Interesting... I've always just shrugged off the extended warranties
> from the credit card companies with a grain of salt. It's good to
> know at least Citi's seems to be straight up, at least with your
> *small* purchase. I wonder however; if it would be so easy if you had
> a problem with a $3000 tv.

The reason that credit cards are willing to provide a warranty extension
is good marketing at very low cost. Virtually anything that is well
designed and made have a similar failure curve when measured over a
large sample. It's called a bathtub curve. There is a relative high rate
of failure in "infant mortality", the drain end of the bathtub. This
period is covered under almost all manufacturer's warranties. Then there
is a long period with a very low rate of failure, the bottom of the
bathtub. The failure rate then increases as the product reaches end of
life, the other end of the bathtub.

The credit card and "extended" warranties cover the bottom of the
bathtub, so the cost of fixing everything that fails is low. It's really
low when compared to the premiums collected or the credit card companies
wouldn't give the service away for free.

Matthew

--
If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 5:31:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

GGA wrote:
(top posting corrected)

>
>>You must have gotten a real dog. Refrigerators are generally problem
>>free for as long as 20 years.
>>Thumper
>>

> Problem free for 20 years?
> 99% of my customers for fridges had there fridge last less than 12 years.

That's far more typical. My fridge is 10 years old and I've had to
repair the door liner and several of the drawers. They used to be made
of sturdier materials and 15 to 20 years probably wasn't that unusual in
years past. The fridge that I replaced was old enough to have a Ford
logo on it. I figure it was 20-25 years old at the time. It could have
been repaired, but why?

Matthew
--
If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
April 18, 2004 6:32:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 13:31:18 GMT, "Matthew L. Martin"
<mlmartin@me.com> wrote:

>GGA wrote:
>(top posting corrected)
>
>>
>>>You must have gotten a real dog. Refrigerators are generally problem
>>>free for as long as 20 years.
>>>Thumper
>>>
>
>> Problem free for 20 years?
>> 99% of my customers for fridges had there fridge last less than 12 years.
>
And the ones who did not come in could have them for 25 years.
Thumper

>That's far more typical. My fridge is 10 years old and I've had to
>repair the door liner and several of the drawers. They used to be made
>of sturdier materials and 15 to 20 years probably wasn't that unusual in
>years past. The fridge that I replaced was old enough to have a Ford
>logo on it. I figure it was 20-25 years old at the time. It could have
>been repaired, but why?
>
>Matthew
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 6:35:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:c5mjpi$95u$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
> I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of a
> more costly newer tech set.
>
> Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I dont
> like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to know
> what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...

Independently of the economics of the topic there's the piece of mind issue.
When I get something new that's high tech and prone to durability issues, I
think it's very reassuring to have a 2 or 3 yr plan. The dissappointment
and aggravation you face with a breakdown (and no plan) as well as the
expense don't seem worth the chance IMHO.
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 7:01:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thumper wrote:
> On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 02:41:14 GMT, "L Alpert" <alpertl@xxcomcast.net>
> wrote:
>
>> GGA wrote:
>>> I would be very wary of anything like that. I would check the fine
>>> print on that. I know of no one who has ever cashed out on something
>>> like that, and I'm in the retail sales business.
>>>
>>> Scott
>>
>> I have an extended on my fridge. I've used it 4 times. Knock on
>> wood, I think it's finally fixed, but if not, I have 3 years to go!!!
>>
>
> You must have gotten a real dog. Refrigerators are generally problem
> free for as long as 20 years.
> Thumper

Yep, I think so. Little failures like a temp sensor for the defrost cycle
(2 trips to figure that one out), some type of passage valve between the
sides of the fridge, a feed tube for the ice maker freezing.

Must have been made on a Friday afternoon or a Monday morning.....



>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> If extended warranties are expensive, why do so many credit cards
>>>> give them for free on virtually anything you buy?
>>>>
>>>> Matthew
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> If the war in Iraq was over oil, we lost.
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 1:14:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew L. Martin" <mlmartin@me.com> wrote in message
news:c5eee401086dfd61bec026be15b875a3@news.teranews.com...
> HDTV-slingr wrote:
> > On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 21:56:11 -0400, "Tracy Bass" <tbass@oco.net>
> > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>I bought a TV with my Citi platinum card and it broke after abought 15
> >>months. And Citi reimbursed me the $189 it cost to fix it...
> >
> >
> > Interesting... I've always just shrugged off the extended warranties
> > from the credit card companies with a grain of salt. It's good to
> > know at least Citi's seems to be straight up, at least with your
> > *small* purchase. I wonder however; if it would be so easy if you had
> > a problem with a $3000 tv.
>
> The reason that credit cards are willing to provide a warranty extension
> is good marketing at very low cost. Virtually anything that is well
> designed and made have a similar failure curve when measured over a
> large sample. It's called a bathtub curve. There is a relative high rate
> of failure in "infant mortality", the drain end of the bathtub. This
> period is covered under almost all manufacturer's warranties. Then there
> is a long period with a very low rate of failure, the bottom of the
> bathtub. The failure rate then increases as the product reaches end of
> life, the other end of the bathtub.
>
> The credit card and "extended" warranties cover the bottom of the
> bathtub, so the cost of fixing everything that fails is low. It's really
> low when compared to the premiums collected or the credit card companies
> wouldn't give the service away for free.
>
> Matthew

Exactly correct, and the reason that you won't find very many extended
warranties that will be offered to continue after 5 years. Extended
warranty companies generally make a pretty good profit. If they don't they
go out of business and resurface under another name and the customer is out
of luck.

You have to compare the risk of repair, including the likely cost of a
repair with the cost of the warranty and the replacement of the product.
Newer technologies like DLP, LCD, LCOS, and PDP are generally much more
expensive to service and most repairs are done by replacing entire circuit
boards or even entire light engines or panels. While the reliability with
most of these sets has been relatively high, the cost of a repair is much
more likely to be catastrophic. Many of the warranty companies have not
figured this out yet, so the warranties may be a very good value. You have
to read the fine print, do the homework on repair costs and repair
facilities, and shop agressively.

For more conventional technologies these warranties are often not as great a
value and I rarely buy them unless they are ridiculously generous. I bought
one on a PDA/cell phone from circuit city for my wife that covered
everything, including the batteries and physical damage for $60/2 years on a
$500 phone. She has had 4 phones, including an upgrade to a new model, and
a replacement for a phone that got left on top of the van and ended up in a
busy intersection. The cost of a single battery is more than the warranty
so it did not make sense not to get it. It is the only warranty that I have
bought in years.

Leonard
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 2:14:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

well it was a $2000 TV but was only a software problem so cheap to fix.


"HDTV-slingr" <NOSPAMMERS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ivt3805l5ip7cb7i2n623gbutqm82o511o@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 21:56:11 -0400, "Tracy Bass" <tbass@oco.net>
> wrote:
>
> >I bought a TV with my Citi platinum card and it broke after abought 15
> >months. And Citi reimbursed me the $189 it cost to fix it...
>
> Interesting... I've always just shrugged off the extended warranties
> from the credit card companies with a grain of salt. It's good to
> know at least Citi's seems to be straight up, at least with your
> *small* purchase. I wonder however; if it would be so easy if you had
> a problem with a $3000 tv.
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 11:00:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....

As stated before, have worked in retail mgt for over 20 years.... 3
1/2 of them as General Manager of Best Buy... there IS NO MAITNANCE
CLAUSE in any TV warr. Only on VCR/Camcorder (cleaning only)

If you doubt me... try to schedule one!


On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 19:53:59 GMT, "mr E" <jimmmmmmmm@jim.com> wrote:

>
>"Jason" <none@none.com> wrote in message
>news:c5mno5$bhi$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
>>
>> <modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>> news:idnt70l0g0qeqf8p8g1mi9tj97gch77k60@4ax.com...
>> > Can YOU fix it???
>> >
>> > HD is still very new tech, the chances of you using the warr is about
>> > 100%. I would never buy the following without a EW
>> >
>> > 1. Camcorder
>> > 2. Laptop (as long as battery/screen is covered)
>> > 3. Big screen
>> >
>> > I have been in retail mgt for 28 years... you wont lose $$ if you use
>> > the warr. Just be sure to USE IT when something goes wrong.
>> >
>> > Small issues become big repairs. Without the warr you ignore the small
>> > issues until they become big ones.. then they are to expensive to
>> > repair
>> >
>> > On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 13:21:13 -0500, "Jason" <none@none.com> wrote:
>> >
>> > >I have decided to get a Sony 57" 510, 550 or 600 series RPTV instead of
>a
>> > >more costly newer tech set.
>> > >
>> > >Now, do people here recommend an extended warranty on such a set? I
>dont
>> > >like the idea of giving them 300-500 bucks for air, but I wanted to
>know
>> > >what experiences others have had with a standard CRT set...
>> > >
>> >
>>
>> Right, which is why I consider a 10% price point. I would like to buy
>one,
>> but why pay so much money? I used to sell them at Best Buy so I do know
>> somethign about them. There is always a small chance something will go
>> wrong. Whats repair on these... 200 to 500 bucks? What are the chances
>> that I will need a repair like this within 3 or 4 years, 3 or 4%? My dad
>> has a first generation VERY new technology 65" Toshiba, and never had
>> problems, I have a 32" HDTV and no problems after a year.
>>
>> Could something happen? Sure, will it? I dunno, thats the gamble, and I
>> really dont like to gamble more than 10% of the cost..
>>
>>
>
>Apparently, unless I was misinformed or I misunderstood, the Best Buy
>service plan that I purchased with my 57h83 Toshiba this past January covers
>a yearly tech visit for maintenance, such as aligning the crt's convergence
>and such. I am actually not sure if its "yearly" or specifically "when you
>need it," but if it is indeed, "when I need it" then I am sure that it could
>use a bit of tweaking each year by a professional. A nice feature in
>addition to the complete 4 year protection that the plan offers. If I had
>kids or a dog right now, I would be even more worried about something
>happening, but as it is, we're always having people over, and they are
>sometimes (usually) inebriated...so having a protection plan just means a
>bit more peace of mind for me. I wouldn't get the TV without it.
>
>Matt
>
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 12:58:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:nfi980tt2elkuj3sag1b9jq7kqs8soo0pl@4ax.com...
> NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....
>
> As stated before, have worked in retail mgt for over 20 years.... 3
> 1/2 of them as General Manager of Best Buy... there IS NO MAITNANCE
> CLAUSE in any TV warr. Only on VCR/Camcorder (cleaning only)
>
> If you doubt me... try to schedule one!

What is to keep someone from complaining about bad convergence or just poor
clarity in the pix? So the tech comes out and adjusts the convergence and
focus and cleans the lenses. Do they pay or not? Actually, most companies
will pay for this kind of service, even if it is not specified in the
contract. It is rather silly to request it if there is not a problem and it
is likely that few people do, just like many people never use the warranties
because they forget the bought it.

Leonard
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 6:02:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

YOU WILL HAVE A "NPF (no prfoblem found)" and it will not be covered.
The reason for this is that BBY has a 4th time in service=
replacement. If they let you do that then there is nothing stopping
you from getting a new TV by using "made up repairs".


On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 20:58:38 -0400, "Leonard Caillouet"
<lcaillonospam@devoynet.com> wrote:

>
><modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>news:nfi980tt2elkuj3sag1b9jq7kqs8soo0pl@4ax.com...
>> NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....NOPE....
>>
>> As stated before, have worked in retail mgt for over 20 years.... 3
>> 1/2 of them as General Manager of Best Buy... there IS NO MAITNANCE
>> CLAUSE in any TV warr. Only on VCR/Camcorder (cleaning only)
>>
>> If you doubt me... try to schedule one!
>
>What is to keep someone from complaining about bad convergence or just poor
>clarity in the pix? So the tech comes out and adjusts the convergence and
>focus and cleans the lenses. Do they pay or not? Actually, most companies
>will pay for this kind of service, even if it is not specified in the
>contract. It is rather silly to request it if there is not a problem and it
>is likely that few people do, just like many people never use the warranties
>because they forget the bought it.
>
>Leonard
>
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 3:25:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:4p9e80thncmpfq6ok78mh9jln2ksulvlfn@4ax.com...
> YOU WILL HAVE A "NPF (no prfoblem found)" and it will not be covered.
> The reason for this is that BBY has a 4th time in service=
> replacement. If they let you do that then there is nothing stopping
> you from getting a new TV by using "made up repairs".

This is what would happen in my shop, except that the customer would pay for
the nuisance call if there was no problem. Of course we would clarify this
with them up front. My point is that the way most servicers work is that
they wouldn't think twice about fiing a claim on something like this and the
warranty company would never know. We do not do business this way and our
clients are much more well educated by our staff about what is covered and
what is not. In fact, we rarely sell warranties becasue they are usually
not a good value. Also, if the set does need adjustment, and it is
something that is beyond the consumer controls, most warranty companies will
pay for the service. They degree to which these gray areas will be covered
depends on the warranty company and the servicer doing the work. Many of
the better companies are very liberal about paying for this kind of service.
One should always check with the servicer BEFORE buying the warranty to find
out what ind of history the warranty company has regarding support and
paying up.

Leonard
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 2:20:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

YOU GOT IT TOYOTA... Read the contract... DO NOT depend on the
information that a "BBY Blue shirt" gives you. Its not there fault,
they tell you what they have been told to tell you. There managers are
bonused on PSP % big time (and punished for bad %). And its very easy
to just "handle the situation" of a "maitnance call" after you have
made $$. When in doubt, read, ask questions and get on this forum and
get the SKINNY!




On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 11:25:59 -0400, "Leonard G. Caillouet"
<lcaillo_ns_@devoynet.com> wrote:

>
><modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>news:4p9e80thncmpfq6ok78mh9jln2ksulvlfn@4ax.com...
>> YOU WILL HAVE A "NPF (no prfoblem found)" and it will not be covered.
>> The reason for this is that BBY has a 4th time in service=
>> replacement. If they let you do that then there is nothing stopping
>> you from getting a new TV by using "made up repairs".
>
>This is what would happen in my shop, except that the customer would pay for
>the nuisance call if there was no problem. Of course we would clarify this
>with them up front. My point is that the way most servicers work is that
>they wouldn't think twice about fiing a claim on something like this and the
>warranty company would never know. We do not do business this way and our
>clients are much more well educated by our staff about what is covered and
>what is not. In fact, we rarely sell warranties becasue they are usually
>not a good value. Also, if the set does need adjustment, and it is
>something that is beyond the consumer controls, most warranty companies will
>pay for the service. They degree to which these gray areas will be covered
>depends on the warranty company and the servicer doing the work. Many of
>the better companies are very liberal about paying for this kind of service.
>One should always check with the servicer BEFORE buying the warranty to find
>out what ind of history the warranty company has regarding support and
>paying up.
>
>Leonard
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 12:17:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:41hg80dja796ljdu880r4u10qffmjm1el2@4ax.com...
> YOU GOT IT TOYOTA... Read the contract... DO NOT depend on the
> information that a "BBY Blue shirt" gives you. Its not there fault,
> they tell you what they have been told to tell you. There managers are
> bonused on PSP % big time (and punished for bad %). And its very easy
> to just "handle the situation" of a "maitnance call" after you have
> made $$. When in doubt, read, ask questions and get on this forum and
> get the SKINNY!

BBY Blue shirt?
PSP%?

What are you talking about?

Leonard
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 9:25:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

BBY Blue shirt= Product specialist (non-commission)

PSP% Product service plan (the topic in question)

On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 08:17:09 -0400, "Leonard Caillouet"
<lcaillonospam@devoynet.com> wrote:

>
><modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>news:41hg80dja796ljdu880r4u10qffmjm1el2@4ax.com...
>> YOU GOT IT TOYOTA... Read the contract... DO NOT depend on the
>> information that a "BBY Blue shirt" gives you. Its not there fault,
>> they tell you what they have been told to tell you. There managers are
>> bonused on PSP % big time (and punished for bad %). And its very easy
>> to just "handle the situation" of a "maitnance call" after you have
>> made $$. When in doubt, read, ask questions and get on this forum and
>> get the SKINNY!
>
>BBY Blue shirt?
>PSP%?
>
>What are you talking about?
>
>Leonard
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 9:25:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:ffuj80tu4h9tumbjouohi0q7ss2eab52tv@4ax.com...
> BBY Blue shirt= Product specialist (non-commission)
>
> PSP% Product service plan (the topic in question)
>

That's what I thought. My comments were focused on the application of the
extended warranty and the warranty itself. Once sold, the salesman, or PSP
in your words, has nothing to do with whether something is covered. In
fact, salesmen know very little about what goes on when service becomes
necessary. This is why I make the point repeatedly that the consumer needs
to get to know the people who will actually fix the product, both under the
manufacturer's warranty and the extended warranty. By doing so he/she has
to rely less on the (typically) poorly informed, perhaps outright deceitful
sales staff.

Leonard
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 10:30:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>This is why I make the point repeatedly that the consumer needs
>to get to know the people who will actually fix the product"

Not going to happen in most cases. I sold Ext Warr for my own buiss,
Best buy and The Good Guys (west coast only). If there was a service
issue it was called in and "jobbed out" to the next guy on the list.
The problem is that in the process of selling Ext Warr the sales
person is going to present all the coverage that the "normal limited
warr" doesnt cover. In some cases this "extra coverage" is exaggerated
or just totaly misrep'ed. The servicer isint going to do anything that
he cant get paid for. And "periodic maint" is not going to be paid for
by the Ext. Warr company. Keep in mind, the only way an Ext Warr is
profitable is if there is no service claims on the item. So they are
going to lean on the NPF (No problem found) when you call and nothing
can be found wrong.

Few NPF issues..
1. Dirt (we all have it and its NOT an service issue)
2. Alingment (thats why you have those adjustments available, it
happens adjust and go on with life)
3. Picture is "out of focus" (sounds like wear and tear, nothing is
new forever)
4. Moved the unit now its messed up (your problem, we cant come out
and set it up every time you vacume)
5. Cant get a picture (if you cant hook it up (or re-hook it up) then
you are out of luck, charged service call)

These are JUST A VERY FEW of the answers I have heard from national
servicers (3rd party most of the time) when trying to help a customer
service issue.

The only option left the manager is to replace the unit and the eat
the profit.. THAT = LESS BONUS.. NOT GOING TO HAPPEN
On Sat, 24 Apr 2004 01:31:34 -0400, "Leonard Caillouet"
<lcaillonospam@devoynet.com> wrote:

>
><modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>news:ffuj80tu4h9tumbjouohi0q7ss2eab52tv@4ax.com...
>> BBY Blue shirt= Product specialist (non-commission)
>>
>> PSP% Product service plan (the topic in question)
>>
>
>That's what I thought. My comments were focused on the application of the
>extended warranty and the warranty itself. Once sold, the salesman, or PSP
>in your words, has nothing to do with whether something is covered. In
>fact, salesmen know very little about what goes on when service becomes
>necessary. This is why I make the point repeatedly that the consumer needs
>to get to know the people who will actually fix the product, both under the
>manufacturer's warranty and the extended warranty. By doing so he/she has
>to rely less on the (typically) poorly informed, perhaps outright deceitful
>sales staff.
>
>Leonard
>
Anonymous
April 26, 2004 1:17:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<modestoman@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:mjbl8014r6rn73fvc32ieqc226f99e0opp@4ax.com...
> >This is why I make the point repeatedly that the consumer needs
> >to get to know the people who will actually fix the product"
>
> Not going to happen in most cases. I sold Ext Warr for my own buiss,

Of course, most people don't, but there is no reason that they should not be
able to talk to the servicer before making a purchase. A warrranty has to
have support of local servicers or it is worth nothing. Not all warranties
are the same and not all servicers provide high quality service. The smart
consumer will find out who he has to deal with before making a committment.

> Best buy and The Good Guys (west coast only). If there was a service
> issue it was called in and "jobbed out" to the next guy on the list.
> The problem is that in the process of selling Ext Warr the sales
> person is going to present all the coverage that the "normal limited
> warr" doesnt cover. In some cases this "extra coverage" is exaggerated
> or just totaly misrep'ed. The servicer isint going to do anything that
> he cant get paid for. And "periodic maint" is not going to be paid for
> by the Ext. Warr company. Keep in mind, the only way an Ext Warr is
> profitable is if there is no service claims on the item. So they are
> going to lean on the NPF (No problem found) when you call and nothing
> can be found wrong.

My point is that if you are concerned about service level alignments that
might need to be done on a CRT based RPTV, this might be considered periodic
maintenence or it might be considered service. In most cases manufacturers
consider it service, valid for a warranty claim, if the adjustments are not
available in the consumer level menus.

> Few NPF issues..
> 1. Dirt (we all have it and its NOT an service issue)

Some warranties used to cover cleaning. Most these days do not, but again,
some may if the cleaning is not external and affects the picture.

> 2. Alingment (thats why you have those adjustments available, it
> happens adjust and go on with life)

Like I said, if it is outside of the consumer level adjustments, it is
normally considered to be valid service. Once again, check it out and KNOW
rather than speculating or generalizing.

> 3. Picture is "out of focus" (sounds like wear and tear, nothing is
> new forever)

Lots of valid service relates to this complaint. Any warranty company who
automatically rejects this complaint code would be out of business before
long (many do go this route...)

> 4. Moved the unit now its messed up (your problem, we cant come out
> and set it up every time you vacume)

The complaint could be due to a coolant leak or bad solder joints caused by
moving the set. Actually very common problems on several brands over the
last 10 years or so. This would not automatically exclude warranty
coverage.

> 5. Cant get a picture (if you cant hook it up (or re-hook it up) then
> you are out of luck, charged service call)

Need I repeat myself or do you get the point?

>
> These are JUST A VERY FEW of the answers I have heard from national
> servicers (3rd party most of the time) when trying to help a customer
> service issue.

Then you are dealing with the wrong warranty companies and the wrong
servicers.

> The only option left the manager is to replace the unit and the eat
> the profit.. THAT = LESS BONUS.. NOT GOING TO HAPPEN

The other option is to do your homework before buying, either as a consumer
or as a dealer. Warranties are sometimes good values, generally not. When
they are backed by a reputable company, supported by a good quality dealer
and service center, cover what is desired, and the price is reasonable to
ofset a high cost risk, then they should be considered. If all you have to
go on is the BS, speculation, and generalizations of a salesman it is not
worth even considering.

Leonard
!