Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

4 Grand to spend on tv, what would you get

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
May 25, 2004 4:21:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

or what did you buy and wish you didn't

I'm eyeing up the 60" Sony, Hitatchi, and Panasonic (all LCD)

Also what is the best antenna for local over the air HD signals?

Thanks to all who reply

More about : grand spend

Anonymous
May 25, 2004 10:19:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I got my 1993 Mitsubishi 26" TV fixed for $50 today. The Vertical IC Chip needed
replacement. I only had a horizontal line on my screen. The repairman came by,
plugged in the set, saw the horizontal line, then BANGED on the back of the set
and we got a picture. Now see, if I had brought the TV to his shop, I may or may
not have had a horizontal line on my screen if he plugged it in at his shop.
This is the value of "In Home Service". Intermittent problems can be discovered
without the added variable of transportation of the unit to the repair shop!

Besides, all the TV's I saw on the internet that I would deem to buy wouldn't
fit on my current TV cart! Maybe selection would be better in 2007? I'm too
disappointed in my TV shopping short-list this month!!!
Anonymous
May 25, 2004 10:52:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Cymbal Man Freq." <Don't Bother@ForgedPostsAnonymous.unorg> wrote in
message news:5ABsc.248095$M3.227257@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> I got my 1993 Mitsubishi 26" TV fixed for $50 today. The Vertical IC Chip
needed
> replacement. I only had a horizontal line on my screen. The repairman came
by,
> plugged in the set, saw the horizontal line, then BANGED on the back of
the set
> and we got a picture. Now see, if I had brought the TV to his shop, I may
or may
> not have had a horizontal line on my screen if he plugged it in at his
shop.
> This is the value of "In Home Service". Intermittent problems can be
discovered
> without the added variable of transportation of the unit to the repair
shop!
>
> Besides, all the TV's I saw on the internet that I would deem to buy
wouldn't
> fit on my current TV cart! Maybe selection would be better in 2007? I'm
too
> disappointed in my TV shopping short-list this month!!!

There are several apparent misconceptions and "the rest of the story" to be
told here.

First, any decent tech who is told of an intermittent vertical collapse
knows that the most common repair on televisions of this era is to resolder
the bad connections on the vertical output IC. He probably did this rather
than replacing the chip, especially for $50. Even for just resoldering it,
this would be an atypical rate in most markets. Most shops would charge an
extra $50 just to come out and do the job in the field. In most cases, the
value of in-home service is that you don't pay for the trip out.

With most intermittent problems, in-home service is, in fact, a big mistake.
What if the tech can't get the problem to occur when he is there? We
routinely run into problems that require days of testing just to get the
symptom to occur. While in the shop, we can be much more thorough because
we have better test equipment, better lighting and access, and better
soldering equipment. We can also spend a lot more time on each item
serviced and take multiple "looks" for problems or potential problems.

What the tech likely didn't do on your 1993 Mitsubishi is check a few dozen
capacitors for electrolyte leakage that is likely causing corrosion on the
traces of your circuit board, check for bad solder connections in other
circuits that are typical, adjust the focus and white balance, test the CRT
emission level, perform an a.c. leakage test, and run the unit on test to be
sure that the intermittent problems were solved. All of this would be done
by a good tech in a good shop, and you would likely pay about $60-80. Any
tech that fixes a set like this in-home for $50 either does a lot of
half-ass jobs or won't be in business for long. Actually, the likelihood is
that if you brought it into my shop you would have only paid $30 and you
would have received an estimate that said that you have a dozen or so leaky
caps that need to be changed or you will have the same and other problems
occurring very soon. This is very typical of many of these sets. Typical
repairs of these is between $80-120 labor and $20-50 parts if it has bad
capacitors. We go behind shops that just patch problems like yours all of
the time. We have a local appliance repair business that also fixes
televisions that charges the kind of rates you described and does this kind
of work. I can't count the number of jobs that I have followed them on,
just like another couple of local "techs" that work out of their homes.

In-home service is practical sometimes, but typically only on sets that are
not sensible to move. In most cases, it makes more sense to get it into the
shop.

Leonard
Related resources
Anonymous
May 25, 2004 12:12:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Leonard Caillouet" <no@no.com> wrote in message news:<PxFsc.10917$zE6.8114@lakeread06>...
> "Cymbal Man Freq." <Don't Bother@ForgedPostsAnonymous.unorg> wrote in
> message news:5ABsc.248095$M3.227257@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> > I got my 1993 Mitsubishi 26" TV fixed for $50 today. The Vertical IC Chip
> needed
> > replacement. I only had a horizontal line on my screen. The repairman came
> by,
> > plugged in the set, saw the horizontal line, then BANGED on the back of
> the set
> > and we got a picture. Now see, if I had brought the TV to his shop, I may
> or may
> > not have had a horizontal line on my screen if he plugged it in at his
> shop.
> > This is the value of "In Home Service". Intermittent problems can be
> discovered
> > without the added variable of transportation of the unit to the repair
> shop!
> >
> > Besides, all the TV's I saw on the internet that I would deem to buy
> wouldn't
> > fit on my current TV cart! Maybe selection would be better in 2007? I'm
> too
> > disappointed in my TV shopping short-list this month!!!
>
> There are several apparent misconceptions and "the rest of the story" to be
> told here.
>
> First, any decent tech who is told of an intermittent vertical collapse
> knows that the most common repair on televisions of this era is to resolder
> the bad connections on the vertical output IC. He probably did this rather
> than replacing the chip, especially for $50. Even for just resoldering it,
> this would be an atypical rate in most markets. Most shops would charge an
> extra $50 just to come out and do the job in the field. In most cases, the
> value of in-home service is that you don't pay for the trip out.
>
> [snip]
>
> In-home service is practical sometimes, but typically only on sets that are
> not sensible to move. In most cases, it makes more sense to get it into the
> shop.
>
I loved this thread a lot more than I thought I would.
May 25, 2004 5:23:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

If I had it do do over, and had $4000 to spend.... hmmmm....

BTW - first time around I got a 55" Mitsubishi 55819.

If you have the room for it (light controlled), I'd seriously look into
getting a front projection setup. The new Panasonic AE500 1280X720p
projector can be had for under $2500, and leave you $1500 for a 100" or
larger screen, and cables.

Or second, I would have to look hard at the Samsung DLP set's, simply
because you don't have any burn-in concerns with DLP, and you won't hurt the
set running it overly bright to compensate for a bright room.

My $0.02.
Anonymous
May 26, 2004 6:03:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Yeah i looked at the Samsung DLP, i love the color and brightness, but i'm
after a bit more size than what they come in. Plus i find the blacks not
that great. I might take a look at the 8 color wheel DLP's comming this
summer.

Are the LCD tv's prone to burn in? I thought they weren't. not sure.

The main purpose of the set would be for movies in a dim lit room. I don't
have the space to mount a screen and my room isn't dark e nough for a front
projection.

Thanks for the input, how about an antenna?





"Red" <redmond@microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:VMHsc.76$Ly.0@attbi_s01...
> If I had it do do over, and had $4000 to spend.... hmmmm....
>
> BTW - first time around I got a 55" Mitsubishi 55819.
>
> If you have the room for it (light controlled), I'd seriously look into
> getting a front projection setup. The new Panasonic AE500 1280X720p
> projector can be had for under $2500, and leave you $1500 for a 100" or
> larger screen, and cables.
>
> Or second, I would have to look hard at the Samsung DLP set's, simply
> because you don't have any burn-in concerns with DLP, and you won't hurt
> the
> set running it overly bright to compensate for a bright room.
>
> My $0.02.
>
>
May 26, 2004 6:56:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

At the moment, I'm unclear about LCD and burn-in. I thought they were
immune like DLP, but recently have read serveral articles that describe that
it is possible to occur on lcd as well, but I think this is in EXTREME
cases, like getting a 16X9 tv, and watching 4X3 tv centered with black
sidebars for hundreds of hours on end. I don't think it's the same thing as
phosphor wear on a CRT, it's more of an issue with the liquid crystals
getting stuck in position. One old note read on this stated:

--------
Burn-in or Screen-Burn with LCD Monitors

Burn-in like effect does happen with LCD monitors but they are correctable
as Guy explains below:

"The burn-in like effects refer to a memory effect which can affect LCD
displays. It isn't a permanent effect like that which happens with emissive
phosphors.

Basically, the liquid crystal displays work by using electrical forces to
align liquid crystal molecules into a coherent direction which causes a
predictable and controlled polarization of light. Combining that with
crossed, fixed polarizers, light filters and a light source allows one to
create the color images we see on LCD's. The one part of this which gets
forgotten is that the relaxed, incoherent state of the liquid crystal must
be returned to after the control charges are done.

If a LC panel holds a portion of the liquid crystal in the coherent state
(black on screen) the liquid crystal material can temporarily develop a
tendency to stay in a more organized manner than normal. Thus long term
black on a LC display may create an area which holds a persistent image
effect that looks like a phosphor burn. Fortunately, if the LC panel is
allowed to be quiescent (off) for an extended time, perhaps one or two days,
the liquid crystal regains its normal characteristics. The effect reverses
and the apparent "wear" or "burn" goes away. Another mechanism I've run
across, but haven't verified, is a temporary charge problem on the driving
transistors. Again leaving the panel off corrects the problem."

------

For antenna's, there are probably many that will work well, but the Channel
Master 4228 has been a good pick in my locale. If you have VHF
requirements, note that the 4228 is a UHF only antenna. (Works fine for me
down to about channel 5 in my area)
Anonymous
May 27, 2004 6:37:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

great post, thank you very much

answered a few good questions, thanks!




"Red" <redmond@microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D e2tc.115789$536.21564112@attbi_s03...
> At the moment, I'm unclear about LCD and burn-in. I thought they were
> immune like DLP, but recently have read serveral articles that describe
> that
> it is possible to occur on lcd as well, but I think this is in EXTREME
> cases, like getting a 16X9 tv, and watching 4X3 tv centered with black
> sidebars for hundreds of hours on end. I don't think it's the same thing
> as
> phosphor wear on a CRT, it's more of an issue with the liquid crystals
> getting stuck in position. One old note read on this stated:
>
> --------
> Burn-in or Screen-Burn with LCD Monitors
>
> Burn-in like effect does happen with LCD monitors but they are correctable
> as Guy explains below:
>
> "The burn-in like effects refer to a memory effect which can affect LCD
> displays. It isn't a permanent effect like that which happens with
> emissive
> phosphors.
>
> Basically, the liquid crystal displays work by using electrical forces to
> align liquid crystal molecules into a coherent direction which causes a
> predictable and controlled polarization of light. Combining that with
> crossed, fixed polarizers, light filters and a light source allows one to
> create the color images we see on LCD's. The one part of this which gets
> forgotten is that the relaxed, incoherent state of the liquid crystal must
> be returned to after the control charges are done.
>
> If a LC panel holds a portion of the liquid crystal in the coherent state
> (black on screen) the liquid crystal material can temporarily develop a
> tendency to stay in a more organized manner than normal. Thus long term
> black on a LC display may create an area which holds a persistent image
> effect that looks like a phosphor burn. Fortunately, if the LC panel is
> allowed to be quiescent (off) for an extended time, perhaps one or two
> days,
> the liquid crystal regains its normal characteristics. The effect reverses
> and the apparent "wear" or "burn" goes away. Another mechanism I've run
> across, but haven't verified, is a temporary charge problem on the driving
> transistors. Again leaving the panel off corrects the problem."
>
> ------
>
> For antenna's, there are probably many that will work well, but the
> Channel
> Master 4228 has been a good pick in my locale. If you have VHF
> requirements, note that the 4228 is a UHF only antenna. (Works fine for
> me
> down to about channel 5 in my area)
>
>
!