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What to take into account when choosing a UPS?

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January 20, 2007 5:46:12 PM

Hi, I'm currently in the process of building a new rig, and I want to get a good UPS. I've never invested in a decent one before so I'm wondering what I should get for a rig that will utilize the following:

PSU - http://www.pcpower.com/products/viewproduct.php?show=T5...
Monitor - http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c...

I might eventually invest in an additional monitor of the same model for a dual display.

Also keep in mind the various other peripherals that will be attached (ie. printer, scanner, etc.)

What do you guys think? Thanks in advance!

More about : account choosing ups

January 20, 2007 7:45:49 PM

Well, you say you want a decent one. I take that to mean the best UPS technology there is for home use. That would be the dual conversion type where the AC input is used to charge the battery (continuously) and the battery DC is used to regenerate new AC for output to your computer. The new AC is a perfect, noiseless sine wave.

Depending on the manufacturer, these types of UPS are often called Smart UPS.

Mine is the Tripp-Lite SU1000xl, 1000VA, 800 watts, and not cheap.

-Bob
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January 20, 2007 8:37:04 PM

I use an APC ES 750. The area where I live has really bad AC power, so a UPS is an absolute necessity. The 750 size always has provided plenty of time for shutting down when the power goes out. The size needed really depends on how much equipment you have running off it. Read the requirements close, as you may get by on a smaller one then the 1500 that you listed.
January 20, 2007 9:05:28 PM

I have the APC Smart-UPS 1500 unit. All kind of features, has the remote shutdown you require. Plus, it has an optional network card that allows for remote shutdown Servers and NAS. Which is what I use mine for. Certified for server use. It can do this without any intervention on your part, once setup. So if your away from home it can shut it down and restart after power is restored.
January 20, 2007 9:06:49 PM

Don't plug a laser printer into a UPS. An inkjet is OK. The lasers draw way too much power, and will overload a home UPS. Since you will be going to a second monitor, I'd go a minimum of 800 watts to allow 15- 20 minutes of run time when the AC fails. Of course it doesn't take that long to shut down, but your UPS will have enough juice to do a second or third shutdown in case you experience successive power failures before the UPS has had a chance to recharge.

If you are not having problems with the quality of your AC, then the battery backup technology of the type you posted is perfectly adequate.

-Bob
January 20, 2007 9:16:08 PM

Quote:
I have the APC Smart-UPS 1500 unit. All kind of features, has the remote shutdown you require. Plus, it has an optional network card that allows for remote shutdown Servers and NAS. Which is what I use mine for. Certified for server use. It can do this without any intervention on your part, once setup. So if your away from home it can shut it down and restart after power is restored.


To avoid confusion, the original poster did not say anything about needing remote shutdown capabilities. If that feature is needed, then the OP will have to get a Smart UPS.

-Bob
January 20, 2007 9:17:47 PM

At 430 watts, you'll have ~12 minutes. At 800ish watts, ~ 3 minutes. Specs from APC's website.

I have the smart ups 1000, similar specs to Boba's tripplite, and as he said, good is not cheap. Your pick would be 'adequate' for most, but my workstation MUST be available 24 x 7.
January 20, 2007 9:33:11 PM

BobA, The network remote shut down is an optional card.

The smart-ups comes with a USB and serial port cables to connect to your pc. The way it works is when you loose power, a battery icon will appear in the right tray, telling you how much run time you have left. Just like it was a notebook.

I personally like a minimum of 20 min backup time. And do like loading them up more than 50-75% of rated load. Old School. If you have frequent power outage that last short periods this allows the UPS's to carry you through the outage.

Also be warned that you only want to connect your PC, Monitor and network equipment to allow you to finish your work. But do NOT connect any printers to the UPS side. If you go the cheaper Back-UPS unit you also get surge protection that is not battery backed up, for non criticle equipment.

1 Total wattage of Equipment that will be connected.
2. How long do you need backup.
This includes time to get to shutting down point of what you are doing.
3. Weather you need remote shutdown of other equipment.
!