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What's EDTV?

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Anonymous
April 28, 2004 12:14:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I saw at stores that some TV sets are labeled with EDTV on the
sales tag? What is it? What is it different from HDTV?

More about : edtv

April 28, 2004 8:35:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"smallox" <smallox@qt.com> wrote in message
news:h98u80h41ddnufhuhb4b3d3le7ih96pvh2@4ax.com...
> I saw at stores that some TV sets are labeled with EDTV on the
> sales tag? What is it? What is it different from HDTV?
>

Taken from:
http://hdtv.0catch.com/#Q:%20What%20is%20the%20differen...

Q: What is the difference between EDTV, HDTV and normal TV?

A: EDTV is defined in the US as 480p (704X480 progressive scan), it's not
quite considered HDTV quality, but it meets the FCC regulations for the
mandatory switch to "DTV" by 2006 (more on this soon). Most all HDTVs can
also view 480p broadcast and some HD receivers will "down convert" HD
signals to support 480p. This is all being done to help push what is
collectively being called "Digital Television" ( DTV). You should also note
that since there is no official standard for HDTV, some EDTVs are being sold
as HDTVs, without an official HDTV standard salesmen and even manufacturers
can call their televisions HDTVs as long as they meet DTV standards. If you
want true HDTV look for 1080p, 1080i or 720p support, without any of these
up front on the spec sheet, the set you're looking at is most likely an
EDTV.

"Normal TV" or SDTV (Standard Definition, in the US this is the common NTSC
signal all TV's can pull out the air) also refers to Standard Cable, Digital
Cable, Satellite, etc. SDTV is never absolute, but it's maximum resolution
is approx 483x525 interlaced. It is sometimes referred to as 480i when
broadcast as a digital feed (e.g. Digital Cable). Non progressive scan
digital converter boxes (common with most Digital Cable and Satellite
receivers) usually have the ability to output the converted analog signal up
to 720x480i, however no one is actually broadcasting at this resolution.
Instead the more common practice for providers is to squeeze the signal as
tight as possible, but it's really impossible to measure the exact
horizontal lines for SDTV broadcast because they most commonly originate as
an analog signal. Unlike digital (where we can measure pixels like units)
analog signals are not absolute. What is commonly measured are the vertical
scan lines which average between 480-525 (usually coming in on the lower
end, unless the picture is coming from a high resolution source such as
S-VHS or DVD through S-Video input)

If you compare the total pixel count of each format, here's how they compare
(in terms of how much data is being shown per frame): Note: this does not
take into consideration refresh rates which vary on each model. This should
be considered a general metric of the quality difference between formats.

Sampling of DTV formats
HDTV 1080p - (1920(1080) = 2073600
HDTV 1080i - ((1920(1080/2)) = 1036800
HDTV 720p - (1280(720) = 921600
EDTV 480p - (480(704) = 337920
SDTV 480i - (480(704/2) = 168960

Analog television format
*NTSC 480i - ((483(525/2)) = 126788

* Based on average non progressive analog to digital conversion like that
found in digital cable boxes.



Note: although 1080i has more data per frame, 720p is actually considered by
most to be the higher standard, this is because of the nature of interlaced
display vs progressive scan in terms of flicker and screen artifacts, since
1080i contains more data per frame it's still a hot subject of debate and
the argument comes back to the performance vs quality. 720p will provide a
smoother picture, 1080i will provide a higher resolution picture. 1080p
offers the highest quality HD image and retains the benefits of progressive
scan, however few models offer native support for this format.



HTH,



Duke
April 29, 2004 4:10:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

That's all very nice, but you'll find NO definition of EDTV at the FCC/ATSC.
480p is - just like 480i - defined as SDTV. But Fox thanks you for
thinking so. They invented it to tout their 480p broadcasts.


"Duke" <sorry@spam.com> wrote in message
news:5wGjc.527757$Po1.444078@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
>
> "smallox" <smallox@qt.com> wrote in message
> news:h98u80h41ddnufhuhb4b3d3le7ih96pvh2@4ax.com...
> > I saw at stores that some TV sets are labeled with EDTV on the
> > sales tag? What is it? What is it different from HDTV?
> >
>
> Taken from:
>
http://hdtv.0catch.com/#Q:%20What%20is%20the%20differen...
>
> Q: What is the difference between EDTV, HDTV and normal TV?
>
> A: EDTV is defined in the US as 480p (704X480 progressive scan), it's not
> quite considered HDTV quality, but it meets the FCC regulations for the
> mandatory switch to "DTV" by 2006 (more on this soon). Most all HDTVs can
> also view 480p broadcast and some HD receivers will "down convert" HD
> signals to support 480p. This is all being done to help push what is
> collectively being called "Digital Television" ( DTV). You should also
note
> that since there is no official standard for HDTV, some EDTVs are being
sold
> as HDTVs, without an official HDTV standard salesmen and even
manufacturers
> can call their televisions HDTVs as long as they meet DTV standards. If
you
> want true HDTV look for 1080p, 1080i or 720p support, without any of these
> up front on the spec sheet, the set you're looking at is most likely an
> EDTV.
>
> "Normal TV" or SDTV (Standard Definition, in the US this is the common
NTSC
> signal all TV's can pull out the air) also refers to Standard Cable,
Digital
> Cable, Satellite, etc. SDTV is never absolute, but it's maximum resolution
> is approx 483x525 interlaced. It is sometimes referred to as 480i when
> broadcast as a digital feed (e.g. Digital Cable). Non progressive scan
> digital converter boxes (common with most Digital Cable and Satellite
> receivers) usually have the ability to output the converted analog signal
up
> to 720x480i, however no one is actually broadcasting at this resolution.
> Instead the more common practice for providers is to squeeze the signal
as
> tight as possible, but it's really impossible to measure the exact
> horizontal lines for SDTV broadcast because they most commonly originate
as
> an analog signal. Unlike digital (where we can measure pixels like units)
> analog signals are not absolute. What is commonly measured are the
vertical
> scan lines which average between 480-525 (usually coming in on the lower
> end, unless the picture is coming from a high resolution source such as
> S-VHS or DVD through S-Video input)
>
> If you compare the total pixel count of each format, here's how they
compare
> (in terms of how much data is being shown per frame): Note: this does not
> take into consideration refresh rates which vary on each model. This
should
> be considered a general metric of the quality difference between formats.
>
> Sampling of DTV formats
> HDTV 1080p - (1920(1080) = 2073600
> HDTV 1080i - ((1920(1080/2)) = 1036800
> HDTV 720p - (1280(720) = 921600
> EDTV 480p - (480(704) = 337920
> SDTV 480i - (480(704/2) = 168960
>
> Analog television format
> *NTSC 480i - ((483(525/2)) = 126788
>
> * Based on average non progressive analog to digital conversion like that
> found in digital cable boxes.
>
>
>
> Note: although 1080i has more data per frame, 720p is actually considered
by
> most to be the higher standard, this is because of the nature of
interlaced
> display vs progressive scan in terms of flicker and screen artifacts,
since
> 1080i contains more data per frame it's still a hot subject of debate and
> the argument comes back to the performance vs quality. 720p will provide a
> smoother picture, 1080i will provide a higher resolution picture. 1080p
> offers the highest quality HD image and retains the benefits of
progressive
> scan, however few models offer native support for this format.
>
>
>
> HTH,
>
>
>
> Duke
>
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 29, 2004 10:40:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

This is why many claim there is no "offical" definition for what is
High Definition and what isn't. The closest you'll get is at the ATSC
website is this document:

http://www.atsc.org/standards/a_54a.pdf

In this document they define the 18 formats that constitute DTV in the
US. Because of the signifigant (and visibily noticable) gap between
480p and the higher resolutions (720p/1080i/1080p) the top three are
commonly refered to as High Definition. 480p is called Enhanced
Definition everywhere except for dishonest or uninform salesmen who
sell many Plasma and LCD monitors under the name HDTV when in fact
they aren't?

If it's a subjective thing how can I claim they aren't? Namely because
of broadcast standards that have been adapted in the US. For "HD"
Every network broadcast in 1080i or 720p. Those are the two DTV
formats supported for HDTV in the US. So if you TV only supports 720p
the signal has to be signifigantly down graded before you see the
image.


-James

"Curmudgeon" <gary@nospam.com> wrote in message news:<Ta%jc.53474$Uz1.40512@bignews3.bellsouth.net>...
> That's all very nice, but you'll find NO definition of EDTV at the FCC/ATSC.
> 480p is - just like 480i - defined as SDTV. But Fox thanks you for
> thinking so. They invented it to tout their 480p broadcasts.
>
>
> "Duke" <sorry@spam.com> wrote in message
> news:5wGjc.527757$Po1.444078@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
> >
> > "smallox" <smallox@qt.com> wrote in message
> > news:h98u80h41ddnufhuhb4b3d3le7ih96pvh2@4ax.com...
> > > I saw at stores that some TV sets are labeled with EDTV on the
> > > sales tag? What is it? What is it different from HDTV?
> > >
> >
> > Taken from:
> >
> http://hdtv.0catch.com/#Q:%20What%20is%20the%20differen...
> >
> > Q: What is the difference between EDTV, HDTV and normal TV?
> >
> > A: EDTV is defined in the US as 480p (704X480 progressive scan), it's not
> > quite considered HDTV quality, but it meets the FCC regulations for the
> > mandatory switch to "DTV" by 2006 (more on this soon). Most all HDTVs can
> > also view 480p broadcast and some HD receivers will "down convert" HD
> > signals to support 480p. This is all being done to help push what is
> > collectively being called "Digital Television" ( DTV). You should also
> note
> > that since there is no official standard for HDTV, some EDTVs are being
> sold
> > as HDTVs, without an official HDTV standard salesmen and even
> manufacturers
> > can call their televisions HDTVs as long as they meet DTV standards. If
> you
> > want true HDTV look for 1080p, 1080i or 720p support, without any of these
> > up front on the spec sheet, the set you're looking at is most likely an
> > EDTV.
> >
> > "Normal TV" or SDTV (Standard Definition, in the US this is the common
> NTSC
> > signal all TV's can pull out the air) also refers to Standard Cable,
> Digital
> > Cable, Satellite, etc. SDTV is never absolute, but it's maximum resolution
> > is approx 483x525 interlaced. It is sometimes referred to as 480i when
> > broadcast as a digital feed (e.g. Digital Cable). Non progressive scan
> > digital converter boxes (common with most Digital Cable and Satellite
> > receivers) usually have the ability to output the converted analog signal
> up
> > to 720x480i, however no one is actually broadcasting at this resolution.
> > Instead the more common practice for providers is to squeeze the signal
> as
> > tight as possible, but it's really impossible to measure the exact
> > horizontal lines for SDTV broadcast because they most commonly originate
> as
> > an analog signal. Unlike digital (where we can measure pixels like units)
> > analog signals are not absolute. What is commonly measured are the
> vertical
> > scan lines which average between 480-525 (usually coming in on the lower
> > end, unless the picture is coming from a high resolution source such as
> > S-VHS or DVD through S-Video input)
> >
> > If you compare the total pixel count of each format, here's how they
> compare
> > (in terms of how much data is being shown per frame): Note: this does not
> > take into consideration refresh rates which vary on each model. This
> should
> > be considered a general metric of the quality difference between formats.
> >
> > Sampling of DTV formats
> > HDTV 1080p - (1920(1080) = 2073600
> > HDTV 1080i - ((1920(1080/2)) = 1036800
> > HDTV 720p - (1280(720) = 921600
> > EDTV 480p - (480(704) = 337920
> > SDTV 480i - (480(704/2) = 168960
> >
> > Analog television format
> > *NTSC 480i - ((483(525/2)) = 126788
> >
> > * Based on average non progressive analog to digital conversion like that
> > found in digital cable boxes.
> >
> >
> >
> > Note: although 1080i has more data per frame, 720p is actually considered
> by
> > most to be the higher standard, this is because of the nature of
> interlaced
> > display vs progressive scan in terms of flicker and screen artifacts,
> since
> > 1080i contains more data per frame it's still a hot subject of debate and
> > the argument comes back to the performance vs quality. 720p will provide a
> > smoother picture, 1080i will provide a higher resolution picture. 1080p
> > offers the highest quality HD image and retains the benefits of
> progressive
> > scan, however few models offer native support for this format.
> >
> >
> >
> > HTH,
> >
> >
> >
> > Duke
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
!