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Can someone make a basic guide for building my new comp?

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January 11, 2007 2:12:48 AM

I know a fair amount about computers but this is the first time i'm actually building one. The stuff is in my sig. Could someone just give me a basic step by step so that i don't mess up and have to back track?

PS. How do you like my build? :p 
January 11, 2007 3:01:28 AM

/BUMP

I value your oppionions, but i'm still waiting for jack :p 
January 11, 2007 3:54:47 AM

I have another question. My case has the spacers to install the mobo with, and also ha some little washer pads. How exactly do i put the mobo in with those?

Stupid question but meh....
Related resources
January 11, 2007 4:37:07 AM

Damn, i just realized i put the HSF on the wrong direction, so i just unhooked it and turned it around, thats ok right?

And i really need an answer about the spacers, i don't want to fry my mobo. :cry: 
January 11, 2007 5:03:25 AM

Quote:
do you have it all?all the components that is.

you had to ask on a day i chose to sort through 60gb of stufio data :p 


LOL, ya i have everything, except the monitor, but thats ok, since i can just use this monitor.

I also want to add to my spacer question. The case has 6 "dimples" and the mobo has to have 9 screws. Now do the dimples need spacers? or do just the other 3 holes need them? Also, which side of the mobo should i put the washers? the top i assume. 8)
January 11, 2007 5:04:33 AM

Should be okay to put the brass stand offs on the mb plate. Line up the holes and screw them down.

Here is also a guide that can help you out some:

Mounting Hardware

Quote:
Mounting Hardware

If you are buying a new case, it should come with mounting hardware. These pieces normally come with the case, not the motherboard. Make sure you have the appropriate mounting hardware or your system assembly will stall in pretty short order! The exact hardware included varies greatly and depends on what the manufacturer decided to include in the case, but you will generally find some combination of the following (since most cases will use a combination of mounting holes):

* Plastic Standoffs: Also called "spacers", "sliders", and of course the highly technical "thingamajiggies", these are generally made of white plastic and are used for mounting the motherboard to system cases that have large eyelet holes. They have a collapsible point on one end and a round disk on the other. They were originally created to make motherboard installation "easier" since they do not require screws, but in my opinion they are just a pain to deal with because they make lining up the motherboard more difficult during installation.
* Metal Standoffs: Again also called "spacers" and a few other names (some of them unprintable), these are 3/16" hexagonal nuts with a threaded screw on the end. They are usually made of brass, sometimes steel, and they are used for mounting to threaded holes in the system case.
* Screws: These are used to screw the motherboard to the brass standoffs mentioned above.
* Washers: Generally made of plastic or paper, these go under the screws to keep the screw head away from the circuitry on the top surface of the motherboard. These are now sometimes being omitted in new system cases because they are less necessary now than they once were (since motherboards today now tend to keep the circuitry farther away from the screw holes than they once did).


Thought that was good description.
January 11, 2007 5:06:10 AM

No disrespect, but if u gota ask those question maybe u should get someone who knows (a real person, not online) to help you. But good luck
January 11, 2007 5:06:25 AM

Quote:
I have another question. My case has the spacers to install the mobo with, and also ha some little washer pads. How exactly do i put the mobo in with those?

Stupid question but meh....

Are you talking about the litlle red or white washers, or the plastic mobo standoffs? The washers are not for the mobo. Every screwhole on the mobo is uninsulated conductor to ground the mobo to the case.
January 11, 2007 5:09:54 AM

Ya i'm talking about the red paper ones. And the spacers would probably be for the 3 far screws.

I was reading this hardware guide and if you go to the link for spacers, thats about the xtent of my experience with this. :wink:
January 11, 2007 5:14:16 AM

yer i know that, but he got a LOT!! of expensive gear for someone who dosnt know, i was just thinking of that, would u contruct a $10000 Shed alone if u didnt know wot u was doin, i think not
Anonymous
January 11, 2007 5:29:22 AM

Use the paper red washers or plastice ones if you have them. They also help reduce vibration in the mobo to the case from fans etc... and vice versa.

Also you might want to lay your mobo then install the drives, then CPU, HSF then RAM then your PCI, AGP cards, then lift the mobo slightly to run cables under it for better cable management. Then secure the mobo down and plug in the cables .
January 11, 2007 5:35:46 AM

Quote:
Use the paper red washers or plastice ones if you have them. quote]

ehh washers??? who uses those things anymore?? i suggest you throw them out the window.
January 11, 2007 5:51:16 AM

Ok peeps, i got the mobo in without much issue, except for a faulty screw :wink:

Anyway, i seem to be having more trouble installing the I/O panel than the mobo :p  , I can't seem to get those bendy peices in right, what should i do?
January 11, 2007 5:55:39 AM

This is a popular topic. Not only in these forumz but on the Internet in general. FWIW, the links provided in the two Tom's Forumz threads below may give you what you are looking for.

Build your own PC: "click here"

A How to build a PC Guide

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
January 11, 2007 6:10:30 AM

Quote:
Ok peeps, i got the mobo in without much issue, except for a faulty screw :wink:

Anyway, i seem to be having more trouble installing the I/O panel than the mobo :p  , I can't seem to get those bendy peices in right, what should i do?


I still need help with this, however trivial it may seem...
January 11, 2007 10:17:32 AM

How many threads did you put this on?
Quote:
Could someone PLEASE come help me in this thread?

Like right now.

For the front panel's pins, a tweezer worked well for my friend (he has huge hands). Mine are small enough to not have a problem with it. If you ever strouggle, just RTFM. That's the only advice I ever got before building my first couple of rigs.
January 11, 2007 2:12:59 PM

Here's my guide. I've been building for 20 years now and have many tips.

1) Take the case, remove the screws for mounting, take the side off, remove all the metal covers where the cd-roms go and covering all the pci slots. they say to keep them in for structure and better cooling but I recommend removing them so they arn't in the way down the road.

2) Take the board and install a threaded mount for each hole on your board. Don't put one if your board doesn't have a hole. Make sure each mount is the same height...don't mix different heights as you usually get 2 different heights. Also put the back plate into the case that came with your motherboard.

3) Take your board out of the static bag, put the static bag on top of the motherboard box, and put your board on the bag. Install the components this way, but never test the board this way since it will short out against the static bag. Test the board on the box alone no bag.

4) Put some compound on the CPU die using a razor blade to get a thin layer and install the CPU in the socket. Install your heatsink and remove the pink pad if it has one. Remove the heatsink and look for a square of compound meaning you installed the heatsink properly. Reinstall it. Set your jumpers if you have any, and seat your ram.

Don't install the cpu or ram while the board is inthe case cause the pressure of pressing into the board while mounted is bad. you want the box as a support.

5) Grab the board by the heatsink and put it in the case at an angle so the connections slide into the back plate and lower the board onto the mounts making sure they line up, you didn't miss any, and didn't put one where it doesn't belong. Make sure you don't scrape the bottom of the board when dropping and sliding it in.

6) Screw the board in. Its a good idea to try each screw into a spare mount to make sure it works and is the right size. It sux to put a wrong size screw into a mount only to have to remove your board and pull on it just to get a screw out. Don't use the red paper washers unless yoru screws have such a large head on them they overlap the copper pad on the board and will short something out. Use screws with a small head to secure the board.

7) Now you can install the PSU and drives. Don't put them in first as someone recommended since this can make installing the board more difficult with the drives in your way.

8) Install the PCI cards. Conenct all your cables and do your cable management.

9) Plug in and boot up and hope for the best.

That's about it. takes about 30min-1hr to complete. If you have any specific questions don't be afraid to ask.
January 11, 2007 9:22:05 PM

Quote:
Ok peeps, i got the mobo in without much issue, except for a faulty screw :wink:

Anyway, i seem to be having more trouble installing the I/O panel than the mobo :p  , I can't seem to get those bendy peices in right, what should i do?


Crap I knew I forgot something last night. You need to install the panel before you install your motherboard. :x

Where, directly on the mobo? or on the case? because the case doesn't have anywhere for it to mount. Anyway, for now i just pushed it against it and its stuck there. 8)

OK, I just hooked up the power and fan connectors and that, plus i added the RAM. Then i turned on the power. All the little LEDs lit up, but the HSF didn't spin, is that ok? Is it ok i turned it on... everything seems fine? :?
January 12, 2007 4:15:03 AM

Quote:
Then i turned on the power. All the little LEDs lit up, but the HSF didn't spin, is that ok?

Thats bad! really bad! Turn it off as fast as possible! If your fan isnt spinning the CPU is not being cooled it could burn itself up and maybe the motherboard. Make sure the HSF is plugged into the MB.

Something you mentioned at the start about reversing the direction of the HSF. What I said above isnt related but... Im kind of a stickler about thermal grease. The metal surfaces you are joining are mostly flat and porous. the grease fills gaps and tiny holes to transfer heat across the entire surface. Once its installed that thin layer is spread out to fill that orientations gaps. I recommend reapplying thermal grease for the change in orientation. Some might find that anal but its still my recommendation.
January 12, 2007 12:45:12 PM

The motherboard back plate pops in from inside the case towards the outside. You have to get one corner in the sort of work your way around and bang it in. Its tough. The back plate is often the most difficult thing to do.

The heatsink fna should be plugged into the CPU fan header on the motherboard. You should have a couple of auxilary fan headers for plugging in case fans. These are used to power your fans and also to get RPM gauges in windows. If you just power case fans off the power supply then it will work but you won't get the RPM gauges in windows. The heatsinks fan must go to the CPU fan header on the board. If it is not plugged in you may get a loud siren like on the Abit boards telling you your CPU fan isn't spinning.

First thing you do also is go in BIOS and check the RPM of your CPU fan and also the temp. Make ssure the heatsink isn't 180' backwards which will cause overheat.
January 12, 2007 6:09:56 PM

Oh boy....

1 First things first.. make sure you're doing this on a table away from Carpet. No point in building a computer if you're just going to short the whole thing by standing on Carpet.

2 Now... Grab the case first and start by pushing out the rear motherboard plate. Yes... you should be able to push out that generic motherboard plate that came with the case as the motherboard comes with one that is specifically designed for your particular motherboard.

3 Not that you've removed the generic plate.. from the inside of the case push in (snap in) the plate that came with the motherboard.

4 Once the plate is installed you can start by installing the motherboard mounts. They are gold colored (some are a white plastic) that mount on the inside/back of the case panel to hold teh motherboard in place. One this is done you're ready to install the motherboard.

5 Most cases will come with redish paper washers, if your particular case doesn't have any don't worry about it. Place the motherboard inside the case lining it up with the previously installed motherboard mounts (step 4). With the motherboard in place you can either screw in the motherboard or first, if you have them, install the redish paper washers then screwn the motherboard in place.

Voila the motherboard is installed.
January 13, 2007 4:11:48 AM

Well people, I kinda got bored and started to put it together, all of it, and I was impressed because I got it to post the first try :D  8)

Now I am trying to find the BIOS, so i can put them on a floppy and install them and boot the thing.

Its annoying, because my monitor order got cancelled by stupid tigerdirect because they sold me something they didn't actually have, so i keep having to take this monitor and switch it to the new comp, and then back here when i need the internet or something, plus i had to take this floppy out and put it in the new comp. :evil: 

As for cable mangement... well... the cables are in a mass near the middle, to the right of the mobo, basically on top of the HD. I bunched them there best i could, since i couldn't really do any mangement and they are going to different areas. I think the important part is they arn't blocking anything, except the tip of the very long 8800GTS, which took some manuevering to get in. At first i put it in the bottom PCIe slot since it was out of the way, but then the wires were in the way, so i had to move it up. And getting it out was a bitch. :wink:
January 13, 2007 4:23:12 AM

Quote:
Now I am trying to find the BIOS, so i can put them on a floppy and install them and boot the thing.

Really not clear on what you mean by that. The BIOS is a basic part of the motherboard and should already be there. In other words, the computer should already be booting. Are you saying it isn't? Or are you saying you are going to attempt to upgrade the BIOS to the latest version available from the Asus?

-john
a b B Homebuilt system
January 13, 2007 4:59:48 AM

Quote:
I know a fair amount about computers but this is the first time i'm actually building one. The stuff is in my sig. Could someone just give me a basic step by step so that i don't mess up and have to back track?

PS. How do you like my build? :p 


Correct me if im wrong but isn't that CPU a) very expensive and b) a poor overclocker and low performance for the price?

I would have gone with a core 2 duo or atleast a higher end AMD cpu, both would offer better value for your money.
January 13, 2007 6:35:19 AM

Quote:
Now I am trying to find the BIOS, so i can put them on a floppy and install them and boot the thing.

Really not clear on what you mean by that. The BIOS is a basic part of the motherboard and should already be there. In other words, the computer should already be booting. Are you saying it isn't? Or are you saying you are going to attempt to upgrade the BIOS to the latest version available from the Asus?

-john

I really don't know either. I can load the BIOS by pushing delete when its loading, then it shows the loading priority device or something. If i just let it go, without pushing delete, and pauses and then says disk boot failure, but i assume thats because there is nothing to load.

I dunno, wtf do i do? It'll be easier when i get a second monitor... :x

PS. Apache, i got it for $160 CAD like 2 months ago, and waited to buy the rest of the system. I thought that was a pretty good deal. Also, its overclocks the SAME as a normal x2 3800, xbit is just stupid and thought it would have extra headroom since it was undervolted...
January 13, 2007 4:35:53 PM

Anyone have an answer for this guy?
January 13, 2007 5:32:01 PM

1) google "sata drivers"
2) download drivers onto Floppy
3) put floppy drive in new PC and floppy disk in FDD
4) Put OS CD in cd drive
5) Turn on PC - boot into BIOS
6) Change boot priority to CD
7) boot off of CD
8) press F6 when windows starts to install (you need the sata drivers)
9) select the location off of your FDD
10) proceed with install[/code]
January 13, 2007 6:29:39 PM

Quote:
I dunno, wtf do i do? It'll be easier when i get a second monitor...

OK, it sounds like all you need to do is install your operating system. I assume you have some version of Windows XP, correct? (Could you post which version and if it has SP2 for future reference?)

The post by "sprite" is a short list of steps to take to install Windows. My suggestion would be to skip the parts that refer to "SATA drivers" the first time through. If you have a version of Windows XP that includes Service Pack 2 (SP2) then your Windows install CD should work fine without needing to bother with a driver floppy disk. (If the windows install fails because Windows can't find your hard drive, you can always try the floppy drive driver route at that time).

Before you start the install, I suggest you boot up your BIOS by pushing delete when your system is booting as you said. You'll want to check at least two things.

First, make sure your hard drive is "seen" by the BIOS. (I'm guessing that it is, but it's best to double check). One of the BIOS screens should show all the hard drives installed (just 1 in your case, correct?), their capacity, and their "access mode". The access mode should be something like "auto" or "IDE'. The important thing is that the BIOS is not trying to access the hard drive in RAID mode.

Second, look at that boot priority screen again. This screen shows you which devices are looked at to find an operating system to boot and specifies which order the devices are looked at. You want your CD to be the device looked at first and your hard drive to be the second.

Now insert your install CD and reboot the system. This time instead of a "nothing to load" message the computer should start loading windows from the CD. You may see a message like "Press any key to boot from CD". If you do press a key because booting from the CD is what you want to do as the first step in installing your OS.

After the windows install starts, follow the install instructions. As part of the install you will need to partition and format the hard drive. !Do a QUICK FORMAT! The regular format will take forever to complete and is overkill.

I'd also suggest making two partitions, a relatively "small" one (30GB?) for the Windows OS and another larger one (remainder of the disk) for just data like MP3s, video, et cetera. However, if that's more complicated than you want to bother with go with the Windows default. Use the entire disk for Windows and everything else combined in one partition.

Hope this helps. I'd strongly urge you to also go back and look at my post which pointed towards links to "how to build/install your computer" web pages. You can continue to get help on a "per post" basis here, but we're not going to be able to remember to cover everything. You'll learn a lot more about your options and how to set up your computer if you look at the guides already out there on the web.

Also read your motherboards instruction manual. There should be a section that describes how to install the OS. It may be worthless, but at least look for it to see if it's helpful. You also want to read the section of the user manual that discusses your motherboards BIOS options.

These Tom's articles may also be of some help to you.
How To Build A PC, Part 3: Putting It All Together
BIOS from A to Z

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
January 14, 2007 12:10:26 AM

BIOS = basic input output system

BIOS is the software that runs your hardware and allows your computer to function and load an OS. It is the software stored on a CMOS chip.

You can enter the BIOS setup utility by hitting DEL when booting. In here you need to tell the motherboard to boot from your CD-ROM first. Then you can boot from a windows CD and install windows.

The reason you got disk boot failure is because its trying to boot from the hard drive with no operating system.

You probably do not need SATA drivers like someone said cause the motherboard should treat the SATA hard drive like an IDE drive. Even so the motherboard might have been shipped with SATA drivers on a floppy drive if required.

Once you can get into windows you can update the BIOS. This is very easy if you have an Abit, MSI, Asus, Gigabyte, etc... motherboard that allows you to automatically update it through windows over the internet.

You also need to setup all the options in your BIOS properly so your computer runs best. If you have any specific question please post.
January 14, 2007 7:00:54 AM

BWHWHAHAHAHAAH....

I'm such an idiot.... the reason it said disk boot failure was because i had the dvd burner set as master instead of the rom, and the disk in the rom, so it had nothing to load. It occured to me a couple hours ago that it was s tupid to think the second IDE connection on the cable was the master, so i switched it, and guess what, i'm using the new comp 8)

I had a another problem. I couldn't get on the internet, but then realized i had to install chipset drivers...

Anywho, no that i have a working computer, i'll probably fix it up tomorrow, install some wires i didn't hook up yet and stuff, then make sure all the setting are good.

BTW, what is a good 3dmark06 score? I got almost 8000, but the cpu score was only like 1500, that seems low, although i know its an entry level processor... I haven't checked temps yet, so if it is hot i might have to reseat the thing and redo the AS5...

Anyway thanks people, i'm not done yet, and will probably post in this thread again if i get any trouble.
January 14, 2007 8:20:19 AM

BTW wouldnt an X2 3800 bottleneck an 8800GTS ?
January 14, 2007 1:53:19 PM

Make sure you go to the motherboard website and get the atest chipset dirvers, lan, etc.... Also get the utilities for doing a BIOS update via windows....the equivalent of the Abit uGuru. Always do this with a format.

Good luck and enjoy the new system.
January 16, 2007 4:55:09 PM

[/img]Ok peeps, i tried my hand at over clocking and i think it went pretty well for a first attempt.

I got the 3800 up to 2650mhz, and the RAM at 4-4-4-10 up to 1060mhz(I think?)

I'm gonna try to link a screen shot.

I forget how, I'll edit it when i figure it out. 8)

EDIT: LINK!

I wonder if image would work...

[/img]http://img478.imageshack.us/img478/4707/compstatslo3.pn...
!