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Brillian Corp. unveils LCOS HDTV

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  • HDTV
  • Home Theatre
Last response: in Home Theatre
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May 19, 2004 2:42:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

This looks interesting.

Of course if you do the math, 6m/8k = 750 units. But I'd love to see
what a 3-chip imager @ 1080 lines would look like, even just for
curiosity.

I'd also like to know *WHO* the 4 companies Intel will be looking to
work with are (near the end of thye article).

====================================================================

Brillian Corp. unveils high-definition television

By Ed Taylor, Tribune

Brillian Corp., a Tempe-based start-up company spun off from
Three-Five Systems, unveiled its new high-definition television
Thursday at a stockholders meeting, drawing gasps from attendees who
viewed the ultra-sharp pictures for the first time.

"That screen is awesome," said Len Copple, a Tempe city councilman and
an investor in Brillian, as he watched video of a space shuttle
launch. "That is so real, it's like you're actually standing there."

Another shareholder, Walter Schuch, believes the 65-inch diagonal
television will find buyers even though the retail price could be
$7,000 to $9,000.

"I think it's a narrow market, but I think it is good enough that
there are people who will pay that kind of money," he said.

The television uses technology called liquid crystal on silicon, or
LCOS, to display the images, which are so bright and have such a high
contrast that the moving pictures appear to be three dimensional. The
second-generation imager inside the television contains three
fingernail-sized semiconductor chips, each covered by a piece of glass
with a liquid crystal layer in between. The image is displayed on the
chip and optically magnified many times as it is projected onto the
screen.

The company has shown prototypes privately to industry analysts and a
few investors, but Thursday's demonstration was the first public
display, said marketing director Hope Frank.

Last month Brillian announced that it had received its first order,
valued at $6 million, for the new rear-projection HDTV from an
unidentified retailer that plans to put its own brand name on the
product. Brillian will make the imager in Tempe, and Suntron, a
Phoenix-based partner, will assemble the televisions in Tijuana,
Mexico. A 720-line version is expected to be available to consumers in
August, and a 1080-line version will be available early next year,
said Brillian CEO Vincent Sollitto.

In addition to making televisions that others can rebrand, Brillian
hopes to sell its LCOS imagers directly to television makers that can
design their own HDTVs around the component, Sollitto said. One of the
main problems with HDTV has been a shortage of programming, but
Brillian chairman Jack Saltich said more HDTV-formatted shows are on
the way. He cited the example of Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas
Mavericks NBA basketball team, who has started a network that
broadcast sports events in high definition.

Sollitto believes HDTV sales will explode as federal regulations move
the nation toward digital broadcasting. Eight million digital
televisions are expected to be sold in North America this year, and of
that total, 2.7 million will be larger than 50 inches, he said. If
Brillian can capture 10 percent of that market, it will be able to
report a 13 percent operating profit, he said. Under that scenario,
Brillian should be profitable next year, he said. But Brillian faces
competition.

Intel Corp. has announced that it is developing LCOS chip technology
that will be delivered to HDTV producers by the end of this year.
Intel has said four companies will use its chips — one based in the
United States, two on mainland China and one in Taiwan.

Will Strauss, a Tempe-based semiconductor industry analyst, said the
technology has good possibilities, but the retail price may have to
drop before can be called successful.

"I think there's an expectation the price will come down," he said.
"Everything I have ever seen coming out of the semiconductor industry
has continually decreased in price as they have gone through the
learning curve."

More about : brillian corp unveils lcos hdtv

May 20, 2004 8:13:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Do the three chips have to be converged?
There's nothing more bothersome than having a projection TV that needs
tweeking.
I know because I have one; my next tv will probably be plasma.

"G" <gaf1234567890@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:b7eb1fbe.0405190942.61bfd9fc@posting.google.com...
> This looks interesting.
>
> Of course if you do the math, 6m/8k = 750 units. But I'd love to see
> what a 3-chip imager @ 1080 lines would look like, even just for
> curiosity.
>
> I'd also like to know *WHO* the 4 companies Intel will be looking to
> work with are (near the end of thye article).
>
> ====================================================================
>
> Brillian Corp. unveils high-definition television
>
> By Ed Taylor, Tribune
>
> Brillian Corp., a Tempe-based start-up company spun off from
> Three-Five Systems, unveiled its new high-definition television
> Thursday at a stockholders meeting, drawing gasps from attendees who
> viewed the ultra-sharp pictures for the first time.
>
> "That screen is awesome," said Len Copple, a Tempe city councilman and
> an investor in Brillian, as he watched video of a space shuttle
> launch. "That is so real, it's like you're actually standing there."
>
> Another shareholder, Walter Schuch, believes the 65-inch diagonal
> television will find buyers even though the retail price could be
> $7,000 to $9,000.
>
> "I think it's a narrow market, but I think it is good enough that
> there are people who will pay that kind of money," he said.
>
> The television uses technology called liquid crystal on silicon, or
> LCOS, to display the images, which are so bright and have such a high
> contrast that the moving pictures appear to be three dimensional. The
> second-generation imager inside the television contains three
> fingernail-sized semiconductor chips, each covered by a piece of glass
> with a liquid crystal layer in between. The image is displayed on the
> chip and optically magnified many times as it is projected onto the
> screen.
>
> The company has shown prototypes privately to industry analysts and a
> few investors, but Thursday's demonstration was the first public
> display, said marketing director Hope Frank.
>
> Last month Brillian announced that it had received its first order,
> valued at $6 million, for the new rear-projection HDTV from an
> unidentified retailer that plans to put its own brand name on the
> product. Brillian will make the imager in Tempe, and Suntron, a
> Phoenix-based partner, will assemble the televisions in Tijuana,
> Mexico. A 720-line version is expected to be available to consumers in
> August, and a 1080-line version will be available early next year,
> said Brillian CEO Vincent Sollitto.
>
> In addition to making televisions that others can rebrand, Brillian
> hopes to sell its LCOS imagers directly to television makers that can
> design their own HDTVs around the component, Sollitto said. One of the
> main problems with HDTV has been a shortage of programming, but
> Brillian chairman Jack Saltich said more HDTV-formatted shows are on
> the way. He cited the example of Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas
> Mavericks NBA basketball team, who has started a network that
> broadcast sports events in high definition.
>
> Sollitto believes HDTV sales will explode as federal regulations move
> the nation toward digital broadcasting. Eight million digital
> televisions are expected to be sold in North America this year, and of
> that total, 2.7 million will be larger than 50 inches, he said. If
> Brillian can capture 10 percent of that market, it will be able to
> report a 13 percent operating profit, he said. Under that scenario,
> Brillian should be profitable next year, he said. But Brillian faces
> competition.
>
> Intel Corp. has announced that it is developing LCOS chip technology
> that will be delivered to HDTV producers by the end of this year.
> Intel has said four companies will use its chips - one based in the
> United States, two on mainland China and one in Taiwan.
>
> Will Strauss, a Tempe-based semiconductor industry analyst, said the
> technology has good possibilities, but the retail price may have to
> drop before can be called successful.
>
> "I think there's an expectation the price will come down," he said.
> "Everything I have ever seen coming out of the semiconductor industry
> has continually decreased in price as they have gone through the
> learning curve."
May 21, 2004 11:32:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"JAS" <spin500@cox.net> wrote in message news:<5k8rc.47852$pJ1.42896@lakeread02>...
> Do the three chips have to be converged?
> There's nothing more bothersome than having a projection TV that needs
> tweeking.
> I know because I have one; my next tv will probably be plasma.
>

Yes, they have to be converged. This is certainly something that has
the potential for problems (in theory at least).

But I would imagine that convergence issues are not exactly the same
compared to something like CRT projection. My guess is that 3-chip
LCOS light engines would be just as good or bad in this respect as
3-chip DLP or 3-pannel LCD rear projection TV's. I'm not trying to
stump for Sony or anything, but I honestly haven't heard of any
convergence problems with the 3-panel Sony 60" XBR950 in that regard.
Anonymous
May 21, 2004 5:30:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Yes, but it's permanent and the convergence cannot change like on a CRT set.
There is no user adjustment of any kind.

"JAS" <spin500@cox.net> wrote in message
news:5k8rc.47852$pJ1.42896@lakeread02...

> Do the three chips have to be converged?
Anonymous
May 21, 2004 7:37:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

G wrote:

> Yes, they have to be converged. This is certainly something that has
> the potential for problems (in theory at least).

G,

No disrespect intended, but everything I've read suggests that LCD,DLP,
and LCoS do not require convergence adjustment... indeed in the case of
LCOS (if not the other two) it would not be possible to do so in the field.

If I', mistaken I apologize in advance.

Jerry
!