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Water Cooling Loop

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January 14, 2007 3:41:37 AM

Hey guys,

i just wanted to know a good loop (sequence) of a liquid cooling loop to cool my cpu and graphics card. thanks a lot

More about : water cooling loop

January 14, 2007 11:17:03 AM

Well it depends on what all equipment and hardware you have.

CPU? what graphics cards? do you have a reservoir? etc.

As a general rule i'd suggest Reservoir>Pump>Radiator>CPU>GPU>Reservoir

at the bare minimum you need to have Resevoir>pump to start out the loop, and it would be best (IMHO) to hit the radiator before the loop hits any of your components.

It's best to have CPU>GPU because the GPU's run hotter than the CPU and this way you won't have hot water running directly into the CPU.

Hope this helps.
January 16, 2007 5:55:31 PM

the loop is fine as recommended but you don't need the reservoir if you don't want, just add a T to the line right before the pump and run some tubing up to a fill port.
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January 16, 2007 6:18:55 PM

IMHO, I think the jury is still out as to whether life is easier with or without a reservoir. I've run my systems both ways, and while it is nice to have one less part to worry about, bleeding the air using a T-line is a real pain that takes hours, and can involve rocking your system back and forth to try and get all the air bubbles out..

I think it has to be personal preference here. Reservoirs make it easier to fill and bleed your loop, as well as topping off your fluid when it gets low, while a T-line has fewer parts and less fluid in the loop.
January 16, 2007 10:12:07 PM

also, could someone explain a push/pull system that i hear people talking about. thx
January 17, 2007 2:27:27 AM

Push/pull has to do with the radiator, where you have one fan (or set of fans) on one side pushing air through the radiator and another fan (or set of fans) pulling air through on the other side. It is one way to assure that as much cool air gets to the surface area of the radiator fins as is possible. To eliminate dead space around the cone of the fan (where the motor is), you can use a radiator shroud to space the fan 1-2 inches away from the radiator. This is most effective when used as an external radiator.

The push/pull designation comes from several airplane designs (old and modern) that used two engines in the front and rear of the aircraft to push/pull the air over the aircraft.
January 17, 2007 10:06:38 AM

yea i hear people talking about some kind of 6-fan push/pull system? is that a good exterior setup? i want to have dual fans not a tri-fan setup. thanks
January 17, 2007 11:12:12 AM

Okay assuming you have an average cpu and graphics card with no overclocking settings. That would be from reservoir tank or T-split reservoir, then it goes to the pump and to the cpu, exiting out and going to the graphics card block, then goes to the radiator, then cool water comes back to the reservoir and repeats the cycle.

Or you can split the tube from the pump towards both cpu and gpu at the same time. This lowers the flow rate on the blocks but gives equal cool water and may have better cooling than the single loop I mentioned above.

For the radiator you can have fans on both side and facing the same direction. One fan is pushing air in to the radiator fins and the other is sucking it out.This achieves higher air flow inside the fins and do so with low to medium rpm fan thus operating silently. This is called the "push-pull fan setup".
January 17, 2007 11:21:00 AM

Quote:
yea i hear people talking about some kind of 6-fan push/pull system? is that a good exterior setup? i want to have dual fans not a tri-fan setup. thanks


Notice my triple 120mm radiator is sporting 6 fans for push-pull effect.

This are low rpm fans and runs quite. I used to have 6 FM121s but I sold that to my buddies and used this cheap 120mm fans from my old cases and still do a damn good job cooling the rads.





Anyways this loop is only cooling my Pentium D 840 oc to 4Ghz @ 1.55v.
January 18, 2007 3:14:21 AM

You're quite right about what is better, I personally use a reservoir but can see the advantages to not having one.

OP: whether you have push pull depends on how much space you want to take up and whether you want to go internal or external with your water cooling... mines all internal and my gpu temps (SLI) still dropped from 80C at load to 40C at load on one loop with a 120.2 rad with 4 fans in push/pull.
January 18, 2007 6:32:00 AM

January 18, 2007 7:06:55 AM

Damn your one of the 5 winners of the Corsair Dominator Gold Edition rams!!!!!!!!!!! Oh man, that rams are so bling blingin' in your case. :D 

Correct me if I'm wrong but you are Wun Keat Ding from Down Under.

Oh by the way are those two individual loops sharing one reservoir? One for cpu and one for graphics card, right? In your case I would just use triple rad and splits off to cpu and graphics card, that way less components. But your rig is bad ass nonetheless. Those RaptorX looks cool as well.
January 18, 2007 7:17:15 AM

Yep im one of only 5 people with gold plated 8888s



Yep Wun Ding aka wun911

The res I made and holds 5 Litres

The case is a MM U2 UFO

Raptors in RAID

I dual loop and water cool everything that is hot.
January 18, 2007 7:21:03 AM

You should Ebay that man, I'm sure someone will pay big bucks for it. :D 
January 18, 2007 7:24:58 AM

Im having too much fun with them. They are insanly fast, really responsive. And I have a rig that can exploit the preformance out of them.

I used to have 8500s but these 8888s are in a league of their own!
January 18, 2007 7:30:22 AM

Cool! You know what I won? I got an XXXL T-shirt from Nvidia!!! :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 

I won the Rig Of The Month, of June 2006!! :D  :D  :D 

I called them up for a small size T-Shirt replacement, but they said they only have XXXL size. :evil:  :evil:  :evil:  I guess a very fat person more likely to win, so they have only extra huge T-shirts! 8O 8O 8O

A T-Shirt!!!!!, can you believe that!!! :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
!