Suggestions for Wired router for heavy p2p usage

Hello, I’m new here and was hoping to get helpful suggestions on a good wired p2p router.

My old router at my house, an Efficient Network Speedstream 5861 (awesome router while it worked), died recently and I need a replacement router because the POS old d-link router my father’s friend gave him is constantly lagging and needing to be restarted. I don’t need a wireless router because there are ports in the house already and we have a linksys WAP.

I used my old router heavily for bittorrent, connecting up to several thousand peers. I’m trying to avoid the expensive routers ( >$100) because I just need a reliable p2p wired router. No special features. Port forwarding and the ability to stay stable connecting to a thousand or so people are the only two things I desire. I’m willing to use modified firmware if necessary to make a router better, but I just want a router that doesn’t need to be restarted constantly, like the d-link I’m currently using.

Looking for any suggestions, hopefully those that don’t get into building your own router from an old computer…
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  1. The sole reason I went to bussiness class router.

    My setup is similar to yours router + AP.

    Try to pick up a Netgear FVS338 router. These normal sell for around $200, but. Everynow and then you find used one on ebay for <$100. I picked up a new one for 125 on ebay.

    The Netgear is a 8 port VPN router, throughput is 92mbps on all ports and directions.

    The 328 model only has 62 mbps throughput. I have both. The 338 is faster.
  2. Quote:
    The sole reason I went to bussiness class router.

    My setup is similar to yours router + AP.

    Try to pick up a Netgear FVS338 router. These normal sell for around $200, but. Everynow and then you find used one on ebay for <$100. I picked up a new one for 125 on ebay.

    The Netgear is a 8 port VPN router, throughput is 92mbps on all ports and directions.

    The 328 model only has 62 mbps throughput. I have both. The 338 is faster.


    Thanks for the suggestion. I kinda figured I'd have to get a business class router to get another rock-solid stable connection. I'll definitely have to look into that model. However, are there any similar 4-port versions of the Netgear VNP model you suggested or other 4-port routers you or other people could suggest? I don't exaclty want to pay for the extra 4 ports considering I already have several Netgear hubs in use.
  3. They have them but I never ever look at them. I require 7 ports for all of my hardware. The last # on the model is for ports. So change it to a 4. But I think most bussiness router are 8 ports. But they do make a gigaport router that is 4 ports. Not aware of the speed.
  4. I've been trying to find an acceptable router/server for p2p and moderate network load for years. I've tried every manufacturer of home/small business servers under a grand (D-Link, Linksys, Trendnet, Belkin, netgear, etc) and multiple models of each. At one time I went to Comp USA and just took home one router after another to see if they would work and took most back after they have locked up within a few days. The best I hoped to expect was for one to last multiple days and not burn up like netgears did. I've had so many overheat that had been installing little electrical fans on the last three over the last two years to keep them cool. The best I could hope for where ones that would go a few days before requiring a reset. For the last year, I’ve had an wall socket timer to reset the router every morning at 4am. The last a best one was a trendnet that lasted almost a year before it began to lock up every few hours. In the end, they all give in. They are not made for real network traffic.

    The fact is that all of the advertising in the ads and on the packages of every home/small business router sold is a pack of lies. They cannot take 200 computers, cannot carry heavy traffic and manage VPN and wireless flawlessly, and certainly cannot handle p2p. These manufacturers don’t expect these devices to be used for more than a few computers net surfing or gaming and everyone else is just out of luck. If you have a good router working for you now for p2p and/or moderate traffic, just wait see what happen in the long term. If you want to upgrade, you’ll be throwing the dice again and you will probably be disappointed. The bottom line is that they will simply not have enough memory and/or adequate cooling to handle the load. The ASUS p2p router with the extra memory may be able to do the trick but there is a better, simple solution.

    Here is the answer: Unless to want to drop a grand or more for a Cisco or such, there is one answer that is cheaper than most of these routers: Buy an old small form factor PC with 256M of memory and two PCI slots. Many have a 10/100 NIC built in. Stick in another NIC, A gigabit NIC if you wish, and load Smoothwall express for free. Then you will have a commercial grade Linux router as good as the Ciscos and you don’t need to know anything about Linux. Your biggest problem will be picking a NIC card that smoothwall has drivers for so buy them locally so you can take them back. Stay away from 3com or other realtek cards. I recommend the trendnet gigabit. Take your useless wireless router and put it on the network in pass thru mode. It can probably handle that. With that, all of your problems will be over for under $100. It can do more than most routers out there and it’s bulletproof. That it: there is no better or easier solution. My network runs flawlessly and better protection and logging than ever before. It was so cheap I've made a spare in case the current one breaks. I have tried and you just can't break it. You can buy a switch for it with as many ports as you need. Trendnet 8 port switches run $30 which can still keep the total cost under $100. it's a no brainer.

    Pass the word around.
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