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HD with a bfg 7950 gt oc on a 24" dell monitor

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January 9, 2007 8:16:16 PM

I have a bfg 7950 gt oc, and it is supposed to support HD. I also have a 24" Dell ultrasharp LCD that is said to support 1080i.

I am trying to watch an HD video trailer in 720p off apple's site, but the picture does not look High Def. I also have a high def TV and i know what a dramatic difference there is between normal video and HD video.

How would I be able to watch HD content on my monitor?

Thanks for any help.

More about : bfg 7950 dell monitor

January 9, 2007 10:51:10 PM

first off, pretty much any computer monitor and video card can support "hd". It probably doesn't look "hd" because your sitting right next to it as apposed to sitting 10 feet away on your couch.
January 10, 2007 4:09:59 AM

720p is a relatively low resolution for monitors of today to display.
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January 10, 2007 10:01:34 AM

IIRC a Dell 24" is 1080p - it actually exceeds the requirements slightly.
January 10, 2007 11:15:44 AM

From what I read the 24" Dell can only handle 1020i, but why isn't the picture even close to the HD picture my TV displays....and it has nothing to do with the proximity to the tv or monitor, as I've checked being the same distance away from them.
January 10, 2007 1:54:32 PM

As stated above 720p is relatively low compared to what a modern monitor is capable of displaying. The video also "may" not be originally true 720p but could be an upconverted image from a lower resolution. On current monitors able to display very high resolutions it may look relatively poor at 720p or especially an upconverted signal.

To elaborate, DVD video looks great on my TV, Looks like scat flying through the image on my 1280x1024 resolution monitor however.

Try to make sure you are "matching" your monitor resolution to the resolution of the video itself. That should help matters but at 24" your monitor is probably running at 1080p resolution or greater while displaying an image significantly lower in 720p(don't forget possible degredation if its upconverted to 720p). Now the 1080p display will surely show the "flaws" easier in a 720p image compared to lowering the monitor resolution to the video feed. Sorry to get so long. Try matching resolutions up, sit back from the monitor a little and see if that helps. It should.
January 10, 2007 2:22:35 PM

Hello, I have that Dell 24" monitor myself for about a year now.

Try downloading Windows Media HD samples off the Microsoft web site. I did and it's BREATHTAKING amazing. I don't have a HD TV in my house except for my Dell. I can't begin to describe how impressed I was on first seeing the HD content vs playing a regular DVD for example.

I'm wondering if the Apple HD just isn't displaying right for one reason or another??? Drivers, codecs etc? Try the WMV HD and see how that looks.
January 10, 2007 4:13:59 PM

Ok, so I downloaded some Windows Media HD samples at 1080p. what should my resolution be set to for optimal viewing? There isn't one for 108 width, there is however 1920 x 1080 is that what I'm supposed to set it to?
January 10, 2007 4:25:51 PM

Quote:
Hello, I have that Dell 24" monitor myself for about a year now.

Try downloading Windows Media HD samples off the Microsoft web site. I did and it's BREATHTAKING amazing. I don't have a HD TV in my house except for my Dell. I can't begin to describe how impressed I was on first seeing the HD content vs playing a regular DVD for example.

I'm wondering if the Apple HD just isn't displaying right for one reason or another??? Drivers, codecs etc? Try the WMV HD and see how that looks.


I downloaded a couple of those and they look great. I also read that the resolution to display 1080p natively is 1920 × 1080, however that resolution is not native to the monitor, and the desktop looks crappy and not at all crisp, so I guess one has to switch resolution when watching HD content.

The HD content however, is still not as good as the one displayed on my HDTV which is a CRT.
January 10, 2007 5:02:21 PM

I'm a little fuzzy in this area but could this be a possible HDCP issue? Is the monitor HDCP compliant?

@Talon, nice Faye avatar.
January 10, 2007 5:33:42 PM

The monitor supports HDCP. What is HDCP anyway?
January 10, 2007 6:18:00 PM

Quote:
@Talon, nice Faye avatar


Yeah very nice, I was gonna make spike my avatar but I just settled on this :) 

HDCP = Link
January 10, 2007 6:32:18 PM

Quote:
The monitor supports HDCP. What is HDCP anyway?

A completely unnecessary pain in the ass.
January 10, 2007 7:36:08 PM

Quote:
The monitor supports HDCP. What is HDCP anyway?

A completely unnecessary pain in the ass.

I still don't understand its usage. Non HDCP monitors will not be able to display HD properly? What the hell is the point of this then?

Also why are some monitors marked as HD while others able to still achieve the 1920x1080 resolution are not????
January 10, 2007 8:59:24 PM

You can read about it here.

More or less its a form of protection against piracy. It was developed by Intel to protect digital entertainment content such as HD-DVDs, Blu-Ray discs, etc, from being pirated. If you try to play this content on a non-HDCP compliant piece of hardware it will result in severely degraded playback. I'm not certain on this yet but it could mean that if one element of your hardware (graphics card, sound card, monitor or T.V., etc.) isn't HDCP compliant you will experience this degraded playback.

I really don't think this is the case with your situation. I'm still reading up on the subject trying to get more info about it and I'm pretty sure this applies more to people using Windows Vista than XP users.

Quote:
Non HDCP monitors will not be able to display HD properly? What the hell is the point of this then?

Indeed. Imagine the surprise a few will have when they try to watch that new HD movie with their new HD-DVD player on their older widescreen TV/ LCD/Plasma.

Quote:
Also why are some monitors marked as HD while others able to still achieve the 1920x1080 resolution are not????

Maybe because they're not HDCP compliant. I'm not sure. HDCP isn't about what a piece of hardware is capable of. Loosely, it's about whether or not a piece of hardware can keep HD content "safe" from evil crackers and pirates (arrrh!) when it travels to or through it.

BTW, in order to make a piece of hardware HDCP compliant the manufacturer must buy a license from the Digital Content Protection, LLC which is a company parented by Intel. The fees, while not phenomenal, will still make Intel a little bit of money in this deal. Of course the hardware manufacturer will not "absorb" these costs. They'll pass them on to the consumer.

I understand the need for something like this. What I don't like is footing the bill for it when there's no way to tell it's going to work. If it does, do you think the poor Hollywood production companies are really going to lower the price of an HD-DVD because they're not getting hit so hard anymore with piracy? What about the poor Record industry and SACDs? Will those prices drop because of less piracy?
January 10, 2007 9:03:42 PM

Quote:
You can read about it here.

More or less its a form of protection against piracy. It was developed by Intel to protect digital entertainment content such as HD-DVDs, Blu-Ray discs, etc, from being pirated. If you try to play this content on a non-HDCP compliant piece of hardware it will result in severely degraded playback. I'm not certain on this yet but it could mean that if one element of your hardware (graphics card, sound card, monitor or T.V., etc.) isn't HDCP compliant you will experience this degraded playback.

I really don't think this is the case with your situation. I'm still reading up on the subject trying to get more info about it and I'm pretty sure this applies more to people using Windows Vista than XP users.

Non HDCP monitors will not be able to display HD properly? What the hell is the point of this then?

Indeed. Imagine the surprise a few will have when they try to watch that new HD movie with their new HD-DVD player on their older widescreen TV/ LCD/Plasma.

Quote:
Also why are some monitors marked as HD while others able to still achieve the 1920x1080 resolution are not????

Maybe because they're not HDCP compliant. I'm not sure. HDCP isn't about what a piece of hardware is capable of. Loosely, it's about whether or not a piece of hardware can keep HD content "safe" from evil crackers and pirates (arrrh!) when it travels to or through it.

BTW, in order to make a piece of hardware HDCP compliant the manufacturer must buy a license from the Digital Content Protection, LLC which is a company parented by Intel. The fees, while not phenomenal, will still make Intel a little bit of money in this deal. Of course the hardware manufacturer will not "absorb" these costs. They'll pass them on to the consumer.

I understand the need for something like this. What I don't like is footing the bill for it when there's no way to tell it's going to work. If it does, do you think the poor Hollywood production companies are really going to lower the price of an HD-DVD because they're not getting hit so hard anymore with piracy? What about the poor Record industry and SACDs? Will those prices drop because of less piracy?

But how is HDCP to stop piracy? If I have ALL of my devices HDCP compliant, what's stopping me from ripping an HD DVD or a blueray disc, and burning a copy? I will be able to do that and watch the video in HD. One without HDCP compliant hardware will not be able to watch that ripped disc in HD glory, but neither will he/she be able to watch a bought HD DVD/blueray because to begin with one or more of their hardware pieces are not HDCP complaint.

Am I missing something here, or does this completely not make any sense?
January 10, 2007 9:20:56 PM

Ahh, you see. Now I think you're beginning to understand it. :wink:

Seriously. Like I said, I'm still reading up on it so I'm sure there is more to it than just that. Here's a small article regarding Vista and DRM that covers a little bit about un-authorized copying of HD-DVD, etc. Read all of it, bu pay attention to pages 2 and 3. I cannot remember, but I think the HD-DVD encryption was only just recently cracked and I don't think it's been confirmed yet.
January 10, 2007 9:21:32 PM

it uses keys, the monitor and Gcard link with eachother and only allow communication between them and nothing else, and they wont do it if theres something in-between

i dont know how it works, but its the same principle as "on demand" TV...you pay £1 for a film but you have to plug your set-top-box into the TV and disconnect the video player because somehow it can detect it and it makes the picture all scrambled.
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