Using Partiton Magic 8.0

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
me.
TIA
DFB


"When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into
his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
- Justice William O. Douglas
24 answers Last reply
More about using partiton magic
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Well, getting help from Symantec for their products is typical as you describe. Try uninstlaling and reinstall PM8 and see what happens.


    "MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    > then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    > can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    > I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    > Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    > running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    > PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    > me.
    > TIA
    > DFB
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    > constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into
    > his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    > - Justice William O. Douglas
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Disk management software is supplied by the manufacturer of the hard drive.
    It is also known as a drive overlay. It is useful on older computers that
    can not handle the large size hard drives due to hardware/bios limitations
    (many people use it to set up a new hard drive). The problem is, it
    interferes with almost everything. Even Windows XP has trouble with it at
    times.

    --
    Regards,

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

    If you knew as much as you think you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


    "MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    > then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    > can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    > I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    > Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    > running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    > PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    > me.
    > TIA
    > DFB
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    > constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters
    > into
    > his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    > - Justice William O. Douglas
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 12:22:17 -0500, "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote:

    >Well, getting help from Symantec for their products is typical as you describe. Try uninstlaling and reinstall PM8 and see what happens.
    >
    >
    >"MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >>I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    >> then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    >> can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    >> I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    >> Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    >> running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    >> PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for


    Thanks for the speedy reply.
    Have done that a few times trying different drives.
    No luck so far.


    "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into
    his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    - Justice William O. Douglas
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 12:48:51 -0500, "Crusty \(-: Old B@stard :-\)"
    <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Disk management software is supplied by the manufacturer of the hard drive.
    >It is also known as a drive overlay. It is useful on older computers that
    >can not handle the large size hard drives due to hardware/bios limitations
    >(many people use it to set up a new hard drive). The problem is, it
    >interferes with almost everything. Even Windows XP has trouble with it at
    >times.
    Thanks for the speedy reply. The comp is new, no overlay SW. Master
    HD (80 gig) partitioned 10, 20 and 50. Slave is another 80 from old
    comp.


    "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into
    his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    - Justice William O. Douglas
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Try going here www.terabyteunlimited.com, and download/install BooIt NG. It is a fully functional 30 day trial, and will do everything PM does, with more ease. Resize the drive in question, then uninstall BootIt, but I think it is a great deal for $35.

    "MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    > then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    > can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    > I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    > Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    > running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    > PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    > me.
    > TIA
    > DFB
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    > constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into
    > his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    > - Justice William O. Douglas
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 16:15:52 -0500, "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote:

    >Try going here www.terabyteunlimited.com, and download/install BooIt NG. It is a fully functional 30 day trial, and will do everything PM does, with more ease. Resize the drive in question, then uninstall BootIt, but I think it is a great deal for $35.
    >
    >"MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >>I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    >> then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    >> can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    >> I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    >> Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    >> running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    >> PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    >> me.
    >> TIA
    >> DFB
    Thanks for the reference. For some reason the program claims it can't
    resize the problem partition. Before I muck things up worse, can you
    give me the short course in how to get rid of the program?
    Do I just delete the entries it put in the root drive? The terrabyte
    website is short on answers.


    "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into
    his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    - Justice William O. Douglas
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 19:26:31 -0500, MisterSkippy
    <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote:

    >On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 16:15:52 -0500, "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Try going here www.terabyteunlimited.com, and download/install BooIt NG. It is a fully functional 30 day trial, and will do everything PM does, with more ease. Resize the drive in question, then uninstall BootIt, but I think it is a great deal for $35.
    >>
    >>"MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >>>I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    >>> then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    >>> can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    >>> I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    >>> Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    >>> running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    >>> PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    >>> me.
    >>> TIA
    >>> DFB
    >Thanks for the reference. For some reason the program claims it can't
    >resize the problem partition. Before I muck things up worse, can you
    >give me the short course in how to get rid of the program?
    >Do I just delete the entries it put in the root drive? The terrabyte
    >website is short on answers.

    My bad. I found the instructions to uninstall. All gone now.
    Again, thanks for the efforts.
    Regards
    DFB


    "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into
    his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    - Justice William O. Douglas
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Partitioning is only done for legacy users. It is one of the biggest
    problems amoung our Computer Club's users. The vendors glorify it at our
    General meetings, and our in-home trouble shooters spend hours fixing the
    problems. If you want to boot different operating systems, OK. Otherwise,
    Windows XP can get along without it.
    "MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:svsv01tageu75esimpf51t4n5j4j2o4cgi@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 19:26:31 -0500, MisterSkippy
    > <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 16:15:52 -0500, "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Try going here www.terabyteunlimited.com, and download/install BooIt NG.
    >>>It is a fully functional 30 day trial, and will do everything PM does,
    >>>with more ease. Resize the drive in question, then uninstall BootIt, but
    >>>I think it is a great deal for $35.
    >>>
    >>>"MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    >>>news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >>>>I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    >>>> then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    >>>> can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    >>>> I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    >>>> Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    >>>> running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    >>>> PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    >>>> me.
    >>>> TIA
    >>>> DFB
    >>Thanks for the reference. For some reason the program claims it can't
    >>resize the problem partition. Before I muck things up worse, can you
    >>give me the short course in how to get rid of the program?
    >>Do I just delete the entries it put in the root drive? The terrabyte
    >>website is short on answers.
    >
    > My bad. I found the instructions to uninstall. All gone now.
    > Again, thanks for the efforts.
    > Regards
    > DFB
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    > constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters
    > into
    > his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    > - Justice William O. Douglas
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    I agree. Besides, you can run legacy operating systems with Virtual PC 2004
    and not have to mess with multibooting.

    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    (Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
    "Chuck Davis" <newsgroup at anthemwebs dot com> wrote in message
    news:urtB6tjEFHA.960@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Partitioning is only done for legacy users. It is one of the biggest
    > problems amoung our Computer Club's users. The vendors glorify it at our
    > General meetings, and our in-home trouble shooters spend hours fixing the
    > problems. If you want to boot different operating systems, OK. Otherwise,
    > Windows XP can get along without it.
    > "MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    > news:svsv01tageu75esimpf51t4n5j4j2o4cgi@4ax.com...
    >> On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 19:26:31 -0500, MisterSkippy
    >> <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 16:15:52 -0500, "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Try going here www.terabyteunlimited.com, and download/install BooIt NG.
    >>>>It is a fully functional 30 day trial, and will do everything PM does,
    >>>>with more ease. Resize the drive in question, then uninstall BootIt, but
    >>>>I think it is a great deal for $35.
    >>>>
    >>>>"MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    >>>>news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    >>>>>I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    >>>>> then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    >>>>> can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    >>>>> I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    >>>>> Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    >>>>> running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    >>>>> PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    >>>>> me.
    >>>>> TIA
    >>>>> DFB
    >>>Thanks for the reference. For some reason the program claims it can't
    >>>resize the problem partition. Before I muck things up worse, can you
    >>>give me the short course in how to get rid of the program?
    >>>Do I just delete the entries it put in the root drive? The terrabyte
    >>>website is short on answers.
    >>
    >> My bad. I found the instructions to uninstall. All gone now.
    >> Again, thanks for the efforts.
    >> Regards
    >> DFB
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    >> constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters
    >> into
    >> his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    >> - Justice William O. Douglas
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Some chap on the following link had a problem similar to yours, his solution
    may help you?

    http://forums.betarun.net/showthread-19.html

    Regards
    Joe Steele
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Does the Error Message have a number?


    --


    Hope this helps.

    Gerry
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    FCA

    Using invalid email address

    Stourport, Worcs, England
    Enquire, plan and execute.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Please tell the newsgroup how any
    suggested solution worked for you.

    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:evav01147vbn5t6bq3f4n35qpr2nkui51b@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 12:48:51 -0500, "Crusty \(-: Old B@stard :-\)"
    > <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Disk management software is supplied by the manufacturer of the hard
    >>drive.
    >>It is also known as a drive overlay. It is useful on older computers
    >>that
    >>can not handle the large size hard drives due to hardware/bios
    >>limitations
    >>(many people use it to set up a new hard drive). The problem is, it
    >>interferes with almost everything. Even Windows XP has trouble with it
    >>at
    >>times.
    > Thanks for the speedy reply. The comp is new, no overlay SW. Master
    > HD (80 gig) partitioned 10, 20 and 50. Slave is another 80 from old
    > comp.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a
    > citizen's
    > constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take
    > matters into
    > his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at
    > all."
    > - Justice William O. Douglas
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    For the simple minded, yes XP can manage a single large volume disk.

    If one wants to manage and prepare for disaster recovery using only one hard
    drive, then partitioning is essential.

    Let me explain: once you have spent hours and hours configuring your PC with
    XP and the dozen or so applications and / or games: then it is most
    advantages to use an application such as Ghost to IMAGE the drive. The image
    file can be used to recreate the hard drive in case of a catastrophe.

    One cannot take an image file and 'restore' it to the same hard drive or
    partition on which it is located. Thus partitioning the Hard Drive is VERY
    BENEFICIAL andmost useful.

    To restore the drive from the image file may take up to one hour only as
    opposed to a day or two needed for reinstalling XP and the dozen or so
    applications and then copying all one's personal data back to the C Drive off
    CDs.


    "Colin Barnhorst" wrote:

    > I agree. Besides, you can run legacy operating systems with Virtual PC 2004
    > and not have to mess with multibooting.
    >
    > --
    > Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    > (Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
    > "Chuck Davis" <newsgroup at anthemwebs dot com> wrote in message
    > news:urtB6tjEFHA.960@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > > Partitioning is only done for legacy users. It is one of the biggest
    > > problems amoung our Computer Club's users. The vendors glorify it at our
    > > General meetings, and our in-home trouble shooters spend hours fixing the
    > > problems. If you want to boot different operating systems, OK. Otherwise,
    > > Windows XP can get along without it.
    > > "MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    > > news:svsv01tageu75esimpf51t4n5j4j2o4cgi@4ax.com...
    > >> On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 19:26:31 -0500, MisterSkippy
    > >> <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 16:15:52 -0500, "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>Try going here www.terabyteunlimited.com, and download/install BooIt NG.
    > >>>>It is a fully functional 30 day trial, and will do everything PM does,
    > >>>>with more ease. Resize the drive in question, then uninstall BootIt, but
    > >>>>I think it is a great deal for $35.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>"MisterSkippy" <MisterSkippy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    > >>>>news:9k1v011opmk39usof9dlbo8ia9ff5lktg1@4ax.com...
    > >>>>>I wanted to resize a partition. I installed PM 8.0. It starts to run
    > >>>>> then stalls. If I start PM from the its rescue disks it tells me it
    > >>>>> can't run because disk management software is not running. Naturally
    > >>>>> I've already tried reinstalling, uninstalling/reinstalling PM etc.
    > >>>>> Is this disk management software something in XP that should be
    > >>>>> running? If it is, any ideas how to turn it on?
    > >>>>> PM website, help, MS KB, and Google haven't produced any answers for
    > >>>>> me.
    > >>>>> TIA
    > >>>>> DFB
    > >>>Thanks for the reference. For some reason the program claims it can't
    > >>>resize the problem partition. Before I muck things up worse, can you
    > >>>give me the short course in how to get rid of the program?
    > >>>Do I just delete the entries it put in the root drive? The terrabyte
    > >>>website is short on answers.
    > >>
    > >> My bad. I found the instructions to uninstall. All gone now.
    > >> Again, thanks for the efforts.
    > >> Regards
    > >> DFB
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's
    > >> constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters
    > >> into
    > >> his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all."
    > >> - Justice William O. Douglas
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:0F6ECBB7-2907-48CA-9E96-E3C1B6172767@microsoft.com,
    BAR <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > For the simple minded, yes XP can manage a single large volume
    > disk.
    >
    > If one wants to manage and prepare for disaster recovery using
    > only
    > one hard drive, then partitioning is essential.
    >
    > Let me explain: once you have spent hours and hours configuring
    > your
    > PC with XP and the dozen or so applications and / or games:
    > then it
    > is most advantages to use an application such as Ghost to IMAGE
    > the
    > drive. The image file can be used to recreate the hard drive
    > in case
    > of a catastrophe.
    >
    > One cannot take an image file and 'restore' it to the same hard
    > drive
    > or partition on which it is located. Thus partitioning the
    > Hard
    > Drive is VERY BENEFICIAL andmost useful.


    If you are suggesting using an image file to a second partition
    for backup, I would strongly urge you to reconsider that backup
    startegy. I don't recommend backup to a second partition because
    it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the original
    and backup to many of the most common dangers: head crashes,
    severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks,
    even theft of the computer.


    In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
    kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
    example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
    should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
    those generations should be stored off-site.


    My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
    scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
    sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
    and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Salut/Hi Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-),

    le/on Sun, 13 Feb 2005 15:49:36 -0500, tu disais/you said:-

    >Disk management software, which you said is causing problems, is a type of
    >disk overlay program. Different manufacturers call it by different names.
    >
    >Three weeks ago I installed a new 160 gig hard drive in a clients computer.
    >I figured I would use the software that came with the WD drive.

    WD????

    In UK speak that's War Department.

    In computer speak... err. Could you translate into something human readable
    please.

    Word document?

    Wonderful Disk?


    --
    All the Best
    Ian Hoare
    http://www.souvigne.com
    mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Western Digital

    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    (Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
    "Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
    news:h7i111hjnce0or9lrdqsghoju250fqcb21@4ax.com...
    > Salut/Hi Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-),
    >
    > le/on Sun, 13 Feb 2005 15:49:36 -0500, tu disais/you said:-
    >
    >>Disk management software, which you said is causing problems, is a type of
    >>disk overlay program. Different manufacturers call it by different names.
    >>
    >>Three weeks ago I installed a new 160 gig hard drive in a clients
    >>computer.
    >>I figured I would use the software that came with the WD drive.
    >
    > WD????
    >
    > In UK speak that's War Department.
    >
    > In computer speak... err. Could you translate into something human
    > readable
    > please.
    >
    > Word document?
    >
    > Wonderful Disk?
    >
    >
    > --
    > All the Best
    > Ian Hoare
    > http://www.souvigne.com
    > mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
  16. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:h7i111hjnce0or9lrdqsghoju250fqcb21@4ax.com,
    Ian Hoare <ianhoare@angelfire.com> typed:

    > Salut/Hi Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-),
    >
    > le/on Sun, 13 Feb 2005 15:49:36 -0500, tu disais/you said:-
    >
    >> Disk management software, which you said is causing problems,
    >> is a
    >> type of disk overlay program. Different manufacturers call it
    >> by
    >> different names.
    >>
    >> Three weeks ago I installed a new 160 gig hard drive in a
    >> clients
    >> computer. I figured I would use the software that came with
    >> the WD
    >> drive.
    >
    > WD????
    >
    > In UK speak that's War Department.
    >
    > In computer speak... err. Could you translate into something
    > human
    > readable please.


    he means Western Digital, a well-known manufacturer of hard
    drives.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  17. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Salut/Hi Ken Blake,

    le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 08:36:13 -0700, tu disais/you said:-

    >In news:0F6ECBB7-2907-48CA-9E96-E3C1B6172767@microsoft.com,
    >BAR <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    >> For the simple minded, yes XP can manage a single large volume
    >> disk.
    >>
    >> If one wants to manage and prepare for disaster recovery using
    >> only one hard drive, then partitioning is essential.

    >If you are suggesting using an image file to a second partition
    >for backup, I would strongly urge you to reconsider that backup
    >startegy. I don't recommend backup to a second partition because
    >it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the original
    >and backup to many of the most common dangers: head crashes,
    >severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks,
    >even theft of the computer.

    Couldn't agree more. In fact, I can think of very few catastrophes which
    would render one partition unavailable without doing the same to the entire
    disk.

    >In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
    >kept in the computer.

    Agreed. Which is why I made the idiotic mistake of buying the 2 Gig Iomega
    SCSI Jaz drive. That managed to eat 3 removable drives and render them
    unusable before I finally gave up on it. I now have a little Freecom USB2 30
    gig drive.

    > For really secure backup (needed, for example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
    >should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of those generations should be stored off-site.

    Agreed again, though Bruce might well call an emergency off site backup copy
    of software "Piracy" (GD&R Yes I know there's a difference between "data"
    and "applications", but quite a number of my applications were downloaded).

    --
    All the Best
    Ian Hoare
    http://www.souvigne.com
    mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
  18. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    It is not piracy since the backup cannot be run in its backup form.

    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    (Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
    "Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
    news:ulj111dpniinaptbh7u2f9ceu41knmi97e@4ax.com...
    > Salut/Hi Ken Blake,
    >
    > le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 08:36:13 -0700, tu disais/you said:-
    >
    >>In news:0F6ECBB7-2907-48CA-9E96-E3C1B6172767@microsoft.com,
    >>BAR <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >
    >>> For the simple minded, yes XP can manage a single large volume
    >>> disk.
    >>>
    >>> If one wants to manage and prepare for disaster recovery using
    >>> only one hard drive, then partitioning is essential.
    >
    >>If you are suggesting using an image file to a second partition
    >>for backup, I would strongly urge you to reconsider that backup
    >>startegy. I don't recommend backup to a second partition because
    >>it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the original
    >>and backup to many of the most common dangers: head crashes,
    >>severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks,
    >>even theft of the computer.
    >
    > Couldn't agree more. In fact, I can think of very few catastrophes which
    > would render one partition unavailable without doing the same to the
    > entire
    > disk.
    >
    >>In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
    >>kept in the computer.
    >
    > Agreed. Which is why I made the idiotic mistake of buying the 2 Gig Iomega
    > SCSI Jaz drive. That managed to eat 3 removable drives and render them
    > unusable before I finally gave up on it. I now have a little Freecom USB2
    > 30
    > gig drive.
    >
    >> For really secure backup (needed, for example, if the life of your
    >> business depends on your data) you
    >>should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of those
    >>generations should be stored off-site.
    >
    > Agreed again, though Bruce might well call an emergency off site backup
    > copy
    > of software "Piracy" (GD&R Yes I know there's a difference between "data"
    > and "applications", but quite a number of my applications were
    > downloaded).
    >
    > --
    > All the Best
    > Ian Hoare
    > http://www.souvigne.com
    > mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
  19. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:ePoRg3tEFHA.628@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    Colin Barnhorst <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> typed:

    > It is not piracy since the backup cannot be run in its backup
    > form.


    It depends on what form that backup drive is. It *could* be a
    complete clone of the original drive.

    But regardless of what form it's in, it's not piracy because what
    I recommended is not installing it on a second computer or even
    on a second drive or partition on the same computer; it's making
    a copy on a drive not installed in any computer.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    >
    >> Salut/Hi Ken Blake,
    >>
    >> le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 08:36:13 -0700, tu disais/you said:-
    >>
    >>> In news:0F6ECBB7-2907-48CA-9E96-E3C1B6172767@microsoft.com,
    >>> BAR <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >>
    >>>> For the simple minded, yes XP can manage a single large
    >>>> volume
    >>>> disk.
    >>>>
    >>>> If one wants to manage and prepare for disaster recovery
    >>>> using
    >>>> only one hard drive, then partitioning is essential.
    >>
    >>> If you are suggesting using an image file to a second
    >>> partition
    >>> for backup, I would strongly urge you to reconsider that
    >>> backup
    >>> startegy. I don't recommend backup to a second partition
    >>> because
    >>> it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
    >>> original
    >>> and backup to many of the most common dangers: head crashes,
    >>> severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus
    >>> attacks,
    >>> even theft of the computer.
    >>
    >> Couldn't agree more. In fact, I can think of very few
    >> catastrophes
    >> which would render one partition unavailable without doing the
    >> same
    >> to the entire
    >> disk.
    >>
    >>> In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and
    >>> not
    >>> kept in the computer.
    >>
    >> Agreed. Which is why I made the idiotic mistake of buying the
    >> 2 Gig
    >> Iomega SCSI Jaz drive. That managed to eat 3 removable drives
    >> and
    >> render them unusable before I finally gave up on it. I now
    >> have a
    >> little Freecom USB2 30
    >> gig drive.
    >>
    >>> For really secure backup (needed, for example, if the life of
    >>> your
    >>> business depends on your data) you
    >>> should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one
    >>> of
    >>> those generations should be stored off-site.
    >>
    >> Agreed again, though Bruce might well call an emergency off
    >> site
    >> backup copy
    >> of software "Piracy" (GD&R Yes I know there's a difference
    >> between
    >> "data" and "applications", but quite a number of my
    >> applications were
    >> downloaded).
    >>
    >> --
    >> All the Best
    >> Ian Hoare
    >> http://www.souvigne.com
    >> mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
  20. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Ken Blake wrote:
    > In news:0F6ECBB7-2907-48CA-9E96-E3C1B6172767@microsoft.com,
    > BAR <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >
    >
    >>For the simple minded, yes XP can manage a single large volume
    >>disk.
    >>
    >>If one wants to manage and prepare for disaster recovery using
    >>only
    >>one hard drive, then partitioning is essential.
    >>
    >>Let me explain: once you have spent hours and hours configuring
    >>your
    >>PC with XP and the dozen or so applications and / or games:
    >>then it
    >>is most advantages to use an application such as Ghost to IMAGE
    >>the
    >>drive. The image file can be used to recreate the hard drive
    >>in case
    >>of a catastrophe.
    >>
    >>One cannot take an image file and 'restore' it to the same hard
    >>drive
    >>or partition on which it is located. Thus partitioning the
    >>Hard
    >>Drive is VERY BENEFICIAL andmost useful.
    >
    >
    >
    > If you are suggesting using an image file to a second partition
    > for backup, I would strongly urge you to reconsider that backup
    > startegy. I don't recommend backup to a second partition because
    > it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the original
    > and backup to many of the most common dangers: head crashes,
    > severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks,
    > even theft of the computer.
    >
    >
    > In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
    > kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
    > example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
    > should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
    > those generations should be stored off-site.
    >
    >
    >
    > My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
    > scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
    > sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
    > and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.
    >
    >
    I echo what Ken says above. For those who have followed my trials
    and woes in past months, I can say that, with good help in this
    group (and a few barbs and arrows), I have a working procedure that
    involves Partition Magic 8 in conjunction with Drive Image 7.

    I have two hard drives. Both need only be in the computer, as
    a Master and a Slave, periodically when I make a drive image of my
    Master drive, on the Slave drive. Should anything go bad with the
    Master, I use Drive Image 7 to restore to the master, what it
    contained when the drive image was made.

    Partition Magic, in this simplified system, is almost superfluous,
    except that it is a handy tool for increasing and decreasing the sizes
    of partitions.
    --
    William B. Lurie
  21. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Salut/Hi Ken Blake,

    le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 13:25:13 -0700, tu disais/you said:-


    >>> Three weeks ago I installed a new 160 gig hard drive in a
    >>> clients computer. I figured I would use the software that came with
    >>> the WD drive.
    >>
    >> WD????
    >>
    >> In UK speak that's War Department.
    >>
    >> In computer speak... err. Could you translate into something
    >> human readable please.
    >
    >he means Western Digital, a well-known manufacturer of hard
    >drives.

    Thanks very much Ken. Although I've heard (obviously) of them, their name
    simply didn't come to mind, although I was racking what's left of my brain.

    --
    All the Best
    Ian Hoare
    http://www.souvigne.com
    mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
  22. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:ft4211lah4dvjour9bd1v91fq7080u5q3e@4ax.com,
    Ian Hoare <ianhoare@angelfire.com> typed:

    > Salut/Hi Ken Blake,

    >>> WD????
    >>>
    >>> In UK speak that's War Department.
    >>>
    >>> In computer speak... err. Could you translate into something
    >>> human readable please.
    >>
    >> he means Western Digital, a well-known manufacturer of hard
    >> drives.
    >
    > Thanks very much Ken. Although I've heard (obviously) of them,
    > their
    > name simply didn't come to mind, although I was racking what's
    > left
    > of my brain.


    You're welcome, Ian.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  23. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Salut/Hi "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com>,

    le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:40:58 -0700, tu disais/you said:-

    >It is not piracy since the backup cannot be run in its backup form.

    With respect, Colin, BAR's comments (which we could have preserved had you
    not top posted and then used a sig delimiter which makes properly configured
    newsreaders remove anything below the --) talked about using - I quote:-

    >an application such as Ghost to IMAGE the drive. The image
    >file can be used to recreate the hard drive in case of a catastrophe.

    Such an image file could well be run.

    I'm not disputing for the sake of it, but I'd have hoped you might have
    recognised that I was very gently mocking Bruce Chambers' somewhat eccentric
    view of life. Sadly it seems that I was mistaken. You do understand the
    abbreviation "GD&R" don't you? Because if you did, the comment was obviously
    not to be taken seriously.


    --
    All the Best
    Ian Hoare
    http://www.souvigne.com
    mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
  24. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    <billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
    news:OyTxIXuEFHA.2876@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Ken Blake wrote:
    >> In news:0F6ECBB7-2907-48CA-9E96-E3C1B6172767@microsoft.com,
    >> BAR <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >>
    >>
    >>>For the simple minded, yes XP can manage a single large volume disk.
    >>>
    >>>If one wants to manage and prepare for disaster recovery using only
    >>>one hard drive, then partitioning is essential.
    >>>
    >>>Let me explain: once you have spent hours and hours configuring your
    >>>PC with XP and the dozen or so applications and / or games: then it
    >>>is most advantages to use an application such as Ghost to IMAGE the
    >>>drive. The image file can be used to recreate the hard drive in case
    >>>of a catastrophe.
    >>>
    >>>One cannot take an image file and 'restore' it to the same hard drive
    >>>or partition on which it is located. Thus partitioning the Hard
    >>>Drive is VERY BENEFICIAL andmost useful.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> If you are suggesting using an image file to a second partition for
    >> backup, I would strongly urge you to reconsider that backup startegy. I
    >> don't recommend backup to a second partition because it leaves you
    >> susceptible to simultaneous loss of the original and backup to many of
    >> the most common dangers: head crashes, severe power glitches, nearby
    >> lightning strikes, virus attacks, even theft of the computer.
    >>
    >>
    >> In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not kept in
    >> the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for example, if the life
    >> of your business depends on your data) you should have multiple
    >> generations of backup, and at least one of those generations should be
    >> stored off-site.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup scheme uses
    >> two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a sleeve installed in
    >> the computer. I alternate between the two, and use Drive Image to make a
    >> complete copy of the primary drive.
    >>
    >>
    > I echo what Ken says above. For those who have followed my trials
    > and woes in past months, I can say that, with good help in this
    > group (and a few barbs and arrows), I have a working procedure that
    > involves Partition Magic 8 in conjunction with Drive Image 7.
    >
    > I have two hard drives. Both need only be in the computer, as
    > a Master and a Slave, periodically when I make a drive image of my
    > Master drive, on the Slave drive. Should anything go bad with the
    > Master, I use Drive Image 7 to restore to the master, what it
    > contained when the drive image was made.
    >
    > Partition Magic, in this simplified system, is almost superfluous, except
    > that it is a handy tool for increasing and decreasing the sizes
    > of partitions.
    > --
    > William B. Lurie

    Bill,

    It is wonderful to hear that at long last you are actually Drive Image 7
    to make backup images which you can later restore if and when necessary.
    This is a great leap forward from your previous grinding determination to
    produce " Clones" of your master drive and the consequent booting
    difficulties that you suffered.

    You now only need one further small step to take you to Backup Nirvana. Get
    yourself an external USB2 hard drive enclosure or a removable hard drive
    sleeve for your e-machine. Backups images can then be made as often as you
    like and, by using Incrementals, could be on a daily basis. It is common
    sense to keep several days worth of backups. The only time that you would
    then have to open the computer case would be to replace a failed internal
    drive or other equipment.

    Whole system backups may seem a bit over the top for the casual computer
    user but the peace of mind and the ability to recover in under an hour from
    most conceivable disasters is well worth the small extra expense. Not having
    to decide what to backup is a bonus, one just backs up the whole system.

    Good Luck.

    Richard.
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