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May 3, 2004 1:42:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have a TV that is 20 years old and the tuner (or filter) is finally
going out on it. It is a Mitsubishi rear projection that I had great
luck with. Unfortunately, the picture keeps shutting off and it looks
like there are no parts for the TV anymore, I need to start looking
for a new TV. To round out my equipment, I have Dishnetwork, a DVD
player (non-progressive scan) and a Marantz SR870 (from 1996)
receiver.

I went over to Fry's electronics and looked at several TVs and one the
sales person mentioned was a Mitsubishi WS-55613. It looked great,
but is it a good TV? I know after I get the TV, I will need to
upgrade the DVD to a progressive scan model to get a better picture
and I will probably break down and purchase a new receiver (one that
handles component video). Again, the salesperson suggested an Onkyo
TX-SR801.

I just don't know where to begin to find out if the equipment talked
about is really worth the price, or just the salesman hyping it up?
Where does one start?

Can anyone give me any suggestions?

Thanks for your help.

More about : start

Anonymous
May 3, 2004 9:12:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> I just don't know where to begin to find out if the equipment talked
> about is really worth the price, or just the salesman hyping it up?
> Where does one start?
>
> Can anyone give me any suggestions?

What I did was looked at several TVs at my local stores, played with
the remotes and settings, tried to get similar brightness/contrast
levels when comparing them next to each other so I could determine
which I thought had the best picture. After I jotted down the model
numbers, I went on sites such as eopinions.com to see what others said
about those particular models.

After I whittled it down to a couple of models, I went back and took
another look, played a while longer with them. Noted any details
which might put one model above another, such as number of inputs,
viewing angle, how easy the TV is to move around, remote control
features, etc. Little things.

Finally got it down to one model, and searched the internet for the
best price. Save boatloads over my local stores.
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 3:05:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 2 May 2004 21:42:46 -0700, chip33az@netscape.net (Chip) wrote:

>I have a TV that is 20 years old and the tuner (or filter) is finally
>going out on it. It is a Mitsubishi rear projection that I had great

You need just a tuner??
Then I suggest getting just a (H)DTV receiver component for now.
Virtually all of (H)DTV receivers can output a down converted NTSC
S-video signal.

Look around.. hunt for it.. wait for a sale..
Ask about (H)DTV tuners each time you're in a store.

Last year, I picked up a Zenith HDV-420 for $198 !!!

>luck with. Unfortunately, the picture keeps shutting off and it looks
>like there are no parts for the TV anymore, I need to start looking
>for a new TV. To round out my equipment, I have Dishnetwork, a DVD
>player (non-progressive scan) and a Marantz SR870 (from 1996)
>receiver.
>
>I went over to Fry's electronics and looked at several TVs and one the
>sales person mentioned was a Mitsubishi WS-55613. It looked great,
>but is it a good TV? I know after I get the TV, I will need to
>upgrade the DVD to a progressive scan model to get a better picture
>and I will probably break down and purchase a new receiver (one that
>handles component video). Again, the salesperson suggested an Onkyo
>TX-SR801.
^^^^^^^^^^^
Overpriced... 900 to 1K$.. save your money !!!!

Most people will find that a Onkyo TX-SR501 (250 to 300$) will do
the job. The 501 has enough built in video switching capability to
satisfy most users.

>
>I just don't know where to begin to find out if the equipment talked
>about is really worth the price, or just the salesman hyping it up?
>Where does one start?
>
>Can anyone give me any suggestions?

see above... start on the low end.. remove the immediate need..
then plan your upgrades and wait for the bargains.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 8:57:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Chip,

You had good luck with your last Mitsubishi so it sounds like you have
brand loyalty to Mitsubishi. I'm happy to tell you they still make
great rear-projection HDTVs and they are still a leader in
rear-projection technology (along with Pioneer and Hitachi), but not
every set they produce is quality compared to what's available these
days.

So what's changed in the last twenty years and how does WS-55613
compare? Well the model you're looking at is part of the Mitsubishi
GoldPlus series. To help classify the quality of their product
offering, today Mitsubishi classifies their HDTVs in one of five
categories: Gold, GoldPlus, Platinum, Diamond and Alpha. The
differences in these classes is pretty large, think of the Gold series
as a striped down Toyota Corolla and the Alpha series as a high end
Lexus. The picture quality (based on magnification/lens technology) is
what you should be concerned with and their is a visible difference
between the Gold, GoldPlus and then Plantinum, Diamond and Alpha
lines. I would recommend going with Mitsubishi's Platinum or Diamond
series and nothing less (especially if you intend to keep the TV for
twenty years or so :) .

If Fry's doesn't carry the higher-end lines (I doubt they do) go to a
more speciality store (you can find a retailer at Mitsubishi's
website).

Other really strong brands are: Pioneer (Elite series) and my
favorite, Hitachi (S series and W series) to a lesser degree Sony is a
safe (albeit over priced) choice.

Good places to shop depend on your area. Sears carries Hitachi,
Tweater carries Mitsubishi and Pioneer. Conns also has a good
selection (Hitachi and Mitsubishi) and they have reasonably good
service. Both retailers mentioned offer price matching.

Best of luck.

-Jeremy
--------------------------------------------
New to HDTV, check out my HDTV Buyers FAQ
http://hdtv.0catch.com
--------------------------------------------









chip33az@netscape.net (Chip) wrote in message news:<fac293f3.0405022042.59402e58@posting.google.com>...
> I have a TV that is 20 years old and the tuner (or filter) is finally
> going out on it. It is a Mitsubishi rear projection that I had great
> luck with. Unfortunately, the picture keeps shutting off and it looks
> like there are no parts for the TV anymore, I need to start looking
> for a new TV. To round out my equipment, I have Dishnetwork, a DVD
> player (non-progressive scan) and a Marantz SR870 (from 1996)
> receiver.
>
> I went over to Fry's electronics and looked at several TVs and one the
> sales person mentioned was a Mitsubishi WS-55613. It looked great,
> but is it a good TV? I know after I get the TV, I will need to
> upgrade the DVD to a progressive scan model to get a better picture
> and I will probably break down and purchase a new receiver (one that
> handles component video). Again, the salesperson suggested an Onkyo
> TX-SR801.
>
> I just don't know where to begin to find out if the equipment talked
> about is really worth the price, or just the salesman hyping it up?
> Where does one start?
>
> Can anyone give me any suggestions?
>
> Thanks for your help.
May 3, 2004 11:17:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I don't think I could just get an HDTV receiver component to replace
what is failing in my TV. I lose the picture itself using any inputs
(TV, VCR, DVD, etc). What does the displaying of the actual picture
is not working.

Thanks for the good advice though.

Tim Keating <NotForJunkEmail@directinternet11.com1> wrote in message news:<2omc909buo6rmuch8s3o6g35t6les1b833@4ax.com>...
> On 2 May 2004 21:42:46 -0700, chip33az@netscape.net (Chip) wrote:
>
> >I have a TV that is 20 years old and the tuner (or filter) is finally
> >going out on it. It is a Mitsubishi rear projection that I had great
>
> You need just a tuner??
> Then I suggest getting just a (H)DTV receiver component for now.
> Virtually all of (H)DTV receivers can output a down converted NTSC
> S-video signal.
>
> Look around.. hunt for it.. wait for a sale..
> Ask about (H)DTV tuners each time you're in a store.
>
> Last year, I picked up a Zenith HDV-420 for $198 !!!
>
> >luck with. Unfortunately, the picture keeps shutting off and it looks
> >like there are no parts for the TV anymore, I need to start looking
> >for a new TV. To round out my equipment, I have Dishnetwork, a DVD
> >player (non-progressive scan) and a Marantz SR870 (from 1996)
> >receiver.
> >
> >I went over to Fry's electronics and looked at several TVs and one the
> >sales person mentioned was a Mitsubishi WS-55613. It looked great,
> >but is it a good TV? I know after I get the TV, I will need to
> >upgrade the DVD to a progressive scan model to get a better picture
> >and I will probably break down and purchase a new receiver (one that
> >handles component video). Again, the salesperson suggested an Onkyo
> >TX-SR801.
> ^^^^^^^^^^^
> Overpriced... 900 to 1K$.. save your money !!!!
>
> Most people will find that a Onkyo TX-SR501 (250 to 300$) will do
> the job. The 501 has enough built in video switching capability to
> satisfy most users.
>
> >
> >I just don't know where to begin to find out if the equipment talked
> >about is really worth the price, or just the salesman hyping it up?
> >Where does one start?
> >
> >Can anyone give me any suggestions?
>
> see above... start on the low end.. remove the immediate need..
> then plan your upgrades and wait for the bargains.
May 4, 2004 10:29:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks for the information.

Yes, I was leaning towards Mitsubishi since the first TV had such a
good track life. I realize that nothing is built like they used to
be, but am hoping that it is still well built.

I haven't heard of any of the stores you mentioned, but Ultimate
Electronics offer the whole Mitsubishi line as well as some of the
others you mentioned.

I would be too nervous buying this over the Internet even with a price
discount. Buying small things don't bother me, but something like
this does.

Again, thanks for the information.

jeremy@pdq.net (JDeats) wrote in message news:<b0738dc6.0405031557.58c2c142@posting.google.com>...
> Chip,
>
> You had good luck with your last Mitsubishi so it sounds like you have
> brand loyalty to Mitsubishi. I'm happy to tell you they still make
> great rear-projection HDTVs and they are still a leader in
> rear-projection technology (along with Pioneer and Hitachi), but not
> every set they produce is quality compared to what's available these
> days.
>
> So what's changed in the last twenty years and how does WS-55613
> compare? Well the model you're looking at is part of the Mitsubishi
> GoldPlus series. To help classify the quality of their product
> offering, today Mitsubishi classifies their HDTVs in one of five
> categories: Gold, GoldPlus, Platinum, Diamond and Alpha. The
> differences in these classes is pretty large, think of the Gold series
> as a striped down Toyota Corolla and the Alpha series as a high end
> Lexus. The picture quality (based on magnification/lens technology) is
> what you should be concerned with and their is a visible difference
> between the Gold, GoldPlus and then Plantinum, Diamond and Alpha
> lines. I would recommend going with Mitsubishi's Platinum or Diamond
> series and nothing less (especially if you intend to keep the TV for
> twenty years or so :) .
>
> If Fry's doesn't carry the higher-end lines (I doubt they do) go to a
> more speciality store (you can find a retailer at Mitsubishi's
> website).
>
> Other really strong brands are: Pioneer (Elite series) and my
> favorite, Hitachi (S series and W series) to a lesser degree Sony is a
> safe (albeit over priced) choice.
>
> Good places to shop depend on your area. Sears carries Hitachi,
> Tweater carries Mitsubishi and Pioneer. Conns also has a good
> selection (Hitachi and Mitsubishi) and they have reasonably good
> service. Both retailers mentioned offer price matching.
>
> Best of luck.
>
> -Jeremy
> --------------------------------------------
> New to HDTV, check out my HDTV Buyers FAQ
> http://hdtv.0catch.com
> --------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 4, 2004 11:30:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Here are a few other things:

- I recommend a 16:9 (widescreen set), lots of reasons why. Namely
because HD content is always widescreen and will fill-out the set.
If you enjoy movies at all, here's a good article that's covers the
topic of aspect ratios pretty well:
www.thedigitalbits.com/articles/anamorphic/aspectratios...

- Other makers over auto focus feature, you've probably gotten acustom
to manually focusing your set. I don't know what you've old set had,
but current Mitsubishi's offer a lot of percision (90-point
convergence tweaking), auto convergence/focus saves you soem time by
getting you in ballbark. I don't know why Mitsubishi doesn't offer
this.

- Some manufactuers (namely: Sony, LG and Hitachi) include 1080i
upconverters in some of their models, this makes normal non-HD
programming look much better than it otherwise would.

- There's been quite a few advancements in TV technology, aside from
CRT rear-projection sets (all Mitsubishi's rear-projection sets are
CRT) we now have DLP technology which has some benefits in that it
will not wear out and it will never have burn-in on the screen. Look
at Samsung and Panasonic sets if you're interested in DLP they have
the best offering for this technology right now. You also have LCD
technology, LCOS, and Plasma (I'd stay away from the last two). In the
right conditions and the right technology inside, Rear-projection is
still considered to produce the best picture quality available, but a
lot of things haven't changed about this technology: the sets are
still bulky and heavy, almost all of them are CRT based and still burn
phospher to produce an image (so they are highly subject to burn-in
and have about 15-20 year life span), they still have a limited
viewing angle and will dim when you get outside of their viewing
angle.


Hope this was helpful.
-Jeremy





chip33az@netscape.net (Chip) wrote in message news:<fac293f3.0405040529.2d75d00a@posting.google.com>...
> Thanks for the information.
>
> Yes, I was leaning towards Mitsubishi since the first TV had such a
> good track life. I realize that nothing is built like they used to
> be, but am hoping that it is still well built.
>
> I haven't heard of any of the stores you mentioned, but Ultimate
> Electronics offer the whole Mitsubishi line as well as some of the
> others you mentioned.
>
> I would be too nervous buying this over the Internet even with a price
> discount. Buying small things don't bother me, but something like
> this does.
>
> Again, thanks for the information.
>
> jeremy@pdq.net (JDeats) wrote in message news:<b0738dc6.0405031557.58c2c142@posting.google.com>...
> > Chip,
> >
> > You had good luck with your last Mitsubishi so it sounds like you have
> > brand loyalty to Mitsubishi. I'm happy to tell you they still make
> > great rear-projection HDTVs and they are still a leader in
> > rear-projection technology (along with Pioneer and Hitachi), but not
> > every set they produce is quality compared to what's available these
> > days.
> >
> > So what's changed in the last twenty years and how does WS-55613
> > compare? Well the model you're looking at is part of the Mitsubishi
> > GoldPlus series. To help classify the quality of their product
> > offering, today Mitsubishi classifies their HDTVs in one of five
> > categories: Gold, GoldPlus, Platinum, Diamond and Alpha. The
> > differences in these classes is pretty large, think of the Gold series
> > as a striped down Toyota Corolla and the Alpha series as a high end
> > Lexus. The picture quality (based on magnification/lens technology) is
> > what you should be concerned with and their is a visible difference
> > between the Gold, GoldPlus and then Plantinum, Diamond and Alpha
> > lines. I would recommend going with Mitsubishi's Platinum or Diamond
> > series and nothing less (especially if you intend to keep the TV for
> > twenty years or so :) .
> >
> > If Fry's doesn't carry the higher-end lines (I doubt they do) go to a
> > more speciality store (you can find a retailer at Mitsubishi's
> > website).
> >
> > Other really strong brands are: Pioneer (Elite series) and my
> > favorite, Hitachi (S series and W series) to a lesser degree Sony is a
> > safe (albeit over priced) choice.
> >
> > Good places to shop depend on your area. Sears carries Hitachi,
> > Tweater carries Mitsubishi and Pioneer. Conns also has a good
> > selection (Hitachi and Mitsubishi) and they have reasonably good
> > service. Both retailers mentioned offer price matching.
> >
> > Best of luck.
> >
> > -Jeremy
> > --------------------------------------------
> > New to HDTV, check out my HDTV Buyers FAQ
> > http://hdtv.0catch.com
> > --------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 5, 2004 11:34:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"JDeats" <jeremy@pdq.net> wrote in message
news:b0738dc6.0405041830.3c46a15a@posting.google.com...
> - Some manufactuers (namely: Sony, LG and Hitachi) include 1080i
> upconverters in some of their models, this makes normal non-HD
> programming look much better than it otherwise would.

This is not always true. Many sets look best displaying analog as 480i
(some don't allow this anymore, however) and some look best when it is
upconverted. It depends on too many variables to make blanket statements
like this sensible. Signal quality, analoge tuner and IF quality, analog
filtering, and any number of methods and levels of quality in digital
processing make the results hard to quantify. The best advice is to not
assume anything and view the set on the kind of signal that you will be
watching, then experiment with various methods of displaying the analog if
possible.

The notion that upconversion makes lower resolution images better is
pervasive, but quite wrong. You can't make gold from lead, even with good
alchemy. You can make scan lines less noticeable and filter some garbage in
the process, but you are just as likely to introduce artifacts that are less
than pleasing. Again, experiment.

> Rear-projection is still considered to produce the best picture quality
available, but

Many would dissagree. IMO, CRT based RPTV is certainly the best value, and
at any price point usually the best pix, but "best picture qualtiy" means
different things to different people. Again, the best advice is to view and
judge for yourself.

> a lot of things haven't changed about this technology: the sets are
> still bulky and heavy, almost all of them are CRT based and still burn
> phospher to produce an image (so they are highly subject to burn-in
> and have about 15-20 year life span), they still have a limited
> viewing angle and will dim when you get outside of their viewing
> angle.

15-20 years is very optimistic. 10-12 years for the better products is more
likely. Some less, some more, but any set this old will not look anything
like new. Viewing angles are rarely a problem and there is not much useful
difference between any of the RPTV technologies in this area. Again, this
matter depends on individual needs and you should view in the context of the
intended installation, but if viewing angles are a big deal, stay away from
any RPTV and get a PDP or direct view CRT.

Mostly, beware of any sweeping statements and assumptions, question
everything and insist on real answers that you can SEE, and do lots of
viewing and decide for yourself.

Leonard
Anonymous
May 5, 2004 10:20:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Leonard Caillouet" <lcaillonospam@devoynet.com> wrote in message news:<ij4mc.4481$nN6.1089@lakeread06>...
> "JDeats" <jeremy@pdq.net> wrote in message
> > Rear-projection is still considered to produce the best picture quality
> available, but
>
> Many would dissagree. IMO, CRT based RPTV is certainly the best value, and
> at any price point usually the best pix, but "best picture qualtiy" means
> different things to different people. Again, the best advice is to view and
> judge for yourself.
>

Well, I think you're right that many would disagree, but I would say
many are wrong and then I would offer this: There are plenty of
statements that can be made about all technologies that are fact. LCDs
have weak blacks (and weak dark levels in general), DLP's have
contrast problems (and some people seem to notice the rainbow effect).
Plasma's suffer the same issues as LCD.

The only negatives about CRT-rear projection technology are: 1. The
sets have be routinely focused and 2. The view angle isn't that good.

Sure each vendor applies their unique touch to the technology, but the
mentioned limitions are limitations of the core technology that powers
these devices. What is acuate color and what isn't is not subjective,
it can be proven. Picture quality is more subjective, but I consider
it a fact that higher resolution offers the capability to produce a
better quality picture. There's no need to get into the 1080i vs 720p
discussion (again).

I agree that people should buy what's best for them, but what their
eyes show them on a show room floor isn't always telling. And I think
there are enoguh facts about the various HDTV technologies to make the
statement that CRT based sets produce the best quality picture.

-Jeremy
May 6, 2004 1:01:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

This is the first I have heard about the TV sets needing to be
refocused. I had my last one for 20 years and it was only repaired
once. I never did anything other than that and the picture looked
fine.

Are they easy to focus? Or should I have the company come out and do
it?

I'm not too concerned about the view angle since we watch the TV
straight on.

Thanks for all of the information. I think this weekend I'll head
over to an electronics store and look at some different makes/models.

jeremy@pdq.net (JDeats) wrote in message news:<b0738dc6.0405051720.36ea6f69@posting.google.com>...
> "Leonard Caillouet" <lcaillonospam@devoynet.com> wrote in message news:<ij4mc.4481$nN6.1089@lakeread06>...
> > "JDeats" <jeremy@pdq.net> wrote in message
> > > Rear-projection is still considered to produce the best picture quality
> > available, but
> >
> > Many would dissagree. IMO, CRT based RPTV is certainly the best value, and
> > at any price point usually the best pix, but "best picture qualtiy" means
> > different things to different people. Again, the best advice is to view and
> > judge for yourself.
> >
>
> Well, I think you're right that many would disagree, but I would say
> many are wrong and then I would offer this: There are plenty of
> statements that can be made about all technologies that are fact. LCDs
> have weak blacks (and weak dark levels in general), DLP's have
> contrast problems (and some people seem to notice the rainbow effect).
> Plasma's suffer the same issues as LCD.
>
> The only negatives about CRT-rear projection technology are: 1. The
> sets have be routinely focused and 2. The view angle isn't that good.
>
> Sure each vendor applies their unique touch to the technology, but the
> mentioned limitions are limitations of the core technology that powers
> these devices. What is acuate color and what isn't is not subjective,
> it can be proven. Picture quality is more subjective, but I consider
> it a fact that higher resolution offers the capability to produce a
> better quality picture. There's no need to get into the 1080i vs 720p
> discussion (again).
>
> I agree that people should buy what's best for them, but what their
> eyes show them on a show room floor isn't always telling. And I think
> there are enoguh facts about the various HDTV technologies to make the
> statement that CRT based sets produce the best quality picture.
>
> -Jeremy
Anonymous
May 6, 2004 5:01:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

He's referring to convergence.

"Chip" <chip33az@netscape.net> wrote in message
news:fac293f3.0405060801.623b7ebb@posting.google.com...

> This is the first I have heard about the TV sets needing to be
> refocused.
Anonymous
May 6, 2004 8:16:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Convergence/Focus is something has has to be adjusted regularly on all
CRT based rear-projection sets. It isn't difficult to do (the owners
manual will explain the process quite well), it's just a little time
consuming. Generally speaking, the more points of convergence a set
has the more acurate it can be focused. For example almost all
Mitsubishi's offer 90-point convergence tweaking outside the service
menu (this means you'll have 90 points to test and correct if you
discover color problems), other brands generally offer less (e.g. JVC
and RCA typically offer only 9-point convergence outside their service
menu).

Some manufactuers (Sony, Hitachi, Toshiba, to name a few) offer auto
focus on some of their models which do an alright job, but they all
require manual fine tuning if you want the absolute best quality
picture the set is capable of.

I talk about convergence tweaking a bit in my buyers faq:
http://hdtv.0catch.com

-Jeremy


chip33az@netscape.net (Chip) wrote in message news:<fac293f3.0405060801.623b7ebb@posting.google.com>...
> This is the first I have heard about the TV sets needing to be
> refocused. I had my last one for 20 years and it was only repaired
> once. I never did anything other than that and the picture looked
> fine.
>
> Are they easy to focus? Or should I have the company come out and do
> it?
>
> I'm not too concerned about the view angle since we watch the TV
> straight on.
>
> Thanks for all of the information. I think this weekend I'll head
> over to an electronics store and look at some different makes/models.
>
> jeremy@pdq.net (JDeats) wrote in message news:<b0738dc6.0405051720.36ea6f69@posting.google.com>...
> > "Leonard Caillouet" <lcaillonospam@devoynet.com> wrote in message news:<ij4mc.4481$nN6.1089@lakeread06>...
> > > "JDeats" <jeremy@pdq.net> wrote in message
> > > > Rear-projection is still considered to produce the best picture quality
> > > available, but
> > >
> > > Many would dissagree. IMO, CRT based RPTV is certainly the best value, and
> > > at any price point usually the best pix, but "best picture qualtiy" means
> > > different things to different people. Again, the best advice is to view and
> > > judge for yourself.
> > >
> >
> > Well, I think you're right that many would disagree, but I would say
> > many are wrong and then I would offer this: There are plenty of
> > statements that can be made about all technologies that are fact. LCDs
> > have weak blacks (and weak dark levels in general), DLP's have
> > contrast problems (and some people seem to notice the rainbow effect).
> > Plasma's suffer the same issues as LCD.
> >
> > The only negatives about CRT-rear projection technology are: 1. The
> > sets have be routinely focused and 2. The view angle isn't that good.
> >
> > Sure each vendor applies their unique touch to the technology, but the
> > mentioned limitions are limitations of the core technology that powers
> > these devices. What is acuate color and what isn't is not subjective,
> > it can be proven. Picture quality is more subjective, but I consider
> > it a fact that higher resolution offers the capability to produce a
> > better quality picture. There's no need to get into the 1080i vs 720p
> > discussion (again).
> >
> > I agree that people should buy what's best for them, but what their
> > eyes show them on a show room floor isn't always telling. And I think
> > there are enoguh facts about the various HDTV technologies to make the
> > statement that CRT based sets produce the best quality picture.
> >
> > -Jeremy
Anonymous
May 9, 2004 1:13:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"JDeats" <jeremy@pdq.net> wrote in message
news:b0738dc6.0405061516.3e10f0e@posting.google.com...
> Convergence/Focus is something has has to be adjusted regularly on all
> CRT based rear-projection sets. It isn't difficult to do (the owners
> manual will explain the process quite well), it's just a little time
> consuming. Generally speaking, the more points of convergence a set
> has the more acurate it can be focused. For example almost all
> Mitsubishi's offer 90-point convergence tweaking outside the service
> menu (this means you'll have 90 points to test and correct if you
> discover color problems), other brands generally offer less (e.g. JVC
> and RCA typically offer only 9-point convergence outside their service
> menu).
>
> Some manufactuers (Sony, Hitachi, Toshiba, to name a few) offer auto
> focus on some of their models which do an alright job, but they all
> require manual fine tuning if you want the absolute best quality
> picture the set is capable of.
>
> I talk about convergence tweaking a bit in my buyers faq:
> http://hdtv.0catch.com

Just a correction

Focus and convergence are two separate issues.

Focus is a professional adjustment to make sure that painted electron beam
dot each CRT is as tight and symmetrical as possible.
Convergence is aligning those 3 dots from each tube so their optical outputs
land precisely on top of each other.

Very few sets offer user adjustment of focus.
!