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wizard vs. sorcerer

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Anonymous
May 2, 2004 4:59:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

i'm sure this is something that is often talked about, but i'm wondering
what a lot of people think of it...the draw of a sorcerer is obvious,
with not having to memorize spells and having more to cast...is it a big
deal that they can only learn a few spells at a time? how are spells
learned, on level up only?

i'm still trying to figure out if *any* type of magic user is a good
idea while playing NWN alone...

More about : wizard sorcerer

Anonymous
May 2, 2004 5:17:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"John Salerno" <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:40948026$0$3025$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
> i'm sure this is something that is often talked about, but i'm wondering
> what a lot of people think of it...the draw of a sorcerer is obvious,
> with not having to memorize spells and having more to cast...is it a big
> deal that they can only learn a few spells at a time? how are spells
> learned, on level up only?
>
> i'm still trying to figure out if *any* type of magic user is a good
> idea while playing NWN alone...

Cleric and Druids are good as are anyothers
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 6:39:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Insane Ranter wrote:


> Cleric and Druids are good as are anyothers

I could be making it more of a problem than it is. I know for Morrowind,
for example, playing a spellcaster wasn't a problem at all. The only
thing that has me worried about D&D rules is the having to rest and
memorize spells, and not being able to cast a lot at first.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 7:26:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

John Salerno <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> looked up from reading the
entrails of the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs
say:

>i'm sure this is something that is often talked about, but i'm wondering
>what a lot of people think of it...the draw of a sorcerer is obvious,
>with not having to memorize spells and having more to cast...is it a big
>deal that they can only learn a few spells at a time? how are spells
>learned, on level up only?

Exactly.
It's a trade off of sheer number of known spells for more flexibility in
casting.

A Wizard with 3 level 1 spell slots chooses which 3 spells he will
memorize of however many spells he knows, every time he rests.
A Sorcerer will know fewer spells (and can only change which ones he
knows at level up) but can choose at casting time which spells he wants
to cast.

So for instance with level 2 spells, the Wizard has to choose at rest
time if he wants to memorize a couple identify spells in case of loot,
or memorize melf's acid arrow for fighting with.
The Sorcerer uses whichever he wants at the time.

The big difference is, when they both first get level 2 spells, the
wizard gets a bunch, but he can only memorize one at a time.
The Sorcerer only gets one.

The Wizard with 3 memorized fireballs is out of luck when he runs into a
fire immune critter.
The sorcerer just casts lightning instead, since he just has a number of
spell slots per level, not pre memorized spells.

I prefer Sorcerers myself, mostly because the whole Wizard memorization
thing makes no sense.

>i'm still trying to figure out if *any* type of magic user is a good
>idea while playing NWN alone...

Do you mean completely alone as in no henchmen, or just alone as in no
other players?

I went through all the original campaign with a Sorcerer.
I took a Pixie familiar which dealt with all the traps and locks, and
Delenn Red Tiger - the half-orc barbarin to beat on things and generally
act as a meat shield.

There were a couple of nasty fights, but all in all the Sorcerer was up
to everything he ran into - including killing all the dragons.

Xocyll
--
I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
May 2, 2004 11:39:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

John Salerno <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<40948026$0$3025$61fed72c@news.rcn.com>...
> i'm sure this is something that is often talked about, but i'm wondering
> what a lot of people think of it...the draw of a sorcerer is obvious,
> with not having to memorize spells and having more to cast...is it a big
> deal that they can only learn a few spells at a time? how are spells
> learned, on level up only?
>
Sorcerers and bards have a short list of spells that they improve only
on leveling up, while wizards get to improve their list via found or
purchased spell scrolls. Clerics, druids, rangers and paladins get
access to their entire spell list for their level at all times. Thus,
sorcerers and bards are in a way the -least- flexible casters.

On the other hand, they are also the -most- flexible, in that they can
pick any spells on their lists, and cast one spell 4 times in a row or
4 different spells or any other combination, up to their limit of
spells cast per rest period. Wizards and the various divine casters
have to pick exactly which combination of spells they will have
available for the rest period, and are stuck with that.

Clerics have a special exception, in that they can ditch any
memorized spell and substitute that spell level's healing spell...
which is good because in many situations 90% of what you'll cast are
heals, this way you can memorize flexibility while being prepared for
the healer grind .

At any rate, thats just background that you already more or less knew.
Answer to your question is... it depends. NWN solo play is an odd
offshoot of regular D&D; while the "rest" mechanism means one thing in
a tabletop or even a group computer game, it can mean quite another in
solo play. If you can "rest" at any time, then your spell list is a
concern only over the run of one battle. And if you save and reload
when things turn out poorly, you can change your loadout to fit the
battle you are about to fight... sometimes I think of failed battles
when I'm playing this way as premonitions, or as resulting from the
divination spells that have been left out of NWN.

This means a wizard or divine caster isn't really less flexible than a
sorcerer; since you can memorize those 4 magic missiles for fight A,
and 4 sleeps for fight B, and so on. It also means you don't have to
memorize "non emergency" spells while wandering around; if you need
Identify at some point, you wait till you can rest next, memorize it
then, cast it, then rest again and memorize something useful in that
slot.

BUT many modules use more restrictive rest rules, which limit this
sort of behavior; the module I'm currently playing, Birthright,
requires 3 "game hours" to pass between rests (about 15 minutes of
real time, more or less), and in many areas has a high chance of
wandering monsters interrupting any attempt to rest. This
dramatically reduces the ability to flexibly memorize a tuned list of
spells for a situation... in fact I'm finding it so difficult in some
places that running a pure caster of any sort would seem impossible,
as I'd be out of spells and wandering around as a very weak fighter
for hours at a time. My current character is a monk/druid, and just
did Orchold where I think I was able to rest twice in over 3 hours of
real time play.


> i'm still trying to figure out if *any* type of magic user is a good
> idea while playing NWN alone...

There are several definitions of "alone" here; I assume you mean
"without other player characters", but you -might- mean with no
henchman and no familiar, summoned monsters, animal companions, animal
empathy helpers, or dominated monsters.

The "Without Other Player Characters" mode is the only way I've played
the game thus far, due to my wacky unpredictable play times and
durations, hooking up with other people just hasn't been practical.
I've happily played just about every class, and quite a few multiclass
combinations; casters are certainly different than melee types, but I
wouldn't say they are harder, except where rest is very hard to come
by. Melee types benefit from rest too, but can compensate by
purchasing large stores of healing potions and kits... to do the same
a wizard would have to invest in lots of scrolls or magic wands, and
thats a great deal more expensive.

The other meaning of "alone" would be another story; most casters rely
on having someone or something to engage the bad guys in combat while
they do their work at a distance; the game is filled with
possibilities; summon something, use your familiar, hire a henchman,
charm something (admittedly this last can be very temporary and if
charm breaks early, result in even more things beating on you at one
time...) Casters, and particularly sorcerers and wizards, tend to make
very poor melee characters, with low BAB and poor armor choices (its
-possible- to wear full plate if you take the right Feat, but you
won't be casting much while wearing it)

If you rely heavily on familiars and summoned creatures, you'll
discover the principle weakness of the caster classes; the level of
these creatures is based on the number of levels you have in that
class, not your combined level. This means multiclassing weakens your
"cover" abilities; if you are in a module where reliable and powerful
henchmen are available this isn't such a concern, but a 4 cleric/4
sorcerer will have summoned creature II and a level 4 familiar trying
to face off against opponents where an 8 sorcerer will have summoned
creature IV and a level 8 familiar... the split class guy has helpers
that serve as little better than a speed bumps on the monster's way to
him, while the straight sorcerer has ones that can handle most battles
without any help at all, allowing him to practice his Quarrelling or
play Mah Jong while waiting for some bodies to loot.

Oh, and something else most casters find useful, particularly at low
levels; a ranged weapon; usually a crossbow, but perhaps a sling or
(for elves) longbow... here's something that will let you do damage
without exposing yourself to your enemy's swords, and without using up
those few spells per rest you have, for the cost of 1 gold for 99
shots. At higher levels you may find you have so much casting to do,
and that the arrows are doing so little, that you discard this tool,
but at very low levels where you may only have 5 or 6 spells to your
name, it can be a huge advantage.

Lance
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 5:35:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Xocyll wrote:

>>i'm still trying to figure out if *any* type of magic user is a good
>>idea while playing NWN alone...
>
>
> Do you mean completely alone as in no henchmen, or just alone as in no
> other players?

I just mean playing without other PCs. I suppose I'll need a henchman
for fighting or thieving skills.

Did you find that you had to rest a lot with a sorcerer?
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 5:42:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Lance wrote:


> Sorcerers and bards have a short list of spells that they improve only
> on leveling up, while wizards get to improve their list via found or
> purchased spell scrolls. Clerics, druids, rangers and paladins get
> access to their entire spell list for their level at all times. Thus,
> sorcerers and bards are in a way the -least- flexible casters.

So a sorcerer can choose any spells from a given level when he levels
up? I know he may only be able to know three or four per level, but he
can choose any of them?

It's very tempting to play a wizard since you can learn every spell, but
sometimes I find myself using the same ones over and over anyway, so I
would if I shouldn't try a sorcerer. It's just that I always play a
wizard, so I'm stuck in that mindset.

Also, by "alone" I meant no other PCs. A henchman and definitely a
familiar will be there with me. Are familiars good at fighting? I'm
thinking of my familiar in BG2, the fairy dragon, and while I haven't
used him in a battle, he doesn't seem very strong. Maybe I'm wrong about
that.
May 2, 2004 10:32:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

John Salerno <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<409532f5$0$3060$61fed72c@news.rcn.com>...
> Lance wrote:
>
>
> > Sorcerers and bards have a short list of spells that they improve only
> > on leveling up, while wizards get to improve their list via found or
> > purchased spell scrolls. Clerics, druids, rangers and paladins get
> > access to their entire spell list for their level at all times. Thus,
> > sorcerers and bards are in a way the -least- flexible casters.
>
> So a sorcerer can choose any spells from a given level when he levels
> up? I know he may only be able to know three or four per level, but he
> can choose any of them?
>
Yep, the number he can know is based on his level and charisma, and he
has access to change the list only when leveling in that class... but
more than just picking new ones, he can actually UNLEARN some and
substitute others. This last is very important given your limited
list size, if for example you rely on Summon Creature I... when you
hit 4th level and finally get 2nd level spells, you will likely want
to ditch SCI in favor of some more useful level 1 spell, since that
weak little critter will be replaced with a Summon Creature II spell.

If you are multiclassing, you'll likely have to ditch the whole line
of SC spells since you'll be level 10 (5/5) and still summoning that
SC II critter who now hasn't got the hit points or BAB to be more than
a speed bump.

> It's very tempting to play a wizard since you can learn every spell, but
> sometimes I find myself using the same ones over and over anyway, so I
> would if I shouldn't try a sorcerer. It's just that I always play a
> wizard, so I'm stuck in that mindset.
>
The differences between the two classes aren't really all -that-
large, and the "how they do spells" thing isn't the biggest of them
really, its more a matter of flavor than anything else. Whats most
interesting is that sorcerers get their spells based on charisma,
while wizards get theirs based on intelligence. Skills that benefit
from charisma, like persuade, are much better in the hands of your
average sorcerer, while ones that benefit from intelligence are much
better in the hands of your average wizard. Wizards have another
small benefit on their side though: for -all- classes, there's a bonus
to skill points each level from your intelligence; a wizard's primary
stat also means he's swimming in skills relative to most classes (save
for rogues, who get a pretty heft class bonus)

> Also, by "alone" I meant no other PCs. A henchman and definitely a
> familiar will be there with me. Are familiars good at fighting? I'm
> thinking of my familiar in BG2, the fairy dragon, and while I haven't
> used him in a battle, he doesn't seem very strong. Maybe I'm wrong about
> that.

Depends on the familiar (some types are decent in combat, and some
like the pixie are -not- but give other benefits like lockpicking
skills) and on whether you are single class or multiclassing. If you
are a level 20 character with only 4 levels of wizard, then your
familiar isn't much of a much its true. But a level 14 wizard will
have a pretty decent familiar. Heck, I'm playing a 3 monk/3 druid/1
rogue at the moment and even now my hawk familiar makes a big
difference in most fights; his AC of 20 is high enough to keep him
from getting hit too much by most things I fight, and he's capable of
dealing about 1/3rd as much damage as I do in melee.

The reason henchmen make better "tanks" though is that they level as
your character levels (so none of this "well I'm only a 3 wizard"
thing) and that you can gear them up; familiars and companions and
summoned creatures can only be buffed up via spells, not by handing
them better equipment.

Lance
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 10:40:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

On Sun, 02 May 2004 13:42:10 -0400, John Salerno <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>Lance wrote:
>
>> Sorcerers and bards have a short list of spells that they improve only
>> on leveling up, while wizards get to improve their list via found or
>> purchased spell scrolls. Clerics, druids, rangers and paladins get
>> access to their entire spell list for their level at all times. Thus,
>> sorcerers and bards are in a way the -least- flexible casters.
>
>So a sorcerer can choose any spells from a given level when he levels
>up? I know he may only be able to know three or four per level, but he
>can choose any of them?
>
>It's very tempting to play a wizard since you can learn every spell, but
>sometimes I find myself using the same ones over and over anyway, so I
>would if I shouldn't try a sorcerer. It's just that I always play a
>wizard, so I'm stuck in that mindset.
>
>Also, by "alone" I meant no other PCs. A henchman and definitely a
>familiar will be there with me. Are familiars good at fighting? I'm
>thinking of my familiar in BG2, the fairy dragon, and while I haven't
>used him in a battle, he doesn't seem very strong. Maybe I'm wrong about
>that.

Wizards generally develop a "normal" spell list, but the versatility inherent in
knowing every spell and being able to use any spell after a short memorization
is simply too good to pass up in my mind.

Familiars are OK at fighting. Some are better than others.
Imps and Mephits do OK but not spectacularly.
The panther does pretty good but isn't much of a tank; it does better in a Sneak
Attack role.
My favorite is the hell hound, especially if you buff him up a bit.

eudas
Inside of every silver lining, there's a big, dark cloud.
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 10:54:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Xocyll wrote:

> It was never annoying though, especially at the higher levels when you
> can fire off a lot of spells before you run out.

Will a wizard reach a high enough level (around 9 or 10, I guess) early
enough in the game to have a lot of spells to cast?
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 11:22:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Insane Ranter wrote:

> Lets see, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Wizard, Sorercer, do we want to include
> Ranger and Paladin as well?

I'm sure he's talking about pure spellcasters (wizards and sorcerers),
but then again I've noticed that you often misinterpret, whether
intentionally or not, what people say.
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 2:10:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"John Salerno" <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4094979c$0$3052$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
> Insane Ranter wrote:
>
>
> > Cleric and Druids are good as are anyothers
>
> I could be making it more of a problem than it is. I know for Morrowind,
> for example, playing a spellcaster wasn't a problem at all. The only
> thing that has me worried about D&D rules is the having to rest and
> memorize spells, and not being able to cast a lot at first.

I don't know about that ... I found I liked some battle-ability in that type
of game (also Gothic II). In the heat of battle you can run out of mana in
those types of games, and then start popping potions (or eating stuff). In
NWN you can always use Wands or Rods, and should have a good Staff at your
disposal as well.

NWN I almost never 'hit' anyone ... >99% spells.

Mike
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 2:23:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"John Salerno" <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:409582d0$0$3024$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
> Insane Ranter wrote:
>
> > Lets see, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Wizard, Sorercer, do we want to include
> > Ranger and Paladin as well?
>
> I'm sure he's talking about pure spellcasters (wizards and sorcerers),
> but then again I've noticed that you often misinterpret, whether
> intentionally or not, what people say.

Then he should say all not most spellcasters then. If you aren't including
druids and clerics.
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 7:09:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"Insane Ranter" <whoo@hooo.me> looked up from reading the entrails of
the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:

>
>"John Salerno" <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:409582d0$0$3024$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
>> Insane Ranter wrote:
>>
>> > Lets see, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Wizard, Sorercer, do we want to include
>> > Ranger and Paladin as well?
>>
>> I'm sure he's talking about pure spellcasters (wizards and sorcerers),
>> but then again I've noticed that you often misinterpret, whether
>> intentionally or not, what people say.
>
>Then he should say all not most spellcasters then. If you aren't including
>druids and clerics.

Druids and Clerics don't "cast" spells, they channel the power of their
deity. Pray for effect, get effect granted by deity unless they've been
bad, since they aren't the one "casting" the spell, they don't have the
same armor restrictions actual casters do.

Notice that Wizards and Sorcerers do not lose spells when their
alignment changes, Druids, Clerics, Paladins do, because their deity
isn't picking up when they call.

Xocyll
--
I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 7:40:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"Xocyll" <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote in message
news:n26d90djiu3tsl7q9tirnkb8ublsrbmr6c@4ax.com...
> "Insane Ranter" <whoo@hooo.me> looked up from reading the entrails of
> the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:
>
> >
> >"John Salerno" <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >news:409582d0$0$3024$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
> >> Insane Ranter wrote:
> >>
> >> > Lets see, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Wizard, Sorercer, do we want to
include
> >> > Ranger and Paladin as well?
> >>
> >> I'm sure he's talking about pure spellcasters (wizards and sorcerers),
> >> but then again I've noticed that you often misinterpret, whether
> >> intentionally or not, what people say.
> >
> >Then he should say all not most spellcasters then. If you aren't
including
> >druids and clerics.
>
> Druids and Clerics don't "cast" spells, they channel the power of their
> deity. Pray for effect, get effect granted by deity unless they've been
> bad, since they aren't the one "casting" the spell, they don't have the
> same armor restrictions actual casters do.
>
> Notice that Wizards and Sorcerers do not lose spells when their
> alignment changes, Druids, Clerics, Paladins do, because their deity
> isn't picking up when they call.
>

Alrighty whatever you say chief
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 8:37:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

John Salerno <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> looked up from reading the
entrails of the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs
say:

>Xocyll wrote:
>
>> It was never annoying though, especially at the higher levels when you
>> can fire off a lot of spells before you run out.
>
>Will a wizard reach a high enough level (around 9 or 10, I guess) early
>enough in the game to have a lot of spells to cast?

It's been a while since I played, but you'd get a fair number of spells
by then.

Xocyll
--
I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 11:58:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Insane Ranter wrote:
>>Druids and Clerics don't "cast" spells, they channel the power of their
>>deity. Pray for effect, get effect granted by deity unless they've been
>>bad, since they aren't the one "casting" the spell, they don't have the
>>same armor restrictions actual casters do.
>>
>>Notice that Wizards and Sorcerers do not lose spells when their
>>alignment changes, Druids, Clerics, Paladins do, because their deity
>>isn't picking up when they call.
>
>
> Alrighty whatever you say chief

A classic goose-gander example that I think Xocyll set up on purpose.
Anonymous
May 4, 2004 12:09:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Xocyll wrote:
> "Insane Ranter" <whoo@hooo.me> looked up from reading the entrails of
> the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:
>
>
>>"John Salerno" <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>news:409582d0$0$3024$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
>>
>>>Insane Ranter wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Lets see, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Wizard, Sorercer, do we want to include
>>>>Ranger and Paladin as well?
>>>
>>>I'm sure he's talking about pure spellcasters (wizards and sorcerers),
>>>but then again I've noticed that you often misinterpret, whether
>>>intentionally or not, what people say.
>>
>>Then he should say all not most spellcasters then. If you aren't including
>>druids and clerics.
>
>
> Druids and Clerics don't "cast" spells, they channel the power of their
> deity. Pray for effect, get effect granted by deity unless they've been
> bad, since they aren't the one "casting" the spell, they don't have the
> same armor restrictions actual casters do.
>
> Notice that Wizards and Sorcerers do not lose spells when their
> alignment changes, Druids, Clerics, Paladins do, because their deity
> isn't picking up when they call.

And rangers, who are divine spellcasters, don't.

"Divine spellcasters aren't actually spellcasters" is not a good idea;
it adds another level of unnecessary complexity to terminology which
already confuses a lot of people.
Anonymous
May 4, 2004 10:45:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"Lance" <emporer@dejazzd.com> wrote in message
news:8854c397.0405021732.23a6eef5@posting.google.com...
> John Salerno <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:<409532f5$0$3060$61fed72c@news.rcn.com>...
> > Lance wrote:
> >
> >
> > > Sorcerers and bards have a short list of spells that they improve only
> > > on leveling up, while wizards get to improve their list via found or
> > > purchased spell scrolls. Clerics, druids, rangers and paladins get
> > > access to their entire spell list for their level at all times. Thus,
> > > sorcerers and bards are in a way the -least- flexible casters.
> >
> > So a sorcerer can choose any spells from a given level when he levels
> > up? I know he may only be able to know three or four per level, but he
> > can choose any of them?

<snip>

I've played both wizards and sorcerors in different modules. They can both
work well. If I remember right the sorcerors have a shorter spell list than
wizards, ie there are some spells wizards can do that sorcerors just can't
get. Sorceror spells being focussed more around the direct damage-causing
ones.

In actual fact wizards and sorcerors are among the most powerful characters
in the game because they can run a 'Party' of four; PC, Henchman, Familiar
and Summoned Creature. The whole party goes up in level with the PC,
assuming you make sure to get the appropriate summoning spell for each spell
level. The summoned creature acts as muscle. My personal preference is for
the imp as familiar; it gives the important rogue skills on tap all the time
(Pick lock, detect trap, disarm trap) and it does surprisingly well in
melee, as it is hard to hit, esp once it starts casting Imp Invis. That
means you can afford to pick whichever henchman you please, a cleric goes
down well as a combination of muscle and healing, but you will be doing well
enough that you can afford to choose on the basis of personality
interactions. Buy a crossbow, or later a bow, that will be your contribution
to many fights where there is no need to waste precious spells. At lower
levels in the OC the rod you get before leaving the academy which casts the
ice damage cantrip as often as you like will also work well for you.

It may just be me but I think the fighter classes are boring in comparison.


Hugh
Anonymous
May 4, 2004 10:45:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Hugh Conkey wrote:

> level. The summoned creature acts as muscle. My personal preference is for
> the imp as familiar; it gives the important rogue skills on tap all the time
> (Pick lock, detect trap, disarm trap)

Can you change your familiar at will?
May 4, 2004 10:45:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"John Salerno" <johnjsalNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4097e304$0$3054$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
> Hugh Conkey wrote:
>
> > level. The summoned creature acts as muscle. My personal preference is
for
> > the imp as familiar; it gives the important rogue skills on tap all the
time
> > (Pick lock, detect trap, disarm trap)
>
> Can you change your familiar at will?

Every time you level your spellcasting class you can choose which familiar
you want.
Anonymous
May 5, 2004 12:02:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

Hugh Conkey wrote:
> My personal preference is for
> the imp as familiar; it gives the important rogue skills on tap all the time
> (Pick lock, detect trap, disarm trap) and it does surprisingly well in
> melee, as it is hard to hit, esp once it starts casting Imp Invis.


I think you mean pixie, not imp.
--
Barry Scott Will
Pyric RPG Publications
http://www.pyric.com/

If you insist on emailing me, remove all the **JUNK** first
Anonymous
May 8, 2004 1:52:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.neverwinter-nights (More info?)

"Barry Scott Will" <nwn**JUNK**@cavecreations.net> wrote in message
news:SFSlc.32461$kh4.1571770@attbi_s52...
> Hugh Conkey wrote:
> > My personal preference is for
> > the imp as familiar; it gives the important rogue skills on tap all the
time
> > (Pick lock, detect trap, disarm trap) and it does surprisingly well in
> > melee, as it is hard to hit, esp once it starts casting Imp Invis.
>
>
> I think you mean pixie, not imp.
> --

You're right of course. Just spotted it myself as I re-read the post. Sorry
for being misleading

Hugh
!