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Perspicacia

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Anonymous
February 4, 2005 4:17:59 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my keyboard,
keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..

Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the word
"benefited".
That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".

Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English ones,
anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American alternative, given
his documented/published objective in compiling it was to "simplify" English
for an exclusively American readership##. Curiously, many of his
"simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be) superfluous letters - in
"benefitted" he added one!

##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).

Apols for typo. Len.

More about : perspicacia

Anonymous
February 4, 2005 6:14:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few letters
along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!

--


Will Denny
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
Please reply to the News Groups


"Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my keyboard,
> keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>
> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
> word "benefited".
> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>
> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English ones,
> anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American alternative,
> given his documented/published objective in compiling it was to "simplify"
> English for an exclusively American readership##. Curiously, many of his
> "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be) superfluous letters - in
> "benefitted" he added one!
>
> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>
> Apols for typo. Len.
>
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 6:45:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about his
work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so, please
look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
(i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!

As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of 35
years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .

Thanks, Len

"Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>
> --
>
>
> Will Denny
> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
> Please reply to the News Groups
>
>
> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>
>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>> word "benefited".
>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>
>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it was
>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>
>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>
>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 6:54:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I've got a very old Webster's - updated, no doubt, by now. Plural of Forum
is Fora - like it or not!!

--


Will Denny
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
Please reply to the News Groups


"Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about
> his work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the
> plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>
> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of
> 35 years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are
> still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>
> Thanks, Len
>
> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> Will Denny
>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>
>>
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>
>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>> word "benefited".
>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>
>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>> was to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>
>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>
>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 11:17:44 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:u3WQB1mCFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
| I've got a very old Webster's - updated, no doubt, by now. Plural of
Forum
| is Fora - like it or not!!

"Forums" is correct, and "Fora," while technically OK, is hopelessly
pedantic. There's no point in using the Latin plural forms of words like
"forum" and "stadium" and "aquarium." When was the last time you heard
someone refer to a single piece of information as a "datum" which is the
singular form of "data"? Even scientific and other technical writers who
insist on using "data" with a plural verb never use the singular form.
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:34:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie thinks.

This is what MS says

forum

forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
[Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]

(c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved


MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of the 1990s are well served.

The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language: International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about his
> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so, please
> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
> (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>
> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of 35
> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
> recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
> interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
> no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>
> Thanks, Len
>
> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> Will Denny
>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>
>>
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>
>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>> word "benefited".
>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>
>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it was
>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>
>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>
>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:34:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks, Will - just what I thought. Perspicacia (who initiated this
ludicrous argument in the first place) clearly has no got an English
dictionary, just (possibly) an American one, and her "old English tutor" was
equally limited when teaching "English", or her memory is at fault.
Curiosity satisfied, bug laid to rest.

David, thanks also - Larousse agrees with my books of reference.

Sincerely, Len.


"David Candy" <.> wrote in message
news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie
thinks.

This is what MS says

forum

forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as opposed
to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
[Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]

(c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved


MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the
language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition, careful
attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of the
1990s are well served.

The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language: International
Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the
same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and
americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific
notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly
British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol -
dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL +
INE)
--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about
> his
> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so, please
> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
> (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>
> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of
> 35
> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
> recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
> interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
> no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>
> Thanks, Len
>
> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> Will Denny
>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>
>>
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>
>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>> word "benefited".
>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>
>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>> was
>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>
>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>
>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:40:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"David Candy" <.> wrote in message news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie thinks.

This is what MS says

forum

forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
[Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]

(c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved


MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of the 1990s are well served.

The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language: International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about his
> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so, please
> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
> (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>
> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of 35
> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
> recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
> interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
> no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>
> Thanks, Len
>
> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> Will Denny
>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>
>>
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>
>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>> word "benefited".
>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>
>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it was
>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>
>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>
>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
February 5, 2005 6:41:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks to Miss P for initiating this wonderful series of posts. In the end:
one has a right to and may use the spelling of the English language in
whatever manner they wish.

It is however, important to maintain correct usage and spelling, according
to the authoritive texts of their homeland.

In the UK one should defer to Oxford. In Australia to Macquarie [if one
must sway from OXford]. In America ...well is there any authority on the
language? It appears not as Microsoft prefers Chambers ahead of Webster!



"Yabbadoo" wrote:

> Thanks, Will - just what I thought. Perspicacia (who initiated this
> ludicrous argument in the first place) clearly has no got an English
> dictionary, just (possibly) an American one, and her "old English tutor" was
> equally limited when teaching "English", or her memory is at fault.
> Curiosity satisfied, bug laid to rest.
>
> David, thanks also - Larousse agrees with my books of reference.
>
> Sincerely, Len.
>
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie
> thinks.
>
> This is what MS says
>
> forum
>
> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as opposed
> to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
> publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
> fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>
> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>
>
> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
> dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the
> language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition, careful
> attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of the
> 1990s are well served.
>
> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language: International
> Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the
> same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and
> americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific
> notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly
> British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol -
> dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL +
> INE)
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
> > Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
> > general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about
> > his
> > work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so, please
> > look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
> > (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
> >
> > As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of
> > 35
> > years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
> > recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
> > interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
> > no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
> > Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
> >
> > Thanks, Len
> >
> > "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
> >> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
> >>
> >> --
> >>
> >>
> >> Will Denny
> >> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
> >> Please reply to the News Groups
> >>
> >>
> >> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
> >> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
> >>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
> >>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
> >>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
> >>>
> >>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
> >>> word "benefited".
> >>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
> >>>
> >>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
> >>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
> >>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
> >>> was
> >>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
> >>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
> >>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
> >>>
> >>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
> >>>
> >>> Apols for typo. Len.
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
>
February 6, 2005 1:31:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

In my humble opinion, I think most have missed the point (including Miss P
in her earlier 'corrective' post).
Language is a means of communication between people; if one understands what
the other said, that's all that's required - understanding..
If you had to stick continually to correct spelling from various
dictionaries, we would still be speaking & typing in 'ye olde english' from
centuries ago.

NGs for example have developed thir own slanguage, "yuo" instead of "you"
for speed and ease of typing.
Who cares, as long as you understand the question.

Language has continually gradually changed since it first started to
develop - that's how languages develop (unless you are sitting for a school
essay exam or similar and get marked down for incorrect spelling, that's
when the dictionaries start to come out.

On the other hand, you have English English & American English - but that's
another story.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It also can reach the point of ridiculousness, (but still be completely
understandable) as in this old chestnut example -

EuroEnglish (The language of the new millenium)



The European Commissioners have announced that an agreement has been reached
to adopt English as the preferred language for European communications,
rather than German, which was the other possibility.



As part of the negotiations, Her Majesty's Government conceded that English
spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a five-year phased
plan for what will be known as EuroEnglish (Euro for short).



In the first year, "s" will be used instead of the soft "c".

Sertainley, sivil servants will resieve this news with joy.

Also, the hard "c" will be replaced with "k". Not only will this klear up
konfusion, but typewriters and komputers kan have one less letter.

There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year, when the
troublesome "ph" will be replaced by "f". This will make words like
"fotograf" 20 percent shorter.

In the third year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to
reach the stage

where more komplikated changes are possible.

Governments will enkorage the removal of double letters, which have always
ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes
of silent "e"s in the languag is disgrasful, and they would go.

By the fourth year, peopl wil be replasing "th" by "z" and "w" by "v".
During ze fifz year,

ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou", and similar
changes vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters.

After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl. Zer vil be no mor
trubls or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech ozer.



Ze drem vil finali kum tru.

--

johnf

> Thanks to Miss P for initiating this wonderful series of posts. In the
> end: one has a right to and may use the spelling of the English
> language in whatever manner they wish.
>
> It is however, important to maintain correct usage and spelling,
> according to the authoritive texts of their homeland.
>
> In the UK one should defer to Oxford. In Australia to Macquarie [if one
> must sway from OXford]. In America ...well is there any authority on
> the language? It appears not as Microsoft prefers Chambers ahead of
> Webster!
>
>
>
> "Yabbadoo" wrote:
>
>> Thanks, Will - just what I thought. Perspicacia (who initiated this
>> ludicrous argument in the first place) clearly has no got an English
>> dictionary, just (possibly) an American one, and her "old English
>> tutor" was equally limited when teaching "English", or her memory is
>> at fault. Curiosity satisfied, bug laid to rest.
>>
>> David, thanks also - Larousse agrees with my books of reference.
>>
>> Sincerely, Len.
>>
>>
>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>
>> This is what MS says
>>
>> forum
>>
>> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>> debate:
>> fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>
>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>
>>
>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
>> dictionary's editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in
>> the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language
>> and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>
>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common
>> to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention
>> of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries.
>> EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever that
>> is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say
>> gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> http://www.uscricket.com
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>> > Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>> > mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>> > reading about his
>> > work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>> > please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of
>> > the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>> >
>> > As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>> > part of 35
>> > years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>> > very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>> > acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"'
>> > words are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to
>> > mind.)
>> > Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>> >
>> > Thanks, Len
>> >
>> > "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>> > news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> >> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>> >> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> Will Denny
>> >> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>> >> Please reply to the News Groups
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>> >>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>> >>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to
>> >>> service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night -
>> >>> again..
>> >>>
>> >>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR
>> >>> used the word "benefited".
>> >>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>> >>>
>> >>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>> >>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>> >>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published objective
>> >>> in compiling it was
>> >>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>> >>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed
>> >>> to be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>> >>>
>> >>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>> >>>
>> >>> Apols for typo. Len.
February 7, 2005 7:56:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi David,

Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to have a
hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging around,
especially when moving to another country. I now use web based dictionaries
and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t know if the online
site I`m using is British English or American English. I know us Americans
can easily slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London are
slaughtering the spoken language.

I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe some
video images of interviews in London, and I being a native English speaker
(used to different accents of English as well, British, Scottish, Indian,
European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was being said out of the peoples
mouths. I know we Americans sometimes have some strong accents when
speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what was being spoken from these Brits was
English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you
for the insight.

Jeff

"David Candy" <.> wrote in message
news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"David Candy" <.> wrote in message
news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie
thinks.

This is what MS says

forum

forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as opposed
to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
[Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]

(c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved


MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the
language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition, careful
attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of the
1990s are well served.

The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language: International
Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the
same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and
americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific
notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly
British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol -
dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL +
INE)
--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about
> his
> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so, please
> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
> (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>
> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of
> 35
> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
> recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
> interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
> no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>
> Thanks, Len
>
> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> Will Denny
>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>
>>
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>
>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>> word "benefited".
>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>
>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>> was
>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>
>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>
>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
February 7, 2005 11:08:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see if we
can sort this discrepancy out a bit.


--

johnf

> Hi David,
>
> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging
> around, especially when moving to another country. I now use web based
> dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t
> know if the online site I`m using is British English or American
> English. I know us Americans can easily slaughter a written language,
> but I think the Brits in London are slaughtering the spoken language.
>
> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe some
> video images of interviews in London, and I being a native English
> speaker (used to different accents of English as well, British,
> Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was being said
> out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes have some
> strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what was being
> spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of
> your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>
> Jeff
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
> Macquarrie thinks.
>
> This is what MS says
>
> forum
>
> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>
> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>
>
> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
> dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in
> the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language
> and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>
> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common
> to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention
> of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG
> for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever that is
> - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say
> gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>> reading about his
>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of
>> the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>
>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part
>> of 35
>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words
>> are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>
>> Thanks, Len
>>
>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>
>>> Will Denny
>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>
>>>
>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread
>>>> "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>
>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used
>>>> the word "benefited".
>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>
>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>>> was
>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to
>>>> be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>
>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>
>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
February 7, 2005 11:08:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi John,

I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a public
broadcast program within England about usage of computers being introduced
into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews were with
teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in kindengarden and
middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years ago. They showed it on
Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and stuff transcribed so the
translaters could put up the subtitles or do the dubbing.

Jeff

"johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see if we
> can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>
>
> --
>
> johnf
>
>> Hi David,
>>
>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging
>> around, especially when moving to another country. I now use web based
>> dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t
>> know if the online site I`m using is British English or American
>> English. I know us Americans can easily slaughter a written language,
>> but I think the Brits in London are slaughtering the spoken language.
>>
>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe some
>> video images of interviews in London, and I being a native English
>> speaker (used to different accents of English as well, British,
>> Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was being said
>> out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes have some
>> strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what was being
>> spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of
>> your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>
>> Jeff
>>
>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> http://www.uscricket.com
>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>
>> This is what MS says
>>
>> forum
>>
>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BŒ$(B,
>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>
>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>
>>
>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
>> dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in
>> the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language
>> and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>
>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common
>> to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention
>> of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG
>> for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever that is
>> - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say
>> gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> http://www.uscricket.com
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>> reading about his
>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of
>>> the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>
>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part
>>> of 35
>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words
>>> are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>
>>> Thanks, Len
>>>
>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Will Denny
>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread
>>>>> "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>>
>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used
>>>>> the word "benefited".
>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>
>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>>>> was
>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to
>>>>> be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>
>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>
>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>
>
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:08:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Mon, 7 Feb 2005 18:22:02 +0900, "jeffrey"
<jeffrey@nospam.okinawa.com> wrote:

>Hi John,
>
>I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a public
>broadcast program within England about usage of computers being introduced
>into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews were with
>teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in kindengarden and
>middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years ago. They showed it on
>Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and stuff transcribed so the
>translaters could put up the subtitles or do the dubbing.
>
>Jeff
>
>"johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see if we
>> can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> johnf
>>
>>> Hi David,
>>>
>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging
>>> around, especially when moving to another country. I now use web based
>>> dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t
>>> know if the online site I`m using is British English or American
>>> English. I know us Americans can easily slaughter a written language,
>>> but I think the Brits in London are slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>
>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe some
>>> video images of interviews in London, and I being a native English
>>> speaker (used to different accents of English as well, British,
>>> Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was being said
>>> out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes have some
>>> strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what was being
>>> spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of
>>> your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>>
>>> Jeff
>>>
>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>
>>> This is what MS says
>>>
>>> forum
>>>
>>> forum fo?rem or f?,
>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>
>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>
>>>
>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
>>> dictionary? editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in
>>> the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language
>>> and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>
>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common
>>> to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention
>>> of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG
>>> for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever that is
>>> - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say
>>> gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>> reading about his
>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of
>>>> the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>
>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part
>>>> of 35
>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words
>>>> are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>
>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>
>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread
>>>>>> "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used
>>>>>> the word "benefited".
>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>>>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>>>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>>>>> was
>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to
>>>>>> be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>
>>
I think I'm getting the hang of pluralization.
So, AVI is the plural form of Avum?

Neat.
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:08:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 10:53:41 GMT, Turgid Humpster wrote:

> I think I'm getting the hang of pluralization.
> So, AVI is the plural form of Avum?
>
> Neat.

and that comment results in cleanup for one monitor and one keyboard.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:09:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

The ultimate clean-up is RIP ( singular or plural, piece or pieces) :-)
Len
"Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
news:o Nbzm5QDFHA.2232@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 10:53:41 GMT, Turgid Humpster wrote:
>
>> I think I'm getting the hang of pluralization.
>> So, AVI is the plural form of Avum?
>>
>> Neat.
>
> and that comment results in cleanup for one monitor and one keyboard.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
February 7, 2005 11:41:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with which
most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a compulsory school
course - but to what or who's standard??
Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct English,
American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in "The
Bill" :-)


--

johnf

> Hi John,
>
> I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a
> public broadcast program within England about usage of computers being
> introduced into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews
> were with teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in
> kindengarden and middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years
> ago. They showed it on Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and
> stuff transcribed so the translaters could put up the subtitles or do
> the dubbing.
> Jeff
>
> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
> news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see
>> if we can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> johnf
>>
>>> Hi David,
>>>
>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging
>>> around, especially when moving to another country. I now use web
>>> based dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I
>>> don`t know if the online site I`m using is British English or American
>>> English. I know us Americans can easily slaughter a written language,
>>> but I think the Brits in London are slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>
>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>> was being spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to
>>> waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>>
>>> Jeff
>>>
>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>
>>> This is what MS says
>>>
>>> forum
>>>
>>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BŒ$(B,
>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>
>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>
>>>
>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>> the dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes
>>> in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language
>>> and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>
>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common
>>> to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention
>>> of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries.
>>> EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever
>>> that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't
>>> say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>> reading about his
>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of
>>>> the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>
>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>> part of 35
>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words
>>>> are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>
>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>
>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to
>>>>>> service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night -
>>>>>> again..
>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used
>>>>>> the word "benefited".
>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published objective
>>>>>> in compiling it was
>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to
>>>>>> be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:41:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Mon, 7 Feb 2005 20:41:05 +1100, "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a>
wrote:

>What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with which
>most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a compulsory school
>course - but to what or who's standard??
>Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
>Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct English,
>American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
>but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in "The
>Bill" :-)


"Who's" ?

Arh, be that not a contraction for "Who is" ?

The possesive shall be spelled "Whose", else beware the boxer of ears.

Or might it be The Boxer of Ears?
I heard that he he lives under a bridge somewhere.
Likely, a troll bridge.
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:41:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

John - understanding The Bill (allegedly, Cockney English?) The BBC did a
course in Cockney rhyming slang, for "Eastenders", for the Americans. The
trick is knowing phrase origins, since "rhyming" is often a misnomer in
actual Cockney-speak.
Examples - "going up the apples", originates from "apples and pears" =
stairs (so translates to "going upstairs") "Me farmers are playing me up" -
"farmers" = Farmer Giles, = piles (haemorrhoids, US hemorrhoids) so "my
piles are painful" altho I prefer the idiomatic "playing me up", it's more
emotive. (yeah, have probs!)

A real quirk, constantly used - ".....pain in the 'arris".
'Arris = "Aristotle", rhyme for "bottle", shortened from "bottle and glass",
so actual meaning, "pain in the arse" (US, ass). There's an English
"North/South divide" with pronunciation.

Spoken in the South, "glass" is pronounced "glarse". "butter" as "batter"
....I'm a Northerner living in the South. I take a bath, not a "barth".
(hard a, as in "cat").

Just be glad that you're not watching TV detective "Taggart". It's based in
Glasgow, primarily Glaswegian actors. Trying to cope with the very thick
accent AND Scots dialect words... it's another language. And, for utterly
complete incomprehensibility - Geordie (Newcastle dialect)? GBH on the
eardrums!

Learning English, real problem is not vocabulary, but the spoken form.
Germans and the French have great difficulty with "W" words (Germans make
"we", "vee", the French, "zee") because the "We" vocal sound doesn't exist
in their language. How much more difficult for non-Aryan races? Same problem
in reverse for Brits learning other languages.

All Scandinavia, Belgium and Holland are mainly multi-lingual. English as a
second language is often taught from primary school. Belgium and Holland
are routinely tri-lingual, which makes practical sense when you look at
their geography. One Belgian co-worker I know was fluent in 6 languages.

Purest spoken English I ever heard was from groups of people (not one
individual) from Sweden and Holland - flawless, fluent, not a trace of
accent. The "Queen's English" (used to be BBC English) - defined as "English
as spoken by the educated Southern gentleman".

Regards, Len.

"johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
news:%23ipGlkPDFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with which
> most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a compulsory
> school course - but to what or who's standard??
> Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
> Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct English,
> American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
> but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in
> "The Bill" :-)
>
>
> --
>
> johnf
>
>> Hi John,
>>
>> I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a
>> public broadcast program within England about usage of computers being
>> introduced into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews
>> were with teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in
>> kindengarden and middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years
>> ago. They showed it on Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and
>> stuff transcribed so the translaters could put up the subtitles or do
>> the dubbing.
>> Jeff
>>
>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>> news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see
>>> if we can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>> johnf
>>>
>>>> Hi David,
>>>>
>>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging
>>>> around, especially when moving to another country. I now use web
>>>> based dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I
>>>> don`t know if the online site I`m using is British English or American
>>>> English. I know us Americans can easily slaughter a written language,
>>>> but I think the Brits in London are slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>>
>>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>>> was being spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to
>>>> waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>>>
>>>> Jeff
>>>>
>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>>
>>>> This is what MS says
>>>>
>>>> forum
>>>>
>>>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BO$(B,
>>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>>>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>>>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>>
>>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>>> the dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the contemporary
>>>> changes
>>>> in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language
>>>> and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>>
>>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>>>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common
>>>> to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention
>>>> of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries.
>>>> EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever
>>>> that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't
>>>> say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
>>>> --
>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>>> reading about his
>>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of
>>>>> the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>>
>>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>>> part of 35
>>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words
>>>>> are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>>>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>>
>>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to
>>>>>>> service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night -
>>>>>>> again..
>>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used
>>>>>>> the word "benefited".
>>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published objective
>>>>>>> in compiling it was
>>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to
>>>>>>> be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>
>
February 8, 2005 3:35:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bugger. I missed that one. Just shows that nobody's perfect. I wont blame it
on slanguage; just a typo.
Luckily we don't have troll bridges here (well, not that I've seen in my 72
years), toll bridges - yes, but that's a different point of current heated
discussion.

--

johnf

> On Mon, 7 Feb 2005 20:41:05 +1100, "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a>
> wrote:
>
>>What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with
>>which most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a
>>compulsory school course - but to what or who's standard??
>>Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
>>Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct
>>English, American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
>>but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in
>>"The Bill" :-)
>
>
> "Who's" ?
>
> Arh, be that not a contraction for "Who is" ?
>
> The possesive shall be spelled "Whose", else beware the boxer of ears.
>
> Or might it be The Boxer of Ears?
> I heard that he he lives under a bridge somewhere.
> Likely, a troll bridge.
February 8, 2005 4:09:45 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Yep, I agree with all that, my reference to 'The Bill' was not to do with
rhyming slang - which I normally have no problem with, more so to do with
the speed at which they speak (or mumble) the odd dialect.
At 70 yrs.+, My brain probably doesn't absorb as fast any more :-)

Funnily, my wife was Dutch & I lived & worked there for 10 years, but never
had any reason to contemplate which 'brand' of English was taught at school
(incidently, English was completely banned during WW2 by the Germans,
naturally, which put all Dutch falling into that age/schooling group at a
disadavantage).
The only clue I've been able to pick up was that my son once correcting the
English teacher who pronounced 'suitcase' as "shoetcase" - (that's the
closest I can get to the teacher's pronunciation).

--

johnf

> John - understanding The Bill (allegedly, Cockney English?) The BBC did
> a course in Cockney rhyming slang, for "Eastenders", for the Americans.
> The trick is knowing phrase origins, since "rhyming" is often a
> misnomer in actual Cockney-speak.
> Examples - "going up the apples", originates from "apples and pears" =
> stairs (so translates to "going upstairs") "Me farmers are playing me
> up" - "farmers" = Farmer Giles, = piles (haemorrhoids, US hemorrhoids)
> so "my piles are painful" altho I prefer the idiomatic "playing me up",
> it's more emotive. (yeah, have probs!)
>
> A real quirk, constantly used - ".....pain in the 'arris".
> 'Arris = "Aristotle", rhyme for "bottle", shortened from "bottle and
> glass", so actual meaning, "pain in the arse" (US, ass). There's an
> English "North/South divide" with pronunciation.
>
> Spoken in the South, "glass" is pronounced "glarse". "butter" as
> "batter" ...I'm a Northerner living in the South. I take a bath, not a
> "barth". (hard a, as in "cat").
>
> Just be glad that you're not watching TV detective "Taggart". It's
> based in Glasgow, primarily Glaswegian actors. Trying to cope with the
> very thick accent AND Scots dialect words... it's another language.
> And, for utterly complete incomprehensibility - Geordie (Newcastle
> dialect)? GBH on the eardrums!
>
> Learning English, real problem is not vocabulary, but the spoken form.
> Germans and the French have great difficulty with "W" words (Germans
> make "we", "vee", the French, "zee") because the "We" vocal sound
> doesn't exist in their language. How much more difficult for non-Aryan
> races? Same problem in reverse for Brits learning other languages.
>
> All Scandinavia, Belgium and Holland are mainly multi-lingual. English
> as a second language is often taught from primary school. Belgium and
> Holland are routinely tri-lingual, which makes practical sense when you
> look at their geography. One Belgian co-worker I know was fluent in 6
> languages.
> Purest spoken English I ever heard was from groups of people (not one
> individual) from Sweden and Holland - flawless, fluent, not a trace of
> accent. The "Queen's English" (used to be BBC English) - defined as
> "English as spoken by the educated Southern gentleman".
>
> Regards, Len.
>
> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
> news:%23ipGlkPDFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with
>> which most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a
>> compulsory school course - but to what or who's standard??
>> Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
>> Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct
>> English, American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
>> but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in
>> "The Bill" :-)
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> johnf
>>
>>> Hi John,
>>>
>>> I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a
>>> public broadcast program within England about usage of computers being
>>> introduced into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews
>>> were with teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in
>>> kindengarden and middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years
>>> ago. They showed it on Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and
>>> stuff transcribed so the translaters could put up the subtitles or do
>>> the dubbing.
>>> Jeff
>>>
>>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>>> news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see
>>>> if we can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>> johnf
>>>>
>>>>> Hi David,
>>>>>
>>>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep
>>>>> lugging around, especially when moving to another country. I now
>>>>> use web based dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word
>>>>> searches. I don`t know if the online site I`m using is British
>>>>> English or American English. I know us Americans can easily
>>>>> slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London are
>>>>> slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>>>> was being spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to
>>>>> waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>>>>
>>>>> Jeff
>>>>>
>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>>>
>>>>> This is what MS says
>>>>>
>>>>> forum
>>>>>
>>>>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BO$(B,
>>>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>>>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>>>>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>>>>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>>>
>>>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>>>> the dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the contemporary
>>>>> changes
>>>>> in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the
>>>>> language and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>>>
>>>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>>>>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not
>>>>> common to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make
>>>>> no mention of any country specific notes. So both are correct in
>>>>> all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means
>>>>> gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno
>>>>> the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS +
>>>>> OL + INE) --
>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>>>> reading about his
>>>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition
>>>>>> of the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>>>> part of 35
>>>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"'
>>>>>> words are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to
>>>>>> mind.) Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a
>>>>>>> few letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>>>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to
>>>>>>>> service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night -
>>>>>>>> again..
>>>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR
>>>>>>>> used the word "benefited".
>>>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published
>>>>>>>> objective in compiling it was
>>>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed
>>>>>>>> to be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 4:09:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Shoetcase" - it's another, fairly recent, ill-educated Southern thing.
STUPID is now universally said as SHTUPID, and in fact applies to most words
beginning "ST (vowel)"
A similar (Southern) anomoly is that, almost without exception, most words
ending in "T" are now spoken with the final "t" missing.
I'm just a few years younger than you, NO advanced education after grammar
school, just a graduate of the university of life. I speak with a Northern
accent, modified by 40+ years living in/close to London. Despite that, I
occasionally use my 40-year-old French when on the Continent, was amazed to
be told that I spoke French in a pure French accent (pity my vocabulary is
so limited).

However, I had darn good English teachers (one English, the other Scottish,
both Oxford MA's) and a life-long passion for reading.

PS wouldn't dream of setting myself up as a custodian of the English
language, nor criticise incorrect grammar or usage in a "put-down" way. I
leave that to the bug, but I am pleased that her adversarial contributions
have ceased since she has been adequately and comprehensively squashed on
the point she set herself up as the final arbiter. "Fora" indeed!!

Sincerely, Len
"johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
news:%23lTYt6RDFHA.148@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Yep, I agree with all that, my reference to 'The Bill' was not to do with
> rhyming slang - which I normally have no problem with, more so to do with
> the speed at which they speak (or mumble) the odd dialect.
> At 70 yrs.+, My brain probably doesn't absorb as fast any more :-)
>
> Funnily, my wife was Dutch & I lived & worked there for 10 years, but
> never had any reason to contemplate which 'brand' of English was taught at
> school (incidently, English was completely banned during WW2 by the
> Germans, naturally, which put all Dutch falling into that age/schooling
> group at a disadavantage).
> The only clue I've been able to pick up was that my son once correcting
> the English teacher who pronounced 'suitcase' as "shoetcase" - (that's the
> closest I can get to the teacher's pronunciation).
>
> --
>
> johnf
>
>> John - understanding The Bill (allegedly, Cockney English?) The BBC did
>> a course in Cockney rhyming slang, for "Eastenders", for the Americans.
>> The trick is knowing phrase origins, since "rhyming" is often a
>> misnomer in actual Cockney-speak.
>> Examples - "going up the apples", originates from "apples and pears" =
>> stairs (so translates to "going upstairs") "Me farmers are playing me
>> up" - "farmers" = Farmer Giles, = piles (haemorrhoids, US hemorrhoids)
>> so "my piles are painful" altho I prefer the idiomatic "playing me up",
>> it's more emotive. (yeah, have probs!)
>>
>> A real quirk, constantly used - ".....pain in the 'arris".
>> 'Arris = "Aristotle", rhyme for "bottle", shortened from "bottle and
>> glass", so actual meaning, "pain in the arse" (US, ass). There's an
>> English "North/South divide" with pronunciation.
>>
>> Spoken in the South, "glass" is pronounced "glarse". "butter" as
>> "batter" ...I'm a Northerner living in the South. I take a bath, not a
>> "barth". (hard a, as in "cat").
>>
>> Just be glad that you're not watching TV detective "Taggart". It's
>> based in Glasgow, primarily Glaswegian actors. Trying to cope with the
>> very thick accent AND Scots dialect words... it's another language.
>> And, for utterly complete incomprehensibility - Geordie (Newcastle
>> dialect)? GBH on the eardrums!
>>
>> Learning English, real problem is not vocabulary, but the spoken form.
>> Germans and the French have great difficulty with "W" words (Germans
>> make "we", "vee", the French, "zee") because the "We" vocal sound
>> doesn't exist in their language. How much more difficult for non-Aryan
>> races? Same problem in reverse for Brits learning other languages.
>>
>> All Scandinavia, Belgium and Holland are mainly multi-lingual. English
>> as a second language is often taught from primary school. Belgium and
>> Holland are routinely tri-lingual, which makes practical sense when you
>> look at their geography. One Belgian co-worker I know was fluent in 6
>> languages.
>> Purest spoken English I ever heard was from groups of people (not one
>> individual) from Sweden and Holland - flawless, fluent, not a trace of
>> accent. The "Queen's English" (used to be BBC English) - defined as
>> "English as spoken by the educated Southern gentleman".
>>
>> Regards, Len.
>>
>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>> news:%23ipGlkPDFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>> What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with
>>> which most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a
>>> compulsory school course - but to what or who's standard??
>>> Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
>>> Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct
>>> English, American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
>>> but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in
>>> "The Bill" :-)
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>> johnf
>>>
>>>> Hi John,
>>>>
>>>> I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a
>>>> public broadcast program within England about usage of computers being
>>>> introduced into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews
>>>> were with teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in
>>>> kindengarden and middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years
>>>> ago. They showed it on Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and
>>>> stuff transcribed so the translaters could put up the subtitles or do
>>>> the dubbing.
>>>> Jeff
>>>>
>>>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>>>> news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see
>>>>> if we can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>> johnf
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hi David,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>>>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep
>>>>>> lugging around, especially when moving to another country. I now
>>>>>> use web based dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word
>>>>>> searches. I don`t know if the online site I`m using is British
>>>>>> English or American English. I know us Americans can easily
>>>>>> slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London are
>>>>>> slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>>>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>>>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>>>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>>>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>>>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>>>>> was being spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to
>>>>>> waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Jeff
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>>>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This is what MS says
>>>>>>
>>>>>> forum
>>>>>>
>>>>>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BO$(B,
>>>>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>>>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>>>>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>>>>>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>>>>>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>>>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>>>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>>>>> the dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the contemporary
>>>>>> changes
>>>>>> in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>>>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the
>>>>>> language and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>>>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>>>>>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not
>>>>>> common to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make
>>>>>> no mention of any country specific notes. So both are correct in
>>>>>> all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means
>>>>>> gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno
>>>>>> the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS +
>>>>>> OL + INE) --
>>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>>>>> reading about his
>>>>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>>>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition
>>>>>>> of the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>>>>> part of 35
>>>>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"'
>>>>>>> words are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to
>>>>>>> mind.) Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a
>>>>>>>> few letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>>>>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to
>>>>>>>>> service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night -
>>>>>>>>> again..
>>>>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR
>>>>>>>>> used the word "benefited".
>>>>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published
>>>>>>>>> objective in compiling it was
>>>>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed
>>>>>>>>> to be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>
>
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 1:48:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

There are 40,000,000 backpackers staying near me. Most are poms.

1. The english are ugly, americians are fat. German girls and Canadian girls are 50/50. That is they send us some dog ugly ones and some good looking ones.

But the pommie accent is grating to the ears.

French girls are music to the ears.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"jeffrey" <jeffrey@nospam.okinawa.com> wrote in message news:u3Y%23OqODFHA.3324@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Hi David,
>
> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to have a
> hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging around,
> especially when moving to another country. I now use web based dictionaries
> and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t know if the online
> site I`m using is British English or American English. I know us Americans
> can easily slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London are
> slaughtering the spoken language.
>
> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe some
> video images of interviews in London, and I being a native English speaker
> (used to different accents of English as well, British, Scottish, Indian,
> European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was being said out of the peoples
> mouths. I know we Americans sometimes have some strong accents when
> speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what was being spoken from these Brits was
> English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you
> for the insight.
>
> Jeff
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie
> thinks.
>
> This is what MS says
>
> forum
>
> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as opposed
> to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
> publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
> fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>
> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>
>
> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
> dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the
> language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition, careful
> attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of the
> 1990s are well served.
>
> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language: International
> Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the
> same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and
> americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific
> notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly
> British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol -
> dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL +
> INE)
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
>> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about
>> his
>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so, please
>> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
>> (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>
>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of
>> 35
>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
>> recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
>> interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
>> no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>
>> Thanks, Len
>>
>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>
>>> Will Denny
>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>
>>>
>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread "re
>>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>
>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>>> word "benefited".
>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>
>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>>> was
>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>
>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>
>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 1:48:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdenieg. The
phaonemneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aodccrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde
Uinervtisy, it dnsoe't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the
olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit
pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a
porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the hmuan mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by
istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Azmanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuoht
slpeling was ! ipmorantt
"David Candy" <.> wrote in message
news:ud9PV%23WDFHA.520@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
There are 40,000,000 backpackers staying near me. Most are poms.

1. The english are ugly, americians are fat. German girls and Canadian girls
are 50/50. That is they send us some dog ugly ones and some good looking
ones.

But the pommie accent is grating to the ears.

French girls are music to the ears.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"jeffrey" <jeffrey@nospam.okinawa.com> wrote in message
news:u3Y%23OqODFHA.3324@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Hi David,
>
> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to have a
> hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging around,
> especially when moving to another country. I now use web based
> dictionaries
> and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t know if the online
> site I`m using is British English or American English. I know us
> Americans
> can easily slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London
> are
> slaughtering the spoken language.
>
> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe some
> video images of interviews in London, and I being a native English speaker
> (used to different accents of English as well, British, Scottish, Indian,
> European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was being said out of the peoples
> mouths. I know we Americans sometimes have some strong accents when
> speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what was being spoken from these Brits
> was
> English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of your time, just wanted to thank
> you
> for the insight.
>
> Jeff
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie
> thinks.
>
> This is what MS says
>
> forum
>
> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
> opposed
> to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
> publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
> fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>
> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>
>
> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
> dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the
> language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition,
> careful
> attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of
> the
> 1990s are well served.
>
> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
> International
> Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the
> same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and
> americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific
> notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say
> Chiefly
> British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol -
> dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL
> +
> INE)
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
>> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about
>> his
>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>> please
>> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
>> (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>
>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of
>> 35
>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
>> recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
>> interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
>> no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>
>> Thanks, Len
>>
>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>
>>> Will Denny
>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>
>>>
>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread
>>>> "re
>>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>
>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>>> word "benefited".
>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>
>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>>> was
>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>
>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>
>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 1:51:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I remember one episode of the sweeney where armed robbers from glascow came to London. I was outraged it wasn't subtitled.

But as they say on the bill (before it turned into a soap), "sort it".

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message news:%23ipGlkPDFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with which
> most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a compulsory school
> course - but to what or who's standard??
> Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
> Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct English,
> American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
> but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in "The
> Bill" :-)
>
>
> --
>
> johnf
>
>> Hi John,
>>
>> I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a
>> public broadcast program within England about usage of computers being
>> introduced into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews
>> were with teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in
>> kindengarden and middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years
>> ago. They showed it on Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and
>> stuff transcribed so the translaters could put up the subtitles or do
>> the dubbing.
>> Jeff
>>
>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>> news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see
>>> if we can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>> johnf
>>>
>>>> Hi David,
>>>>
>>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging
>>>> around, especially when moving to another country. I now use web
>>>> based dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I
>>>> don`t know if the online site I`m using is British English or American
>>>> English. I know us Americans can easily slaughter a written language,
>>>> but I think the Brits in London are slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>>
>>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>>> was being spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to
>>>> waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>>>
>>>> Jeff
>>>>
>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>>
>>>> This is what MS says
>>>>
>>>> forum
>>>>
>>>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BŒ$(B,
>>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>>>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>>>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>>
>>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>>> the dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes
>>>> in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the language
>>>> and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>>
>>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>>>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common
>>>> to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention
>>>> of any country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries.
>>>> EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means gasoline (whatever
>>>> that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't
>>>> say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL + INE)
>>>> --
>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>>> reading about his
>>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of
>>>>> the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>>
>>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>>> part of 35
>>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words
>>>>> are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>>>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>>
>>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to
>>>>>>> service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night -
>>>>>>> again..
>>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used
>>>>>>> the word "benefited".
>>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published objective
>>>>>>> in compiling it was
>>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to
>>>>>>> be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>
>
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 2:42:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Rugby League was banned for kids by the vichy french. The law is still in effect and it is illegal to play RL in schools in France. The germans didn't have an opinion of RL vs RU.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message news:%23lTYt6RDFHA.148@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Yep, I agree with all that, my reference to 'The Bill' was not to do with
> rhyming slang - which I normally have no problem with, more so to do with
> the speed at which they speak (or mumble) the odd dialect.
> At 70 yrs.+, My brain probably doesn't absorb as fast any more :-)
>
> Funnily, my wife was Dutch & I lived & worked there for 10 years, but never
> had any reason to contemplate which 'brand' of English was taught at school
> (incidently, English was completely banned during WW2 by the Germans,
> naturally, which put all Dutch falling into that age/schooling group at a
> disadavantage).
> The only clue I've been able to pick up was that my son once correcting the
> English teacher who pronounced 'suitcase' as "shoetcase" - (that's the
> closest I can get to the teacher's pronunciation).
>
> --
>
> johnf
>
>> John - understanding The Bill (allegedly, Cockney English?) The BBC did
>> a course in Cockney rhyming slang, for "Eastenders", for the Americans.
>> The trick is knowing phrase origins, since "rhyming" is often a
>> misnomer in actual Cockney-speak.
>> Examples - "going up the apples", originates from "apples and pears" =
>> stairs (so translates to "going upstairs") "Me farmers are playing me
>> up" - "farmers" = Farmer Giles, = piles (haemorrhoids, US hemorrhoids)
>> so "my piles are painful" altho I prefer the idiomatic "playing me up",
>> it's more emotive. (yeah, have probs!)
>>
>> A real quirk, constantly used - ".....pain in the 'arris".
>> 'Arris = "Aristotle", rhyme for "bottle", shortened from "bottle and
>> glass", so actual meaning, "pain in the arse" (US, ass). There's an
>> English "North/South divide" with pronunciation.
>>
>> Spoken in the South, "glass" is pronounced "glarse". "butter" as
>> "batter" ...I'm a Northerner living in the South. I take a bath, not a
>> "barth". (hard a, as in "cat").
>>
>> Just be glad that you're not watching TV detective "Taggart". It's
>> based in Glasgow, primarily Glaswegian actors. Trying to cope with the
>> very thick accent AND Scots dialect words... it's another language.
>> And, for utterly complete incomprehensibility - Geordie (Newcastle
>> dialect)? GBH on the eardrums!
>>
>> Learning English, real problem is not vocabulary, but the spoken form.
>> Germans and the French have great difficulty with "W" words (Germans
>> make "we", "vee", the French, "zee") because the "We" vocal sound
>> doesn't exist in their language. How much more difficult for non-Aryan
>> races? Same problem in reverse for Brits learning other languages.
>>
>> All Scandinavia, Belgium and Holland are mainly multi-lingual. English
>> as a second language is often taught from primary school. Belgium and
>> Holland are routinely tri-lingual, which makes practical sense when you
>> look at their geography. One Belgian co-worker I know was fluent in 6
>> languages.
>> Purest spoken English I ever heard was from groups of people (not one
>> individual) from Sweden and Holland - flawless, fluent, not a trace of
>> accent. The "Queen's English" (used to be BBC English) - defined as
>> "English as spoken by the educated Southern gentleman".
>>
>> Regards, Len.
>>
>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>> news:%23ipGlkPDFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>> What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with
>>> which most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a
>>> compulsory school course - but to what or who's standard??
>>> Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
>>> Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct
>>> English, American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
>>> but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV in
>>> "The Bill" :-)
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>> johnf
>>>
>>>> Hi John,
>>>>
>>>> I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a
>>>> public broadcast program within England about usage of computers being
>>>> introduced into schools throughout London. Several of the interviews
>>>> were with teachers, parents and lots of students, especially those in
>>>> kindengarden and middleschool. This was about 4 to 4 and half years
>>>> ago. They showed it on Japanese TV, but needed all the interviews and
>>>> stuff transcribed so the translaters could put up the subtitles or do
>>>> the dubbing.
>>>> Jeff
>>>>
>>>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>>>> news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's see
>>>>> if we can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>> johnf
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hi David,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>>>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep
>>>>>> lugging around, especially when moving to another country. I now
>>>>>> use web based dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word
>>>>>> searches. I don`t know if the online site I`m using is British
>>>>>> English or American English. I know us Americans can easily
>>>>>> slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London are
>>>>>> slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>>>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>>>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>>>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>>>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>>>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>>>>> was being spoken from these Brits was English. Anyway, sorry to
>>>>>> waste more of your time, just wanted to thank you for the insight.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Jeff
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>>>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This is what MS says
>>>>>>
>>>>>> forum
>>>>>>
>>>>>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BO$(B,
>>>>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>>>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>>>>> opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public
>>>>>> concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for
>>>>>> debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>>>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>>>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>>>>> the dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the contemporary
>>>>>> changes
>>>>>> in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>>>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the
>>>>>> language and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>>>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975)
>>>>>> says pretty much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not
>>>>>> common to ALL english and americian speaking countries. They make
>>>>>> no mention of any country specific notes. So both are correct in
>>>>>> all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly British - means
>>>>>> gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol - dunno
>>>>>> the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS +
>>>>>> OL + INE) --
>>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>>>>> reading about his
>>>>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>>>>> please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition
>>>>>>> of the plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>>>>> part of 35
>>>>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"'
>>>>>>> words are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to
>>>>>>> mind.) Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a
>>>>>>>> few letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>>>>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to
>>>>>>>>> service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night -
>>>>>>>>> again..
>>>>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR
>>>>>>>>> used the word "benefited".
>>>>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published
>>>>>>>>> objective in compiling it was
>>>>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed
>>>>>>>>> to be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>
>
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 4:34:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

It's a little bit more than that. It's word shapes. Most illiterate people can read. But the biggest problem is they sub vocalise what they are reading slowing their reading speed down to the spoken word. This means that things fall out of short term memory before being transferred to long term memory.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Rick S." <nowhere@dot.com> wrote in message news:e2ftDUYDFHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdenieg. The
> phaonemneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aodccrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde
> Uinervtisy, it dnsoe't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the
> olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit
> pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a
> porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the hmuan mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by
> istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Azmanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuoht
> slpeling was ! ipmorantt
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:ud9PV%23WDFHA.520@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> There are 40,000,000 backpackers staying near me. Most are poms.
>
> 1. The english are ugly, americians are fat. German girls and Canadian girls
> are 50/50. That is they send us some dog ugly ones and some good looking
> ones.
>
> But the pommie accent is grating to the ears.
>
> French girls are music to the ears.
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "jeffrey" <jeffrey@nospam.okinawa.com> wrote in message
> news:u3Y%23OqODFHA.3324@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> Hi David,
>>
>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to have a
>> hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep lugging around,
>> especially when moving to another country. I now use web based
>> dictionaries
>> and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t know if the online
>> site I`m using is British English or American English. I know us
>> Americans
>> can easily slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London
>> are
>> slaughtering the spoken language.
>>
>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe some
>> video images of interviews in London, and I being a native English speaker
>> (used to different accents of English as well, British, Scottish, Indian,
>> European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was being said out of the peoples
>> mouths. I know we Americans sometimes have some strong accents when
>> speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what was being spoken from these Brits
>> was
>> English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of your time, just wanted to thank
>> you
>> for the insight.
>>
>> Jeff
>>
>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> http://www.uscricket.com
>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or Macquarrie
>> thinks.
>>
>> This is what MS says
>>
>> forum
>>
>> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>> opposed
>> to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
>> publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
>> fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>
>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>
>>
>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition, the
>> dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary changes in the
>> language and the requirements of its users. For the current edition,
>> careful
>> attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements of
>> the
>> 1990s are well served.
>>
>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>> International
>> Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty much the
>> same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL english and
>> americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any country specific
>> notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say
>> Chiefly
>> British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be petrol -
>> dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says it's GAS + OL
>> +
>> INE)
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> http://www.uscricket.com
>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like mine,
>>> general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was reading about
>>> his
>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>> please
>>> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the plural
>>> (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>
>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best part of
>>> 35
>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in very
>>> recent times that a few US and English spellings have become acceptably
>>> interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"' words are still a
>>> no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to mind.)
>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>
>>> Thanks, Len
>>>
>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Will Denny
>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb (thread
>>>>> "re
>>>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>>
>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR used the
>>>>> word "benefited".
>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>
>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well, English
>>>>> ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a non-American
>>>>> alternative, given his documented/published objective in compiling it
>>>>> was
>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed to be)
>>>>> superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>
>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>
>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
February 8, 2005 4:56:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

A completely irrelevent bit of info, but a true story -
At the local P.O. branch, the head person there was born in Holland during
the war.
His name-tag says "John", but as I can speak Dutch we often converse in his
native language.
He told me he was christened 'Johannes' so I was unsure whether to call him
by that name, or 'Jan', which is the normal abbreviation.
On asking him last week whether he was normally called Johannes or Jan
there, he told me - (quote) - "Everyone called me John, just to give the
Germans the shits"
Knowing the Dutch & their mentality after living there for quite a few
years, I can well believe it (& the subtlety behind it)


--

johnf

> Rugby League was banned for kids by the vichy french. The law is still
> in effect and it is illegal to play RL in schools in France. The
> germans didn't have an opinion of RL vs RU.
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
> news:%23lTYt6RDFHA.148@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Yep, I agree with all that, my reference to 'The Bill' was not to do
>> with rhyming slang - which I normally have no problem with, more so to
>> do with the speed at which they speak (or mumble) the odd dialect.
>> At 70 yrs.+, My brain probably doesn't absorb as fast any more :-)
>>
>> Funnily, my wife was Dutch & I lived & worked there for 10 years, but
>> never had any reason to contemplate which 'brand' of English was
>> taught at school (incidently, English was completely banned during WW2
>> by the Germans, naturally, which put all Dutch falling into that
>> age/schooling group at a disadavantage).
>> The only clue I've been able to pick up was that my son once
>> correcting the English teacher who pronounced 'suitcase' as
>> "shoetcase" - (that's the closest I can get to the teacher's
>> pronunciation).
>>
>> --
>>
>> johnf
>>
>>> John - understanding The Bill (allegedly, Cockney English?) The BBC
>>> did a course in Cockney rhyming slang, for "Eastenders", for the
>>> Americans. The trick is knowing phrase origins, since "rhyming" is
>>> often a misnomer in actual Cockney-speak.
>>> Examples - "going up the apples", originates from "apples and pears" =
>>> stairs (so translates to "going upstairs") "Me farmers are playing me
>>> up" - "farmers" = Farmer Giles, = piles (haemorrhoids, US hemorrhoids)
>>> so "my piles are painful" altho I prefer the idiomatic "playing me
>>> up", it's more emotive. (yeah, have probs!)
>>>
>>> A real quirk, constantly used - ".....pain in the 'arris".
>>> 'Arris = "Aristotle", rhyme for "bottle", shortened from "bottle and
>>> glass", so actual meaning, "pain in the arse" (US, ass). There's an
>>> English "North/South divide" with pronunciation.
>>>
>>> Spoken in the South, "glass" is pronounced "glarse". "butter" as
>>> "batter" ...I'm a Northerner living in the South. I take a bath, not
>>> a "barth". (hard a, as in "cat").
>>>
>>> Just be glad that you're not watching TV detective "Taggart". It's
>>> based in Glasgow, primarily Glaswegian actors. Trying to cope with the
>>> very thick accent AND Scots dialect words... it's another language.
>>> And, for utterly complete incomprehensibility - Geordie (Newcastle
>>> dialect)? GBH on the eardrums!
>>>
>>> Learning English, real problem is not vocabulary, but the spoken form.
>>> Germans and the French have great difficulty with "W" words (Germans
>>> make "we", "vee", the French, "zee") because the "We" vocal sound
>>> doesn't exist in their language. How much more difficult for non-Aryan
>>> races? Same problem in reverse for Brits learning other languages.
>>>
>>> All Scandinavia, Belgium and Holland are mainly multi-lingual. English
>>> as a second language is often taught from primary school. Belgium and
>>> Holland are routinely tri-lingual, which makes practical sense when
>>> you look at their geography. One Belgian co-worker I know was fluent
>>> in 6 languages.
>>> Purest spoken English I ever heard was from groups of people (not one
>>> individual) from Sweden and Holland - flawless, fluent, not a trace of
>>> accent. The "Queen's English" (used to be BBC English) - defined as
>>> "English as spoken by the educated Southern gentleman".
>>>
>>> Regards, Len.
>>>
>>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>>> news:%23ipGlkPDFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>>> What can I say? I wonder how the Japanese learn their English, with
>>>> which most non-rural people are now very fluent - probably as a
>>>> compulsory school course - but to what or who's standard??
>>>> Find that out & you'll probably have an answer,
>>>> Geez, I live in OZ, can converse or write in slanguage or correct
>>>> English, American, Canadian etc., understand 100% in any of those,
>>>> but sometimes get lost trying to follow some of the dialogues on TV
>>>> in "The Bill" :-)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>> johnf
>>>>
>>>>> Hi John,
>>>>>
>>>>> I wish I still had the AVI files that I had to transcribe. It was a
>>>>> public broadcast program within England about usage of computers
>>>>> being introduced into schools throughout London. Several of the
>>>>> interviews were with teachers, parents and lots of students,
>>>>> especially those in kindengarden and middleschool. This was about
>>>>> 4 to 4 and half years ago. They showed it on Japanese TV, but
>>>>> needed all the interviews and stuff transcribed so the translaters
>>>>> could put up the subtitles or do the dubbing.
>>>>> Jeff
>>>>>
>>>>> "johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message
>>>>> news:%23$hdnSPDFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> Sorry to butt in, but please post a few examples for fun & let's
>>>>>> see if we can sort this discrepancy out a bit.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>>
>>>>>> johnf
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hi David,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used
>>>>>>> to have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep
>>>>>>> lugging around, especially when moving to another country. I now
>>>>>>> use web based dictionaries and noticed how each reacts to word
>>>>>>> searches. I don`t know if the online site I`m using is British
>>>>>>> English or American English. I know us Americans can easily
>>>>>>> slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in London are
>>>>>>> slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>>>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>>>>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>>>>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>>>>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what
>>>>>>> was being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans
>>>>>>> sometimes have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t
>>>>>>> beleive what was being spoken from these Brits was English.
>>>>>>> Anyway, sorry to waste more of your time, just wanted to thank
>>>>>>> you for the insight.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Jeff
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>>>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>>>>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> This is what MS says
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> forum
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> forum fo$B!V(Brem or f$BO$(B,
>>>>>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where
>>>>>>> public business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts
>>>>>>> of law as opposed to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss
>>>>>>> topics of public concern; a publication, regular meeting, etc
>>>>>>> serving as a medium for debate: fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>>>>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>>>>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding
>>>>>>> edition, the dictionary$BCT(B editors have kept abreast of the
>>>>>>> contemporary changes
>>>>>>> in the language and the requirements of its users. For the current
>>>>>>> edition, careful attention has been taken to ensure that the
>>>>>>> language and requirements of the 1990s are well served.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>>>>>> International Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing
>>>>>>> Company:1975) says pretty much the same as MS. They note where
>>>>>>> usuage is not common to ALL english and americian speaking
>>>>>>> countries. They make no mention of any country specific notes. So
>>>>>>> both are correct in all countries. EG for Petrol that say Chiefly
>>>>>>> British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be
>>>>>>> petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it
>>>>>>> says it's GAS + OL + INE) --
>>>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>>>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge,
>>>>>>>> like mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I
>>>>>>>> was reading about his
>>>>>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If
>>>>>>>> so, please look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS
>>>>>>>> spelling/definition of the plural (i.e whether he has both
>>>>>>>> forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>>>>>> part of 35
>>>>>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only
>>>>>>>> in very recent times that a few US and English spellings have
>>>>>>>> become acceptably interchangeable in written English (but
>>>>>>>> missing "u"' words are still a no-no - "benefitted", in
>>>>>>>> particular, springs to mind.) Just noticed is 03.45 - time for
>>>>>>>> bed! .
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>>>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a
>>>>>>>>> few letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>>>>>> (thread "re CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need
>>>>>>>>>> to service my keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at
>>>>>>>>>> night - again..
>>>>>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR
>>>>>>>>>> used the word "benefited".
>>>>>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is
>>>>>>>>>> "benefitted".
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published
>>>>>>>>>> objective in compiling it was
>>>>>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he
>>>>>>>>>> deemed to be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added
>>>>>>>>>> one!
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my
>>>>>>>>>> part).
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
February 8, 2005 5:09:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sorry, David, but I must agree with you on both posts.
As for Rick S's "comment", everyone knew (so I thought) that any word
starting and ending with the original letter is readable - irrespective as
to how you jumble the contents, so I can't see the point of that post - am I
missing something?

--

johnf

> It's a little bit more than that. It's word shapes. Most illiterate
> people can read. But the biggest problem is they sub vocalise what they
> are reading slowing their reading speed down to the spoken word. This
> means that things fall out of short term memory before being
> transferred to long term memory.
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> http://www.uscricket.com
> "Rick S." <nowhere@dot.com> wrote in message
> news:e2ftDUYDFHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdenieg.
>> The phaonemneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aodccrnig to a rscheearch at
>> Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dnsoe't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in
>> a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat
>> ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you
>> can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the hmuan mnid
>> deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
>> Azmanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuoht slpeling was ! ipmorantt
>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>> news:ud9PV%23WDFHA.520@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> There are 40,000,000 backpackers staying near me. Most are poms.
>>
>> 1. The english are ugly, americians are fat. German girls and Canadian
>> girls are 50/50. That is they send us some dog ugly ones and some good
>> looking ones.
>>
>> But the pommie accent is grating to the ears.
>>
>> French girls are music to the ears.
>>
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> http://www.uscricket.com
>> "jeffrey" <jeffrey@nospam.okinawa.com> wrote in message
>> news:u3Y%23OqODFHA.3324@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>> Hi David,
>>>
>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep
>>> lugging around, especially when moving to another country. I now use
>>> web based dictionaries
>>> and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t know if the
>>> online site I`m using is British English or American English. I know
>>> us Americans
>>> can easily slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in
>>> London are
>>> slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>
>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>> was being spoken from these Brits was
>>> English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of your time, just wanted to
>>> thank you
>>> for the insight.
>>>
>>> Jeff
>>>
>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>
>>> This is what MS says
>>>
>>> forum
>>>
>>> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>> opposed
>>> to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
>>> publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
>>> fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>
>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>
>>>
>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>> the dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary
>>> changes in the language and the requirements of its users. For the
>>> current edition, careful
>>> attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements
>>> of the
>>> 1990s are well served.
>>>
>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>> International
>>> Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty
>>> much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL
>>> english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any
>>> country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for
>>> Petrol that say Chiefly
>>> British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be
>>> petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says
>>> it's GAS + OL +
>>> INE)
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>> reading about his
>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>> please
>>>> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the
>>>> plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>
>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>> part of 35
>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"'
>>>> words are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to
>>>> mind.)
>>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>
>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>
>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>> (thread "re
>>>>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR
>>>>>> used the word "benefited".
>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published objective
>>>>>> in compiling it was
>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed
>>>>>> to be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 7:33:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I don't know why I put two seperate topics in the same paragraph.

It's word shapes. The people that do what Rick tried also get humps and bumps right along the whole length of the word. But rick, of course, get 80% of the way there with the 1st/nth means. If done well it takes a few words to notice it's gibberish. Although I read bizzare things into most public signs. And have to reread closely because as I get older word shapes are ALL I see.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"johnf" <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote in message news:eRt9JuYDFHA.272@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Sorry, David, but I must agree with you on both posts.
> As for Rick S's "comment", everyone knew (so I thought) that any word
> starting and ending with the original letter is readable - irrespective as
> to how you jumble the contents, so I can't see the point of that post - am I
> missing something?
>
> --
>
> johnf
>
>> It's a little bit more than that. It's word shapes. Most illiterate
>> people can read. But the biggest problem is they sub vocalise what they
>> are reading slowing their reading speed down to the spoken word. This
>> means that things fall out of short term memory before being
>> transferred to long term memory.
>>
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> http://www.uscricket.com
>> "Rick S." <nowhere@dot.com> wrote in message
>> news:e2ftDUYDFHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>>I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdenieg.
>>> The phaonemneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aodccrnig to a rscheearch at
>>> Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dnsoe't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in
>>> a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat
>>> ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you
>>> can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the hmuan mnid
>>> deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
>>> Azmanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuoht slpeling was ! ipmorantt
>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>> news:ud9PV%23WDFHA.520@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>>> There are 40,000,000 backpackers staying near me. Most are poms.
>>>
>>> 1. The english are ugly, americians are fat. German girls and Canadian
>>> girls are 50/50. That is they send us some dog ugly ones and some good
>>> looking ones.
>>>
>>> But the pommie accent is grating to the ears.
>>>
>>> French girls are music to the ears.
>>>
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>> "jeffrey" <jeffrey@nospam.okinawa.com> wrote in message
>>> news:u3Y%23OqODFHA.3324@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>> Hi David,
>>>>
>>>> Interesting insights you provided with your information. I used to
>>>> have a hard copy dictionary around, but it was too big to keep
>>>> lugging around, especially when moving to another country. I now use
>>>> web based dictionaries
>>>> and noticed how each reacts to word searches. I don`t know if the
>>>> online site I`m using is British English or American English. I know
>>>> us Americans
>>>> can easily slaughter a written language, but I think the Brits in
>>>> London are
>>>> slaughtering the spoken language.
>>>>
>>>> I did some transcribing work for a little while, had to transcribe
>>>> some video images of interviews in London, and I being a native
>>>> English speaker (used to different accents of English as well,
>>>> British, Scottish, Indian, European, etc) couldn`t beleive what was
>>>> being said out of the peoples mouths. I know we Americans sometimes
>>>> have some strong accents when speaking, but I couldn`t beleive what
>>>> was being spoken from these Brits was
>>>> English. Anyway, sorry to waste more of your time, just wanted to
>>>> thank you
>>>> for the insight.
>>>>
>>>> Jeff
>>>>
>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>> news:o hHRhzoCFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>> PS That MS UK dictionary which is what Australians get.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>>>> news:%23nHw6voCFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>> This is a MS newsgroup. Who gives a F what webster, oxford, or
>>>> Macquarrie thinks.
>>>>
>>>> This is what MS says
>>>>
>>>> forum
>>>>
>>>> forum fo¢rem or fö¢,
>>>> noun originally a market-place, especially that in Rome where public
>>>> business was transacted and justice dispensed; the courts of law as
>>>> opposed
>>>> to Parliament (rare); a meeting to discuss topics of public concern; a
>>>> publication, regular meeting, etc serving as a medium for debate:
>>>> fo'rums or fo'ra plural.
>>>> [Latin forum, related to foras out of doors]
>>>>
>>>> (c) Larousse plc. All rights reserved
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> MS uses The Chambers Dictionary is the product of a long line of
>>>> dictionary-making. With the publication of each succeeding edition,
>>>> the dictionary’s editors have kept abreast of the contemporary
>>>> changes in the language and the requirements of its users. For the
>>>> current edition, careful
>>>> attention has been taken to ensure that the language and requirements
>>>> of the
>>>> 1990s are well served.
>>>>
>>>> The Hertigage Illustrated Dictionary of the English Language:
>>>> International
>>>> Edition (Americian Hertigage Publishing Company:1975) says pretty
>>>> much the same as MS. They note where usuage is not common to ALL
>>>> english and americian speaking countries. They make no mention of any
>>>> country specific notes. So both are correct in all countries. EG for
>>>> Petrol that say Chiefly
>>>> British - means gasoline (whatever that is - I suppose it must be
>>>> petrol - dunno the dictionary doesn't say gasoline is petrol, it says
>>>> it's GAS + OL +
>>>> INE)
>>>> --
>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>>> http://www.uscricket.com
>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:BdCMd.695$RF4.624@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>>>>> Will, do you actually HAVE a Webster's, or is your knowledge, like
>>>>> mine, general knowledge? (I know a bit about Webster 'cos I was
>>>>> reading about his
>>>>> work a while ago. I enjoy words, and tracing their origins). If so,
>>>>> please
>>>>> look up "Forum" - I'd like to know HIS spelling/definition of the
>>>>> plural (i.e whether he has both forms) - it's bugging me!
>>>>>
>>>>> As you know I'm a Brit, but worked for US multinationals for best
>>>>> part of 35
>>>>> years. It plays havoc, occasionally, with my spelling. It's only in
>>>>> very recent times that a few US and English spellings have become
>>>>> acceptably interchangeable in written English (but missing "u"'
>>>>> words are still a no-no - "benefitted", in particular, springs to
>>>>> mind.)
>>>>> Just noticed is 03.45 - time for bed! .
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks, Len
>>>>>
>>>>> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
>>>>> news:o rHRdemCFHA.3348@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> Curious - as you say. As a norm Webster seems to have omitted a few
>>>>>> letters along the way - including a lot of 'u's!!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Will Denny
>>>>>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>>>>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Yabbadoo" <lsdolby@ignore.ntlwor.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:b3AMd.1057$SC2.113@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
>>>>>>> Before you leap on it, there's another typo in my post 4 Feb
>>>>>>> (thread "re
>>>>>>> CalcPlus") - missed the "r" in "comfortable". Need to service my
>>>>>>> keyboard, keys getting sticky, also late at night - again..
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Plus - you might note that, in the post I was replying to, BAR
>>>>>>> used the word "benefited".
>>>>>>> That's the English spelling. American spelling is "benefitted".
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Aren't dictionaries wonderful sources of information? (well,
>>>>>>> English ones, anyway). Unlikely that Webster would give a
>>>>>>> non-American alternative, given his documented/published objective
>>>>>>> in compiling it was
>>>>>>> to "simplify" English for an exclusively American readership##.
>>>>>>> Curiously, many of his "simplifications" removed (what he deemed
>>>>>>> to be) superfluous letters - in "benefitted" he added one!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> ##( I don't possess a Webster's, this is conjecture on my part).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Apols for typo. Len.
>
>
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