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HD Tube TV as Computer Monitor

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Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 18, 2004 4:52:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have seen some 30" Widescreen HD Tube TVs with DVI inputs for around
$1000.
Is it possible to use these as computer monitors?

I would like to connect the cable signal to my computer. These TV seem like
an affordable option compare to the flat panel monitors.

Thanks,
Carlos

More about : tube computer monitor

Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 18, 2004 1:11:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <wjkgc.480733$Po1.435918@twister.tampabay.rr.com>,
"Carlos Andrade" <candrade1@cfl.rr.com> wrote:

> I have seen some 30" Widescreen HD Tube TVs with DVI inputs for around
> $1000.
> Is it possible to use these as computer monitors?
>
> I would like to connect the cable signal to my computer. These TV seem like
> an affordable option compare to the flat panel monitors.

HD uses different scan rates. This is partly intentional, to keep
people from using consumer large HD sets instead of more expensive large
computer monitors. And then there is the issue of overscan with tube
monitors.

What you can get depends entirely on the TV, your video card, and
whether you have software like Powerstrip (which I don't use, so don't
ask me about it) to make custom scan rates.

Sony 4:3 Trinitons (32" and above, the ones with the memory stick slot)
can handle a 640x480 VGA scan rate through the DVI input, but not 25x80
VGA text mode. And even after adjusting for overscan in the service
menu (which is still less than perfect around the edges), the TV still
will not display the first few lines of the picture because they would
normally be the special vertical retrace interval signals in a regular
TV signal. Still, I'm happy because the picture detail, especially with
badly contrasting colors, is so much better than with S-video.

It is possible under unknown circumstances (probably relating to the use
of S-video) to get an ATI card to scale a 640x480 signal into a smaller
window (it did this when I first got the TV), but the scaling effects
are very noticable.

Oddly, the same set, when hooked up to my Powerbook's DVI output, goes
into 1080i widescreen mode and offers no other modes.

I'm really disappointed that video card manufacturers don't seem to have
any interest in making cards for the Home Theatre crowd, and instead
either go for hardcore gamers or for people who want to watch TV on
their computer. I simply want a video card which will let me output the
various standard ATSC scan rates (especially the 4:3 ones) through a DVI
output.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 19, 2004 3:51:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Carlos Andrade" <candrade1@cfl.rr.com> wrote in message
news:wjkgc.480733$Po1.435918@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
> I have seen some 30" Widescreen HD Tube TVs with DVI inputs for around
> $1000.
> Is it possible to use these as computer monitors?

My 32" Zenith C32V37 HDTV is connected to my (older) computer's ATI Radeon
9100 Pro video card via DVI cable. I was unable to get any sort of picture
on the HDTV at all until I installed the Powerstrip program, which supports
fine-tuning not only of screen resolution but also scan rates, etc. The
best I finally got was an 1816x520 resolution in which everything is
stretched *vertically* (because the HDTV really expects 1080i lines, but the
card is sending 540p lines). In order to make text readable, I used
especially w-i-d-e fonts for all font settings, both those of Windows XP and
those within Internet Explorer.
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