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4:3 VS 16:9 - same resolution?

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Anonymous
April 26, 2004 6:32:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I'm looking at upgrading my old 30" conventional TV with an eye on
HDTV. Now there are some might fine 16:9 HD ready TVs out there and
I'm tempted, but I think there may be some advantages to sticking with
a 4:3 format. With a 36" 4:3 I can get ~32" equivalent 16:9 picture
yet have even more viewing area for the conventional 4:3 shows. And
a 36" 4:3 is much cheaper than a 32" 16:9. I think there are 4:3 TVs
out there that are 1080i capable. My question is this. If I'm
watching a HDTV station using the 4:3 TV (in letterbox format), but
dont have the HDTV tuner, will I get the same quality resolution
picture as watching the show on a 16:9 TV once again without a HDTV
tuner – assuming both TVs are 1080i capable. I currently have a DISH
satellite setup and it'll be a while before I have the $ for the
associated HD tuner. What is the maximum resolution with the SD feed?
Thanks, davenuc

More about : resolution

Anonymous
April 26, 2004 9:46:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

dave nuckles wrote:
> I'm looking at upgrading my old 30" conventional TV with an eye on
> HDTV. Now there are some might fine 16:9 HD ready TVs out there and
> I'm tempted, but I think there may be some advantages to sticking with
> a 4:3 format. With a 36" 4:3 I can get ~32" equivalent 16:9 picture
> yet have even more viewing area for the conventional 4:3 shows. And
> a 36" 4:3 is much cheaper than a 32" 16:9. I think there are 4:3 TVs
> out there that are 1080i capable. My question is this. If I'm
> watching a HDTV station using the 4:3 TV (in letterbox format), but
> dont have the HDTV tuner, will I get the same quality resolution
> picture as watching the show on a 16:9 TV once again without a HDTV
> tuner - assuming both TVs are 1080i capable. I currently have a DISH
> satellite setup and it'll be a while before I have the $ for the
> associated HD tuner. What is the maximum resolution with the SD feed?
> Thanks, davenuc

Your CRT set may upconvert the 480i signal to 480p. All RPTVs I've seen
do this, but to be honest, I've never checked the specs for a standard
CRT set. But I can't imagine it would be different. The TV will likely
convert to a 480p or a 540p signal. This gives you a progressive image
from the interlaced sources. Depending on the quality of your TVs
deinterlacer, you'll likely prefer the picture over the interlaced
source. The signal won't be as good as DVD quality, since NTSC uses less
resolution. However, downconverted STB HD channels look pretty close to
DVD quality, but that requires a HD STB.

--
David G.
Anonymous
April 27, 2004 3:08:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> Now there are some might fine 16:9 HD ready TVs out there and
> I'm tempted, but I think there may be some advantages to sticking with
> a 4:3 format. With a 36" 4:3 I can get ~32" equivalent 16:9 picture
> yet have even more viewing area for the conventional 4:3 shows. And
> a 36" 4:3 is much cheaper than a 32" 16:9.

You are right, it can be cheaper to get an HDTV with a 4:3 screen
around it instead of another hdtv of the same size without a 4:3
screen around it. Thus you can have the same size hdtv for less money
and get a larger 4:3 screen in addition.
I checked and an hdtv with a 36" 4:3 around it gives you a 33" hdtv. I
bet they don't even post the size of the hdtv screen because they are
really stupid. That kind of information is KINDA important. I used
this website to compute the size http://www.cavecreations.com/tv2.cgi
..

> My question is this.
> If I'm watching a HDTV station using the 4:3 TV (in letterbox format), but
> dont have the HDTV tuner, will I get the same quality resolution
> picture as watching the show on a 16:9 TV once again without a HDTV
> tuner ? assuming both TVs are 1080i capable. I currently have a DISH
> satellite setup and it'll be a while before I have the $ for the
> associated HD tuner. What is the maximum resolution with the SD feed?
> Thanks, davenuc

First I want to say that the 4:3 screens are NOT 1080i (or 720p or
1080p capable).

You say without an HDTV tuner and you say in letterbox mode. Letterbox
mode as you probably know is the term for a 16:9 picture inside a 4:3
picture. This is not the term for a 16:9 anamorphic picture. So I
assume that is what you meant. So you are saying if you are watching
an HD channel because you can read the hd channel but can only output
it in letterbox. Then will the picture on your 4:3 screen or some
16:9 set have the same quality resolution picture.

The letterbox picture on the 4:3 set will have a 16:9 image inside a
4:3 screen. BUT on the 16:9 set the 16:9 image will be inside a 4:3
inside a 16:9 screen. So your letter box image on a 16:9 set will be
extremely small and use very few pixels on the screen. I didn't
calculate the numbers but you can draw a picture of a 16:9 inside a
4:3 inside a 16:9 and you can get the point. If you cared about the
letterbox image then you should absolutely play it on the 4:3 screen
because it would be a extremely larger and use many more pixels.

I wouldn't be thinking about letterbox though. The FCC has finalized
the HDTV standard radio towers for over the air, but thats not really
usefull. 80% of america uses cable or satelite. ~99% of the people
interested in hdtv are in the 80% that subscribe to cable or
sattelite. The standards for HDTV on cable should be coming out this
year from what I've been told. I haven't been following satelite as
closely but the same should be roughly true. I don't think its going
to very expensive for the cable and satelite hardware because many
more people will be buying it and mass production will be lowering the
cost. Also the USA is the only country in the world (S. Korea for a
little while too) that uses the HDTV hardware system of 8VSB so nobody
is really excited about making hardware for that system since they
rest of the world uses the other system and it works better too with
better reception. So I say don't worry about ever getting an HDTV over
the air ATSC 8VSB receiver. The QAM receivers (for cable) and whatever
for sattelite will be the major way most people will get HDTV.
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Anonymous
April 30, 2004 11:37:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dave nuckles" <davenuc@excite.com> wrote in message
news:935d0c4d.0404261332.579d0b64@posting.google.com...
> I'm looking at upgrading my old 30" conventional TV with an eye on
> HDTV. Now there are some might fine 16:9 HD ready TVs out there and
> I'm tempted, but I think there may be some advantages to sticking with
> a 4:3 format. With a 36" 4:3 I can get ~32" equivalent 16:9 picture
> yet have even more viewing area for the conventional 4:3 shows. And
> a 36" 4:3 is much cheaper than a 32" 16:9.

*********
Unless you watch HDTV, most of what you see will be in the 4:3 format,
anyway.
*********


>I think there are 4:3 TVs out
>there that are 1080i capable
> My question is this. If I'm
> watching a HDTV station using the 4:3 TV (in letterbox format), but
> dont have the HDTV tuner, will I get the same quality resolution
> picture as watching the show on a 16:9 TV once again without a HDTV
> tuner - assuming both TVs are 1080i capable. I currently have a DISH
> satellite setup and it'll be a while before I have the $ for the
> associated HD tuner. What is the maximum resolution with the SD feed?
> Thanks, davenuc


*********
Without an HDTV tuner you can not watch an HDTV station!!! You can only
tune in the analog stations. The HDTV signal is always on a different
channel than the analog signal. So it doesn't matter what resolution the TV
set is capable of without the HDTV tuner.

You will have the same quality resolution on both sets: 480i. The HDTV
set will convert the (effective) 480i analog signal to display on your 1080i
HDTV set, but you started with 480i, and it will never get up to 1080i
quality. The picture on the 16:9 set will be surrounded by black, the 4:3
set will have black on top and bottom only. But both will be pretty close
to equal in resolution.

The line doublers in the sets will improve the picture a little (up to
EDTV if you're lucky), but you will never see HDTV without a "digital tuner"
(for over the air broadcast), or an "HDTV converter box" (for cable or
satellite).

An SD feed can be as good as 480i or 480p. (480P is called EDTV for some
stupid reason).

HDTV is either 720 or 1080, period. Anything less than 720 is called
SDTV or EDTV.


"No HDTV tuner" always equals no HDTV.




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Anonymous
May 1, 2004 11:57:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"That Guy" <somebody@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:4092f181_7@corp.newsgroups.com...
:
: *********
: Unless you watch HDTV, most of what you see will be in the 4:3
format,
: anyway.
: *********
========================
Which will change this next season.
Many of the prime time shows will simply be downconverted from the HD
and will be 16:9 on regular TV too.
============================
!