getting your system to run below room temp

How would i get my system running below room temp without using liquid nitrogen or vegetable oil???

my idea...see water/ice cooling thread...

any others??

when i mean system i mean processor and video card not the whole computer. If you have any ideas on cooling the whole system under rooom temp plz share also..

thanks..lewey..
82 answers Last reply
More about getting system room temp
  1. Put it in a freezer.

    After starting a new build and seeing my temps soar to 70C, I started looking at cooling options. SO far, air cooling is working fine for me. Cost about $100 (good case, good CPU cooler, fans).

    Good water cooling costs about $300 or so.

    Now I'm wondering why we just don't spend $170 on a chest freezer (a used one would be $50) and stick the whole case in there. Should be able to get close to freezing at the CPU if the ambient is 0F.

    Just a thought. A lot cheaper and easier than some of these other idears.

    Tom
  2. if its winter time open the window.
  3. A mini fridge wouldnt work. There made to cool something down and keep it at that temp, like a bottle of water. A pc is like a heater, its a constant source of heat, the cooling unit inside the fridge isnt made to continuously cool down a hot item, its made to cool it then keep it cool. As long as the pc isnt on i guess it would work, but not if its on. The only way you could use a fridge is if you stripped out the stock vapor phase change system and replaced it with a custom built one with considerably more power.
  4. Quote:
    A mini fridge wouldnt work. There made to cool something down and keep it at that temp, like a bottle of water. A pc is like a heater, its a constant source of heat, the cooling unit inside the fridge isnt made to continuously cool down a hot item, its made to cool it then keep it cool. As long as the pc isnt on i guess it would work, but not if its on. The only way you could use a fridge is if you stripped out the stock vapor phase change system and replaced it with a custom built one with considerably more power.


    The man speaks the truth. Once the world understands how refrigerators work, that idea will never surface :P

    Phase change, cascade and TEC are all possible to drop under room temp. Why you want to deal with sub ambient temps? Not sure. If you are going for OC records, just use dry ice or LN2.

    One funny effect I get with my new case is lower CPU temps than case temps. Right now my CPU is idling at 13C and my case temp is at 17C :P
  5. Quote:

    Phase change, cascade and TEC are all possible to drop under room temp. Why you want to deal with sub ambient temps? Not sure. If you are going for OC records, just use dry ice or LN2.


    Liquid Helium would be better then LN2. I think a cooler that used some kind of superfluid would be awesome, but it would take alot to keep it cold enough.
  6. Liquid helium requires minimum melting pressures of 25 atm 29 atm at 0.3 K. Suffice to say, that once its exposed to regular atmosphere is would rappidly boil. I'm not an expert with liquid helium but it seems that it would be extremely unpractical to use it. Since liquid nitrogen can even cool a prescott! and still be cooling it to well and far below zero.

    One thing i can think of is that the colder circuits get the better they conduct electricity. If you could use liquid helium maybe it would cause all the transistors to have zero electro resistance since they would act like superconductors. So there would be no heat created by resistance of conducting. Seems like the real limitation is the processor itself, i remember watching toms overclock a prescott to over 5 ghz with liquid nitrogen, they got even higher than that but i think it crashed soon after.

    here's some info on liquid helium, please correct me if i was not accurate.

    liquid helium
    more info
  7. That liquid helium rocks
  8. IBM got a chip up to 500ghz using liquid helium, thats good enough for me.

    http://www.gatech.edu/news-room/release.php?id=1019
  9. I read about cooling with liquid metal about a year ago. (Just like a watercooling system, but with a metal that's liquid at room temperatures). I suppose it's still in the R&D stage. Let me try to dig up some info on that.
  10. Found this:

    Sapphire Radeon X850 XT PE Blizzard, with a stock cooler developed by a company called "NanoCoolers". (google them).
    Chip cooled to 12 degrees centigrade. (below ambient isn't it?)

    The metal is supposedly gallium, but it was not confirmed by Sapphire at that time. Disclosed info: boiling point at 2000 C, thermal conductivity 65 times higher than that of water.

    blowing air still required. Anyways. Check out this article. No need to know Russian, the diagrams are in English.

    http://www.overclockers.ru/hardnews/18847.shtml


    UPdate: it's a gallium based alloy. The stuff is pumped by electromagnetic forces, not a hydraulic pump.
  11. Thats pretty cool, but ineffective for below zero cooling, gallium melts as about 29°C, mercury would probably be a better choice, it has a melting point of about -38°C.

    I had an idea a while ago, make a thermal paste out of pulverized diamond, diamond conducts heat alot better then something like silver. It would also be alot more dangerous and expensive. Maybe even as a hsf, it conducts heat 5 times better then copper.
  12. Quote:
    if its winter time open the window.


    are you kidding? the american co2 did it this time: january temperature in sweden : 5-10C, rains. Frikkin trees are starting to flower (the less inteligent ones =)
  13. below zero always poses a danger of frost, or moisture build-up, like was said above.
    Mercury is pretty damn expensive and harmful. Surely more expensive than gallium. A week doesn't pass without me reading in the news about another guy who tried to push a kilo or two of red mercury in the black market, for an outrageous sum of money. ))
  14. use liquid nitrogen. no need to worry about condensation
  15. Quote:
    below zero always poses a danger of frost, or moisture build-up, like was said above.
    Mercury is pretty damn expensive and harmful. Surely more expensive than gallium. A week doesn't pass without me reading in the news about another guy who tried to push a kilo or two of red mercury in the black market, for an outrageous sum of money. ))


    Mercury is never red. It is grey with a metallic shine.

    From wikipedia:
    Red mercury is a mythical substance that was claimed to be used in the creation of nuclear bombs. Samples obtained from arrested would-be terrorists invariably consisted of nothing more than various red dyes or powders of little value, which some suspect was being sold as part of a campaign intended to flush out potential terrorist organizations. Although this conclusion appears fairly strong, red mercury remains a topic of some dispute.
  16. Have I been living under a rock, and liquid nitrogen has become an over-the-counter kinda stuff, that is cheap and easy to handle at home?

    I assume that the person who started the topic meant a constantly running system, not standing next to the motherboard and pouring nitrogen on the CPU
  17. Whatever, it's what they call it in the news. In real life it could be s**t brown for all I care.
  18. Really? I thought it was a joke alltogether. What on earth would that do good?
    So that you can cool your coke in the case or what?
  19. besides liquid helium was mentioned here already so i guess liquid nitrogen is in fact much more of a over-the-counter thing in comparison.
  20. Hmm, apparently the Soviet secret services also used the hypothetical red mercury to pick out terrorists and other enemies of the state. I guess the name stuck.
  21. I've yet to see it at a local pharmacy ))
  22. lol. Don't you know in America you can buy plutonium at the gas station? And we carry flux capacitators at walmart (on sale this week too!). Heck, we get liquid helium piped to the house just for cooling our 500ghz IBM proc's, liquid nitrogen is actually harder to obtain just because there just isnt the vast demand for it that liquid helium has. But then again we call things different things here :P


    yes, i'm from canada, but honestly we aren't that different, i swear!
  23. Never tried asking in the pharmacy.
    Getting it is probably easier than mercury though because of mercury's toxicity. Then again nitrogen is not so unharmful because of its temperature..
    Anyways if you have a university around nitrogen isnt that unusual to stumble upon. They use it on some laborations with students and store it in big tanks outside. Unprotected.
  24. Quote:

    yes, i'm from canada, but honestly we aren't that different, i swear!


    i think you and I arent so different indeed

    its fun
  25. Making Ice Cream
    The Process
    Put the ice cream mix into a bowl, pour in some liquid nitrogen, and stir.
    Continue stirring and adding liquid nitrogen until the mixture is thick.
    Why do you need to keep stirring?
    Eat the resulting ice cream.

    A Simple Recipe
    2 cups whipping cream
    2 cups light cream
    4-8 tsp vanilla flavoring
    1 cup sugar

    http://www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperiments/agesubject/lessons/nitrogen.html
    http://www.polsci.wvu.edu/Henry/Icecream/Icecream.html
    http://www.physik.uni-augsburg.de/~ubws/nitrogen.html
  26. Quote:
    I assume that the person who started the topic meant a constantly running system, not standing next to the motherboard and pouring nitrogen on the CPU


    Wouldnt exactly be on the cpu, more in a tube thats mounted on top of the cpu. I guess if you have enough cash you could build or buy a permanite liquid nitrogen cooling system, all you need is a crap load of nitrogen in gas form, an insane cooling unit to turn it into a liquid, a huge holding tank for said liquid, and a system of insulated pipes to transport the liquid from place to place (cooling unit-->holding tank-->pc.) All you would have to do is replace the nitro tanks every now and then. You might even be able to filter the nitro out of the air. I see something like that costing $10,000+ since you would probably have to build a big ass shed or something to keep the system in.
  27. Just set it up in the basement )). But that's for below zero.

    You could also hook up your water cooling system to the cold water tap, to get an infinite supply of cold water to the heatsink )). I can actually afford it coz my water bill is fixed ( only in Russia) :), and together with electricity and heating it comes to about 20 bucks a month. no joking.
  28. Here is couple of advices on how to get hold of some liquid nitrogen:

    http://www.zyra.org.uk/getliqn.htm
  29. Quote:
    Just set it up in the basement )). But that's for below zero.

    You could also hook up your water cooling system to the cold water tap, to get an infinite supply of cold water to the heatsink )). I can actually afford it coz my water bill is fixed ( only in Russia) :), and together with electricity and heating it comes to about 20 bucks a month. no joking.


    I wouldnt rely on those old soviet pipes so much. What if they cut water in the middle of ... something-important-being-done-on-the-computer ?
  30. Quote:
    You could also hook up your water cooling system to the cold water tap, to get an infinite supply of cold water to the heatsink )). I can actually afford it coz my water bill is fixed ( only in Russia) :), and together with electricity and heating it comes to about 20 bucks a month. no joking.


    I had the exact same idea a month ago (although i was going to use a garden hose.), i was going to test it out and use an oc'ed nintendo 64 (My pc isnt going anywhere near a water system like that.). Seemed to go over pretty well here, so i decied to post my idea in the water cooling section of the xtreme systems forum. After about 3 posts it turned into a flame war about wasting water, i tried to explain that i was only going to test it out once or twice to see if my idea was vaild, but that didnt help at all.
  31. those environmental activists....
    even made their way into the extreme systems, heh.

    So, liquid metal does right now seem like the most appropriate option. now, you could track down some of those radeon's and rip them apart for parts.

    Or buy a Zalman Reserator, a truckload of old thermometers (with mercury inside) and you're set with your heat transferring agent. Hurray, no more water with corrosive additives ))
  32. A powerful water system would work as well, you would probably need a couple rads to cool the mercury down to room temp again, maybe even submerge them in iced water. You would also need a REALLY powerful pump to move the metal, maybe even a couple of 'em spread throughout the loop.
  33. Quote:
    Just set it up in the basement )). But that's for below zero.

    You could also hook up your water cooling system to the cold water tap, to get an infinite supply of cold water to the heatsink )). I can actually afford it coz my water bill is fixed ( only in Russia) :), and together with electricity and heating it comes to about 20 bucks a month. no joking.


    I wouldnt rely on those old soviet pipes so much. What if they cut water in the middle of ... something-important-being-done-on-the-computer ?

    You mean like watching highly sensitive porn? :P
  34. oh boy, that was funny.

    http://www.overclockers.ru/lab/15783.shtml
    check out the pics here.

    For those used to electricity powered household heaters - the pictures show a section of a wall mounted radiator. Beats a reserator by far, and the cost is dirt cheap.
    (Yes, most of the houses in Russia, even the newly built ones are still heated by hot water. the so called "central heating". Basically - a big ass water heating station in the area pumps hot water into every building where it runs thru every floor and every radiator on it).
  35. That seems like a pretty good cpu cooling idea, after the water has moved throught the house(s) and it cools off, have it run through the water cooling loop on a pc.
  36. Whats wrong with heating with hot water? Electricity is the most expensive source of power nowadays so it is quite stupid just to burn the watts in the heaters if there are alternatives.
    You dont need to have one big ass heating station, you can have some smaller ones. You can have one in your house if you live in a house. They are fueled with all sorts of things. Oil, gas, wood, coal...
  37. no no no, its just a separate radiator that he bought, and the runs in a loop. Not connected to the house heating in any way.

    If you look closely - you'll see that its made of serially connected sections. 3 in total. The water zigzags thru them (up and down) and thus travels a long way.
  38. Quote:
    That seems like a pretty good cpu cooling idea, after the water has moved throught the house(s) and it cools off, have it run through the water cooling loop on a pc.


    i think the point here is to take the radiator off the wall and use it in water cooled computer system to well.. cool the water .
  39. Yeah, agreed. they install water-heating tanks on the service floors nowadays.
  40. What about an old nuclear reactor out of a sub? Does pretty much the same job, heats water up to drive steam powered engines. If you could adjust the power so it only gets the water really hot instead of boiling it you would be set, although radiation sheilding would be a problem. Eh, its Russia, who cares if they all die of radiation poisoning?

    J/K about the last sentance, Russia is awesome.
  41. thanks bro, made me feel all warm and comfortable inside :P
  42. lol. You sure its not the radiation making you all warm and fuzzy inside?

    Hehe, jokes
  43. I dunno, but I can pee with lights off )). Is it normal that it glows in the dark? ))
  44. Quote:
    lol. You sure its not the radiation making you all warm and fuzzy inside?


    After a few minutes of exposure i figure that you would be feeling pretty warm.
  45. Quote:
    I dunno, but I can pee with lights off )). Is it normal that it glows in the dark? ))


    Yeah, no big deal.
  46. guys!!!!!!!!! i want something practical lololololol


    can you imagine me(a 14 year old kid) going to some place and saying...hi do you have liquid nitrogen???

    ya...

    practical!!!!!

    something practical that i can use it in an everyday system
  47. Quote:
    I dunno, but I can pee with lights off )). Is it normal that it glows in the dark? ))


    lol, Kto v Moskve ne byval, krasoty ne vidal :wink:
  48. Quote:
    can you imagine me(a 14 year old kid) going to some place and saying...hi do you have liquid nitrogen???


    Dude, thats what parents are for! Just tell them its for a school science project or something.

    If you want to run your system below ambient temps everyday the only thing i could think of would be a chilled liquid or vapor phase change system. It'll take a while to setup because you'll have to protect everything from condensation, but after that you should be fine.

    Chilled liquid cooling would probably be safer then phase change, since most systems cant cool lower then like -10°C, phase systems can go down to like -60°C if there powerful enough. You dont want to run a cpu at a temp of like -60°C for extended periods of time, they just arent made for those temps. -10°C is pretty cold too, but alot safer. Remeber, low power is your friend when using for extended periods of time!
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