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Dual Core Duo question

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January 10, 2007 2:09:08 PM

I can get a Pentium D at 3.0 ghz for about $100...
I can get a Pentium Dual Core Duo at 1.8ghz for about $190...

Is it safe to say that the Dual Core Duo's processing speed is doubled since it is "Dual Core Duo" therefore making it seem like its going at the speed of 3.6ghz (1.8ghz x 2 = 3.6ghz)? If not, then why is it faster? I understand that the bus speed is way higher, but, I don't know... I just don't get it. Anyone mind explaining to me why the latter is so much better?

Thanks!

More about : dual core duo question

January 10, 2007 2:45:46 PM

Quote:
I can get a Pentium D at 3.0 ghz for about $100...
I can get a Pentium Dual Core Duo at 1.8ghz for about $190...

Is it safe to say that the Dual Core Duo's processing speed is doubled since it is "Dual Core Duo" therefore making it seem like its going at the speed of 3.6ghz (1.8ghz x 2 = 3.6ghz)? If not, then why is it faster? I understand that the bus speed is way higher, but, I don't know... I just don't get it. Anyone mind explaining to me why the latter is so much better?

Thanks!


Wait...wait...what?

A Pentium D is a dual-core processor, and a desktop chip. The Core Duo is also a dual-core processor, but typically used in notebooks or low-power desktops. Both are now outdated (moreso the Pentium D). The Core Duo is better because it would generate the same or better performance than most Pentium Ds with significantly less energy use and heat generation.

Also, when you have a dual core, simply doubling the clock speed does not show the real performance. It's complicated.
January 10, 2007 2:49:11 PM

The first thing you need to understand is the product names.

Pentium D was Intel's Dual-Core Pentium processors, which were the flagship product up until a few months ago.

They were replaced by Core Duo (not Dual Core Duo :wink: ), a processor and architecture change which is vastly superior to the older system (called NetBurst - the system which the Pentium processors ran on).

As for dual-core CPUs, they aren't the sum of their parts unless you do certain things. Say you have a task that will use 75% of your CPU - a game, for example. You can offload that task to one core of the CPU leaving the other one to run all your other processes, like the ones that keep Windows running.

That's a basic outline of what Dual-core means. It doesn't mean that 2x 1.8ghz = 3.6ghz.

Another thing you need to know is that clockspeed isn't everything. All of the Core 2 Duo & Quad processors are faster than all of the Pentium processors. This is due to the superior workings of the system rather than just the FSB being higher, clock speeds etc...
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January 10, 2007 3:10:18 PM

Quote:
I can get a Pentium Dual Core Duo at 1.8ghz for about $190...


No such thing.

These are all seperate lines of processors:

Pentium 4
Pentium D
Core Duo
Core 2 Duo
January 10, 2007 3:41:10 PM

Yeah, I should've memorized the tongue twisting names Intel came up with before posting. I'm sorry about that.. :wink: but yeah, so the Core 2 Duo pretty much are superior in everyway, but the lower clockspeed confuses me because I'm used to reading "Required Specs" on software and seeing the clockspeeds.

What are they going to do now since the Core 2 Duo clockspeed changes the usual "Required Spec" format?
January 10, 2007 3:47:40 PM

Not yet, but when they do they'll probably list the lowest recommended processor for both AMD and Intel-based systems. For example, the box might read: "AMD X2 4800+ or Intel E6400 or greater." Something like that, it won't get any more confusing once that happens. If the recommended specs are talking Ghz in terms of the Pentium 4 or Pentium D, just ignore it. Just about any X2 or C2D will be able to run it, but of course do your research first if you're going to build a system to run specific programs.
January 10, 2007 3:47:48 PM

Quote:
Yeah, I should've memorized the tongue twisting names Intel came up with before posting. I'm sorry about that.. :wink: but yeah, so the Core 2 Duo pretty much are superior in everyway, but the lower clockspeed confuses me because I'm used to reading "Required Specs" on software and seeing the clockspeeds.

What are they going to do now since the Core 2 Duo clockspeed changes the usual "Required Spec" format?


You are correct. Core 2 Duo is Intel's flagship mainstream processor. Core 2 Duos of any kind should meet virtually any processor requirement out there.

Core Duo is yesterday's news.
Pentium 4 isn't allowed to be discussed on these forums anymore (just kidding)
Pentium D's are for suckers who by Dells.

Core 2 Duo is the way to go if you're buying an Intel processor.
January 10, 2007 3:49:53 PM

Quote:
Yeah, I should've memorized the tongue twisting names Intel came up with before posting. I'm sorry about that.. :wink: but yeah, so the Core 2 Duo pretty much are superior in everyway, but the lower clockspeed confuses me because I'm used to reading "Required Specs" on software and seeing the clockspeeds.

What are they going to do now since the Core 2 Duo clockspeed changes the usual "Required Spec" format?


You are correct. Core 2 Duo is Intel's flagship mainstream processor. Core 2 Duos of any kind should meet virtually any processor requirement out there.

Core Duo is yesterday's news.
Pentium 4 isn't allowed to be discussed on these forums anymore (just kidding)
Pentium D's are for suckers who by Dells.

Core 2 Duo is the way to go if you're buying an Intel processor.

I enjoy Pentium 4 and Pentium D discussions if they're just for fun. I keep a P4 machine around to tinker with and fold on, :) 
!