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OTA in San Jose. Is my existing antenna good enough?

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Anonymous
April 17, 2004 11:45:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

We have already picked-out the hd-ready tv (a Sony KV32HS510) and will
be getting it soon. The antenna on the roof that we've been using for
years is connected to a 10-foot mast with a rotor. The signal is
brought into the house via a 75-ohm cable. All UHF, VHF, and FM
stations come in nice and clear with a few exceptions. If it's really
stormy in San Francisco channels 2 and 36 are sometimes not quite as
clear but all-in-all, excellent reception. I believe we are about 50
miles or so from the transmission towers. I'd really hate to buy the tv
and the HDTV receiver only to find out that the antenna is not good
enough and then have to purcase a new antenna as well. Is there anyway
of determing beforehand the adequacy of the antenna. It's been so long
since we purchased it that I don't have any information on model or
specs. BTW, we rarely use the rotor aspect of the antenna because where
we have it pointed now, it's quite good even at night or when the
weather is stormy. Thanks.

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Anonymous
April 19, 2004 5:01:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Otto Pylot" <otto@bogus.address.invalid> wrote in message
news:170420041742383518%otto@bogus.address.invalid...
> We have already picked-out the hd-ready tv (a Sony KV32HS510) and will
> be getting it soon. The antenna on the roof that we've been using for
> years is connected to a 10-foot mast with a rotor. The signal is
> brought into the house via a 75-ohm cable. All UHF, VHF, and FM
> stations come in nice and clear with a few exceptions. If it's really
> stormy in San Francisco channels 2 and 36 are sometimes not quite as
> clear but all-in-all, excellent reception. I believe we are about 50
> miles or so from the transmission towers. I'd really hate to buy the tv
> and the HDTV receiver only to find out that the antenna is not good
> enough and then have to purcase a new antenna as well. Is there anyway
> of determing beforehand the adequacy of the antenna.

Buy the HD tuner with a return policy in case it doesn't work. Hook it up to
your regular TV/VCR with the composite connection to determine that you get
reception. (No it will not be HDTV, but you will be able to confirm
reception and still watch all channels you get) If you do get decent, get
the HDTV, if not, get a new antenna or bring the tuner back.

> It's been so long
> since we purchased it that I don't have any information on model or
> specs. BTW, we rarely use the rotor aspect of the antenna because where
> we have it pointed now, it's quite good even at night or when the
> weather is stormy. Thanks.

New antennas are not that expensive. You may want an amplifier.

Brad H
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 11:36:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <c61b6v$6u4$1@news01.intel.com>, Brad Houser
<bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:

> "Otto Pylot" <otto@bogus.address.invalid> wrote in message
> news:170420041742383518%otto@bogus.address.invalid...
>
<snip>

>
> > It's been so long
> > since we purchased it that I don't have any information on model or
> > specs. BTW, we rarely use the rotor aspect of the antenna because where
> > we have it pointed now, it's quite good even at night or when the
> > weather is stormy. Thanks.
>
> New antennas are not that expensive. You may want an amplifier.
>
Ah, you anticipated my second question. I saw a Motorola Signal Booster
Boradband Drop Amp at Circuit City yesterday. I think it was something
like 52 - 1000MHz but I didn't write down what that was. Do those
really work or do they just amplify the bad signal and make it worse?
IOW, will it remove the wavy lines that Channel 2 (Fox OTA) sometimes
has. Thanks.
>
>

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Please reply to: scasse@invalid.net replacing invalid with sonic.
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Anonymous
April 20, 2004 8:36:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Otto Pylot" <otto@bogus.address.invalid> wrote in message > > New antennas
are not that expensive. You may want an amplifier.
> >
> Ah, you anticipated my second question. I saw a Motorola Signal Booster
> Boradband Drop Amp at Circuit City yesterday. I think it was something
> like 52 - 1000MHz but I didn't write down what that was. Do those
> really work or do they just amplify the bad signal and make it worse?
> IOW, will it remove the wavy lines that Channel 2 (Fox OTA) sometimes
> has. Thanks.
> >
> >

Yes. It would help with fringe areas, which San Jose is. I don't know about
channel 2 as the low frequency of the channel subjects it to a lot of
interference from other sources. This is one of the reasons why there is no
longer a VHF channel 1.

Brad Houser
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 6:28:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I JUST did this, I live by Union and 87 in San Jose. I took my old TV
antenna ovt of the garage, literally laid it on the roof - jvst estimated
the direction to point, and it worked great!.. got 15 channels picked vp
vsing the Samsvng 360 receiver. WOW - now with a good UHF antenna, it'll
work great!.. went to Frys, paid $50 for Channelmaster 4335 (I think this is
the nvmber, a large 3'x3' antenna - also called 8-bay bowtie) - set it vp on
a mast, pointed in the general direction - did not work good at all - very
directional I think.. tweaked several times, still not as good as the old TV
antenna. Took the Channel Master back, vp goes the old antenna, laying on
the roof.. it's still there, and I'm happy. Oh, my little antenna is a
smaller one, 45' long I think, and abovt $30.. and from looking at the
pictvres, it's the 3016 Channelmaster..

I don't think yov will have any problems

Scott



"Otto Pylot" <otto@bogvs.address.invalid> wrote in message
news:170420041742383518%otto@bogvs.address.invalid...
> We have already picked-ovt the hd-ready tv (a Sony KV32HS510) and will
> be getting it soon. The antenna on the roof that we've been vsing for
> years is connected to a 10-foot mast with a rotor. The signal is
> brovght into the hovse via a 75-ohm cable. All UHF, VHF, and FM
> stations come in nice and clear with a few exceptions. If it's really
> stormy in San Francisco channels 2 and 36 are sometimes not qvite as
> clear bvt all-in-all, excellent reception. I believe we are abovt 50
> miles or so from the transmission towers. I'd really hate to bvy the tv
> and the HDTV receiver only to find ovt that the antenna is not good
> enovgh and then have to pvrcase a new antenna as well. Is there anyway
> of determing beforehand the adeqvacy of the antenna. It's been so long
> since we pvrchased it that I don't have any information on model or
> specs. BTW, we rarely vse the rotor aspect of the antenna becavse where
> we have it pointed now, it's qvite good even at night or when the
> weather is stormy. Thanks.
>
> --
> Deja Moo: I've seen this bvllshit before.
>
> My address has been anti-spammed.
> Please reply to: scasse@invalid.net replacing invalid with sonic.
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 3:07:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <c64c64$mrn$1@news01.intel.com>, Brad Houser
<bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:

> "Otto Pylot" <otto@bogus.address.invalid> wrote in message > > New antennas
> are not that expensive. You may want an amplifier.

><snip>

> Yes. It would help with fringe areas, which San Jose is. I don't know about
> channel 2 as the low frequency of the channel subjects it to a lot of
> interference from other sources. This is one of the reasons why there is no
> longer a VHF channel 1.
>


Thankyou. Think I will give it a try this weekend. I'll post my results.

--
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My address has been anti-spammed.
Please reply to: scasse@invalid.net replacing invalid with sonic.
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