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Domain users

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Anonymous
November 29, 2004 12:34:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the Domain Controller. I have a Windows
XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as a Domain User. But in Windows XP I
am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but I'd like them to have at least some
modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a domain setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want can happen? Thanks.

--
George Hester
_________________________________

More about : domain users

Anonymous
November 29, 2004 6:20:34 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package] or
can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they can
be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which does
not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below for
more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which basically
involves creating a share called a software distribution point where you put
the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy so
that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages which
can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show as a
desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve

http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/...

"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the Domain
Controller. I have a Windows
XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as a
Domain User. But in Windows XP I
am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but I'd
like them to have at least some
modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a domain
setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want can
happen? Thanks.

--
George Hester
_________________________________
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 6:20:35 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The XP user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were faced with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.

So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install anything on their machines? Great.

--
George Hester
________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
> As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package] or
> can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
> publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
> updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they can
> be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which does
> not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below for
> more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which basically
> involves creating a share called a software distribution point where you put
> the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy so
> that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages which
> can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show as a
> desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
> associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/...
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the Domain
> Controller. I have a Windows
> XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as a
> Domain User. But in Windows XP I
> am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
> Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
> Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but I'd
> like them to have at least some
> modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a domain
> setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
> white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want can
> happen? Thanks.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _________________________________
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 8:15:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

As a regular user they will not be able to install much of anything. If
Group Policy software installation does not work for you, try adding the
domain users account to the power users group on their local machine which
may allow them to install the software without being a local
administrator. --- Steve


"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uEdxXAe1EHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The XP
user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were faced
with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of
Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.

So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install anything
on their machines? Great.

--
George Hester
________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
> As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package] or
> can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
> publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
> updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they
> can
> be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which does
> not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below for
> more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which
> basically
> involves creating a share called a software distribution point where you
> put
> the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy so
> that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages which
> can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show as a
> desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
> associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/...
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the Domain
> Controller. I have a Windows
> XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as a
> Domain User. But in Windows XP I
> am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
> Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
> Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but
> I'd
> like them to have at least some
> modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a
> domain
> setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
> white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want can
> happen? Thanks.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _________________________________
>
>
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 8:15:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Thanks I'll see what can be done in that regard. Actually I don't want them
to be able to install much it's either everything or nothing it seems.

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
news:2PIqd.174658$R05.91402@attbi_s53...
> As a regular user they will not be able to install much of anything. If
> Group Policy software installation does not work for you, try adding the
> domain users account to the power users group on their local machine which
> may allow them to install the software without being a local
> administrator. --- Steve
>
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uEdxXAe1EHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The XP
> user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were
faced
> with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of
> Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.
>
> So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install anything
> on their machines? Great.
>
> --
> George Hester
> ________________________________
> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
> > As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package]
or
> > can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
> > publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
> > updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they
> > can
> > be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which
does
> > not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below for
> > more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which
> > basically
> > involves creating a share called a software distribution point where you
> > put
> > the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy
so
> > that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages
which
> > can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show as
a
> > desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
> > associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve
> >
> >
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/....
asp
> >
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the
Domain
> > Controller. I have a Windows
> > XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as
a
> > Domain User. But in Windows XP I
> > am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
> > Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
> > Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but
> > I'd
> > like them to have at least some
> > modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a
> > domain
> > setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
> > white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want can
> > happen? Thanks.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _________________________________
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 1:58:12 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Hi Steve. I think I got it. See I called the user on the Windows XP the
same name as I called it in the Domain Windows 2000 ADV Server. But signing
in on either of those two resulted in access denied issues even though the
local user in XP was part of the Administrators group. It turns out I had
this wrong but I can tell you the wizards in XP did not help. The reason
being when I tried Locations to point to the domain I was only getting local
groups on the Local machine. I have still not figured out how to get the
groups in the domain to show on the client. But instead what I did is just
type it in domain\user in XP. That worked. So now I have a user in the
domain who has Admin rights on the client. That is just a DoimainUser.
Nothing more. But the user is an Admin on the Local machine Windows XP.
That's good enough for what I wanted to do right now. I still would like to
get a list of the Groups in the domain on the client but that's just not
happening. It was a cinch in Windows 98.

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
news:2PIqd.174658$R05.91402@attbi_s53...
> As a regular user they will not be able to install much of anything. If
> Group Policy software installation does not work for you, try adding the
> domain users account to the power users group on their local machine which
> may allow them to install the software without being a local
> administrator. --- Steve
>
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uEdxXAe1EHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The XP
> user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were
faced
> with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of
> Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.
>
> So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install anything
> on their machines? Great.
>
> --
> George Hester
> ________________________________
> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
> > As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package]
or
> > can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
> > publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
> > updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they
> > can
> > be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which
does
> > not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below for
> > more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which
> > basically
> > involves creating a share called a software distribution point where you
> > put
> > the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy
so
> > that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages
which
> > can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show as
a
> > desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
> > associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve
> >
> >
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/....
asp
> >
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the
Domain
> > Controller. I have a Windows
> > XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as
a
> > Domain User. But in Windows XP I
> > am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
> > Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
> > Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but
> > I'd
> > like them to have at least some
> > modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a
> > domain
> > setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
> > white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want can
> > happen? Thanks.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _________________________________
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 7:54:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

The procedure to add groups is a bit different for XP that W2K for sure.
When you try to add a group you will see a box for "locations" where you
should be able to select the domain. It may help to make sure you logon to
the computer as a domain user when you try to do such. If you have tried
this and do not see the domain in the locations make sure your dns
configuration is correct in the domain, in that the first domain controller
point only to itself as it's preferred dns server and as shown by ipconfig
/all and that the other domain controllers point to the first domain
controller and then themselves as their preferred dns server. Domain client
operating systems W2K and XP Pro MUST point only to Active Directory domain
controllers as their preferred dns server. Also use the support tool netdiag
on first the domain controller and then your XP Pro domain computer to make
sure no errors are reported for dns, dc discovery, trust/secure channel, or
kerberos. Problems such as those could cause the domain groups to not show
in the list of available groups on your domain computer. --- Steve

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb%3Ben-... -- AD
dns FAQ.
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyi...
-- netdiag.

"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uL1cRDp1EHA.2624@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> Hi Steve. I think I got it. See I called the user on the Windows XP the
> same name as I called it in the Domain Windows 2000 ADV Server. But
> signing
> in on either of those two resulted in access denied issues even though the
> local user in XP was part of the Administrators group. It turns out I had
> this wrong but I can tell you the wizards in XP did not help. The reason
> being when I tried Locations to point to the domain I was only getting
> local
> groups on the Local machine. I have still not figured out how to get the
> groups in the domain to show on the client. But instead what I did is
> just
> type it in domain\user in XP. That worked. So now I have a user in the
> domain who has Admin rights on the client. That is just a DoimainUser.
> Nothing more. But the user is an Admin on the Local machine Windows XP.
> That's good enough for what I wanted to do right now. I still would like
> to
> get a list of the Groups in the domain on the client but that's just not
> happening. It was a cinch in Windows 98.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _________________________________
> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:2PIqd.174658$R05.91402@attbi_s53...
>> As a regular user they will not be able to install much of anything. If
>> Group Policy software installation does not work for you, try adding the
>> domain users account to the power users group on their local machine
>> which
>> may allow them to install the software without being a local
>> administrator. --- Steve
>>
>>
>> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:uEdxXAe1EHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The XP
>> user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were
> faced
>> with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of
>> Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.
>>
>> So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install
>> anything
>> on their machines? Great.
>>
>> --
>> George Hester
>> ________________________________
>> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
>> > As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package]
> or
>> > can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
>> > publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
>> > updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they
>> > can
>> > be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which
> does
>> > not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below
>> > for
>> > more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which
>> > basically
>> > involves creating a share called a software distribution point where
>> > you
>> > put
>> > the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy
> so
>> > that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages
> which
>> > can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show
>> > as
> a
>> > desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
>> > associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve
>> >
>> >
> http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/....
> asp
>> >
>> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> > news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> > I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the
> Domain
>> > Controller. I have a Windows
>> > XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as
> a
>> > Domain User. But in Windows XP I
>> > am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
>> > Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
>> > Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but
>> > I'd
>> > like them to have at least some
>> > modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a
>> > domain
>> > setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
>> > white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want
>> > can
>> > happen? Thanks.
>> >
>> > --
>> > George Hester
>> > _________________________________
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 5:42:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Thanks Steve I think you provided the answer to my issues. I have Domain issues off and on. Works fine one moment not the next. I am going to follow your comments to the letter and see if I can't get this thing behaving right.

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message news:x2Tqd.177043$R05.112694@attbi_s53...
> The procedure to add groups is a bit different for XP that W2K for sure.
> When you try to add a group you will see a box for "locations" where you
> should be able to select the domain. It may help to make sure you logon to
> the computer as a domain user when you try to do such. If you have tried
> this and do not see the domain in the locations make sure your dns
> configuration is correct in the domain, in that the first domain controller
> point only to itself as it's preferred dns server and as shown by ipconfig
> /all and that the other domain controllers point to the first domain
> controller and then themselves as their preferred dns server. Domain client
> operating systems W2K and XP Pro MUST point only to Active Directory domain
> controllers as their preferred dns server. Also use the support tool netdiag
> on first the domain controller and then your XP Pro domain computer to make
> sure no errors are reported for dns, dc discovery, trust/secure channel, or
> kerberos. Problems such as those could cause the domain groups to not show
> in the list of available groups on your domain computer. --- Steve
>
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb%3Ben-... -- AD
> dns FAQ.
> http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyi...
> -- netdiag.
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uL1cRDp1EHA.2624@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> > Hi Steve. I think I got it. See I called the user on the Windows XP the
> > same name as I called it in the Domain Windows 2000 ADV Server. But
> > signing
> > in on either of those two resulted in access denied issues even though the
> > local user in XP was part of the Administrators group. It turns out I had
> > this wrong but I can tell you the wizards in XP did not help. The reason
> > being when I tried Locations to point to the domain I was only getting
> > local
> > groups on the Local machine. I have still not figured out how to get the
> > groups in the domain to show on the client. But instead what I did is
> > just
> > type it in domain\user in XP. That worked. So now I have a user in the
> > domain who has Admin rights on the client. That is just a DoimainUser.
> > Nothing more. But the user is an Admin on the Local machine Windows XP.
> > That's good enough for what I wanted to do right now. I still would like
> > to
> > get a list of the Groups in the domain on the client but that's just not
> > happening. It was a cinch in Windows 98.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _________________________________
> > "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:2PIqd.174658$R05.91402@attbi_s53...
> >> As a regular user they will not be able to install much of anything. If
> >> Group Policy software installation does not work for you, try adding the
> >> domain users account to the power users group on their local machine
> >> which
> >> may allow them to install the software without being a local
> >> administrator. --- Steve
> >>
> >>
> >> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> news:uEdxXAe1EHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The XP
> >> user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were
> > faced
> >> with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of
> >> Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.
> >>
> >> So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install
> >> anything
> >> on their machines? Great.
> >>
> >> --
> >> George Hester
> >> ________________________________
> >> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> >> news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
> >> > As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package]
> > or
> >> > can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
> >> > publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
> >> > updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they
> >> > can
> >> > be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which
> > does
> >> > not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below
> >> > for
> >> > more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which
> >> > basically
> >> > involves creating a share called a software distribution point where
> >> > you
> >> > put
> >> > the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy
> > so
> >> > that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages
> > which
> >> > can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show
> >> > as
> > a
> >> > desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
> >> > associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve
> >> >
> >> >
> > http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/....
> > asp
> >> >
> >> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> > news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> > I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the
> > Domain
> >> > Controller. I have a Windows
> >> > XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as
> > a
> >> > Domain User. But in Windows XP I
> >> > am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
> >> > Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
> >> > Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but
> >> > I'd
> >> > like them to have at least some
> >> > modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a
> >> > domain
> >> > setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
> >> > white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want
> >> > can
> >> > happen? Thanks.
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > George Hester
> >> > _________________________________
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 6:28:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Yeah buddy. I think you got it. I really don't think this is as hard as it looks at first. I'm new to this and so
even though something works it may not be the right thing. Then after a while when it isn't, ISSUES start to
appear. And believe me I had (have) ISSUES.

I knew what to do after you said what you said and I went ahead and did it. I put the Windows XP client at its
static IP address (that is provided by the Router) and set its TCP\IP properties to look to my Domain Controller
for the DNS Server. All done in the Local Administrator account of course after I put everything back to
WORKGROUP properties.

It's funny because all the icons chnaged after I put it in the Domain. I had real icons signifying various Domain
properties whereas before I think I had a mixture of WORKGROUP and Domain icons.

Now when I go to Locations... I see Entire Directory not the Local Machine's name. So I think that's right. It
wasn't all for nought though. The Domain users I had in it when it wasn't right are still OK and the one I set as a
User in the Domain and an Administrator in Windows XP still has all its Properties. Thanks Microsoft and you too Steve.

Now I just got to get that dang USB Printer on the Domain Server to work in the client....

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message news:x2Tqd.177043$R05.112694@attbi_s53...
> The procedure to add groups is a bit different for XP that W2K for sure.
> When you try to add a group you will see a box for "locations" where you
> should be able to select the domain. It may help to make sure you logon to
> the computer as a domain user when you try to do such. If you have tried
> this and do not see the domain in the locations make sure your dns
> configuration is correct in the domain, in that the first domain controller
> point only to itself as it's preferred dns server and as shown by ipconfig
> /all and that the other domain controllers point to the first domain
> controller and then themselves as their preferred dns server. Domain client
> operating systems W2K and XP Pro MUST point only to Active Directory domain
> controllers as their preferred dns server. Also use the support tool netdiag
> on first the domain controller and then your XP Pro domain computer to make
> sure no errors are reported for dns, dc discovery, trust/secure channel, or
> kerberos. Problems such as those could cause the domain groups to not show
> in the list of available groups on your domain computer. --- Steve
>
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb%3Ben-... -- AD
> dns FAQ.
> http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyi...
> -- netdiag.
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uL1cRDp1EHA.2624@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> > Hi Steve. I think I got it. See I called the user on the Windows XP the
> > same name as I called it in the Domain Windows 2000 ADV Server. But
> > signing
> > in on either of those two resulted in access denied issues even though the
> > local user in XP was part of the Administrators group. It turns out I had
> > this wrong but I can tell you the wizards in XP did not help. The reason
> > being when I tried Locations to point to the domain I was only getting
> > local
> > groups on the Local machine. I have still not figured out how to get the
> > groups in the domain to show on the client. But instead what I did is
> > just
> > type it in domain\user in XP. That worked. So now I have a user in the
> > domain who has Admin rights on the client. That is just a DoimainUser.
> > Nothing more. But the user is an Admin on the Local machine Windows XP.
> > That's good enough for what I wanted to do right now. I still would like
> > to
> > get a list of the Groups in the domain on the client but that's just not
> > happening. It was a cinch in Windows 98.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _________________________________
> > "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:2PIqd.174658$R05.91402@attbi_s53...
> >> As a regular user they will not be able to install much of anything. If
> >> Group Policy software installation does not work for you, try adding the
> >> domain users account to the power users group on their local machine
> >> which
> >> may allow them to install the software without being a local
> >> administrator. --- Steve
> >>
> >>
> >> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> news:uEdxXAe1EHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The XP
> >> user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were
> > faced
> >> with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of
> >> Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.
> >>
> >> So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install
> >> anything
> >> on their machines? Great.
> >>
> >> --
> >> George Hester
> >> ________________________________
> >> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> >> news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
> >> > As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer Package]
> > or
> >> > can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign or
> >> > publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you have
> >> > updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates, they
> >> > can
> >> > be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which
> > does
> >> > not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below
> >> > for
> >> > more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which
> >> > basically
> >> > involves creating a share called a software distribution point where
> >> > you
> >> > put
> >> > the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group Policy
> > so
> >> > that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages
> > which
> >> > can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show
> >> > as
> > a
> >> > desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
> >> > associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. --- Steve
> >> >
> >> >
> > http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/....
> > asp
> >> >
> >> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> > news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> > I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the
> > Domain
> >> > Controller. I have a Windows
> >> > XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K as
> > a
> >> > Domain User. But in Windows XP I
> >> > am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install an
> >> > Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
> >> > Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users but
> >> > I'd
> >> > like them to have at least some
> >> > modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a
> >> > domain
> >> > setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
> >> > white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want
> >> > can
> >> > happen? Thanks.
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > George Hester
> >> > _________________________________
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 1:29:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Ok George. It sounds like you are making good progress. Proper dns
configuration is a must in an Active Directory domain. I think you will find
things in general work better now. --- Steve

"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23uIwYsx1EHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Yeah buddy. I think you got it. I really don't think this is as hard as it
looks at first. I'm new to this and so
even though something works it may not be the right thing. Then after a
while when it isn't, ISSUES start to
appear. And believe me I had (have) ISSUES.

I knew what to do after you said what you said and I went ahead and did it.
I put the Windows XP client at its
static IP address (that is provided by the Router) and set its TCP\IP
properties to look to my Domain Controller
for the DNS Server. All done in the Local Administrator account of course
after I put everything back to
WORKGROUP properties.

It's funny because all the icons chnaged after I put it in the Domain. I
had real icons signifying various Domain
properties whereas before I think I had a mixture of WORKGROUP and Domain
icons.

Now when I go to Locations... I see Entire Directory not the Local Machine's
name. So I think that's right. It
wasn't all for nought though. The Domain users I had in it when it wasn't
right are still OK and the one I set as a
User in the Domain and an Administrator in Windows XP still has all its
Properties. Thanks Microsoft and you too Steve.

Now I just got to get that dang USB Printer on the Domain Server to work in
the client....

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
news:x2Tqd.177043$R05.112694@attbi_s53...
> The procedure to add groups is a bit different for XP that W2K for sure.
> When you try to add a group you will see a box for "locations" where you
> should be able to select the domain. It may help to make sure you logon to
> the computer as a domain user when you try to do such. If you have tried
> this and do not see the domain in the locations make sure your dns
> configuration is correct in the domain, in that the first domain
> controller
> point only to itself as it's preferred dns server and as shown by
> ipconfig
> /all and that the other domain controllers point to the first domain
> controller and then themselves as their preferred dns server. Domain
> client
> operating systems W2K and XP Pro MUST point only to Active Directory
> domain
> controllers as their preferred dns server. Also use the support tool
> netdiag
> on first the domain controller and then your XP Pro domain computer to
> make
> sure no errors are reported for dns, dc discovery, trust/secure channel,
> or
> kerberos. Problems such as those could cause the domain groups to not show
> in the list of available groups on your domain computer. --- Steve
>
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb%3Ben-... -- AD
> dns FAQ.
> http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyi...
> -- netdiag.
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uL1cRDp1EHA.2624@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> > Hi Steve. I think I got it. See I called the user on the Windows XP
> > the
> > same name as I called it in the Domain Windows 2000 ADV Server. But
> > signing
> > in on either of those two resulted in access denied issues even though
> > the
> > local user in XP was part of the Administrators group. It turns out I
> > had
> > this wrong but I can tell you the wizards in XP did not help. The
> > reason
> > being when I tried Locations to point to the domain I was only getting
> > local
> > groups on the Local machine. I have still not figured out how to get
> > the
> > groups in the domain to show on the client. But instead what I did is
> > just
> > type it in domain\user in XP. That worked. So now I have a user in the
> > domain who has Admin rights on the client. That is just a DoimainUser.
> > Nothing more. But the user is an Admin on the Local machine Windows XP.
> > That's good enough for what I wanted to do right now. I still would
> > like
> > to
> > get a list of the Groups in the domain on the client but that's just not
> > happening. It was a cinch in Windows 98.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _________________________________
> > "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:2PIqd.174658$R05.91402@attbi_s53...
> >> As a regular user they will not be able to install much of anything. If
> >> Group Policy software installation does not work for you, try adding
> >> the
> >> domain users account to the power users group on their local machine
> >> which
> >> may allow them to install the software without being a local
> >> administrator. --- Steve
> >>
> >>
> >> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> news:uEdxXAe1EHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> Hmmm. Well actually I dont't know what the install file type is. The
> >> XP
> >> user wanted to use Windows Messenger in Windows XP. Doing so we were
> > faced
> >> with a update message. We at first said, 'No" and that was the end of
> >> Windows Messenger. So we diecided to say, "yes." Installation Denied.
> >>
> >> So I guess there is no way to allow a user in a Domain to install
> >> anything
> >> on their machines? Great.
> >>
> >> --
> >> George Hester
> >> ________________________________
> >> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> >> news:6Awqd.579942$mD.423479@attbi_s02...
> >> > As long as the installs are .msi packages [ Windows Installer
> >> > Package]
> > or
> >> > can be converted to .msi packages you can use Group Policy to assign
> >> > or
> >> > publish software to users or assign software to computers. If you
> >> > have
> >> > updates from Windows Updates that are considered critical updates,
> >> > they
> >> > can
> >> > be installed using Automatic Updates install by schedule option which
> > does
> >> > not require that the user be local administrator. See the link below
> >> > for
> >> > more info on using Group Policy to manage software installs which
> >> > basically
> >> > involves creating a share called a software distribution point where
> >> > you
> >> > put
> >> > the .msi packages you want to deploy and then configuring Group
> >> > Policy
> > so
> >> > that the proper users or computers have access to the .msi packages
> > which
> >> > can be installed automatically, show in add and remove programs, show
> >> > as
> > a
> >> > desktop shortcut, or are installed first time a user tries to access
> >> > associated file such as a .doc file which would install Word. ---
> >> > Steve
> >> >
> >> >
> > http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/planning/....
> > asp
> >> >
> >> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> > news:o TUhEwb1EHA.1860@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> > I just set up a Domain using Windows 2000 Advance Server SP3 as the
> > Domain
> >> > Controller. I have a Windows
> >> > XP client. They use a logon to the domain that I have in Windows 2K
> >> > as
> > a
> >> > Domain User. But in Windows XP I
> >> > am finding much that is denied to the user. They needed to install
> >> > an
> >> > Updated Windows Messenger and doing so
> >> > Error Access denied. Now I'd like to keep the logon in Doman Users
> >> > but
> >> > I'd
> >> > like them to have at least some
> >> > modicum of istall priviledges. Can you tell me how this is done in a
> >> > domain
> >> > setting or maybe suggest a Microsoft
> >> > white paper that discusses how to set up Group Policy so what I want
> >> > can
> >> > happen? Thanks.
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > George Hester
> >> > _________________________________
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 4:43:07 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Alot better. The domain is not coming and going like it was before. The
WORKGROUP disappeared from the My Network Places also. Is there any way to
view and pass to files on the client without making their root a share? And
vice-versa?

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
news:bv6rd.591409$mD.411458@attbi_s02...
> Ok George. It sounds like you are making good progress. Proper dns
> configuration is a must in an Active Directory domain. I think you will
find
> things in general work better now. --- Steve
>
<snip>
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 8:22:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

As long as you have administrator access to any computer you can use the
administrative hidden shares if I understand what you want to do. For
instance use \\computername\c$ in the run box to access remote computer
hidden administrative share. This assumes that file and print sharing is
enabled on the target computer. --- Steve


"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23jorFE31EHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Alot better. The domain is not coming and going like it was before. The
> WORKGROUP disappeared from the My Network Places also. Is there any way
> to
> view and pass to files on the client without making their root a share?
> And
> vice-versa?
>
> --
> George Hester
> _________________________________
> "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:bv6rd.591409$mD.411458@attbi_s02...
>> Ok George. It sounds like you are making good progress. Proper dns
>> configuration is a must in an Active Directory domain. I think you will
> find
>> things in general work better now. --- Steve
>>
> <snip>
>
>
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 7:16:12 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy (More info?)

Nice. Thanks.

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message news:o 5nrd.427471$wV.147562@attbi_s54...
> As long as you have administrator access to any computer you can use the
> administrative hidden shares if I understand what you want to do. For
> instance use \\computername\c$ in the run box to access remote computer
> hidden administrative share. This assumes that file and print sharing is
> enabled on the target computer. --- Steve
>
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:%23jorFE31EHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > Alot better. The domain is not coming and going like it was before. The
> > WORKGROUP disappeared from the My Network Places also. Is there any way
> > to
> > view and pass to files on the client without making their root a share?
> > And
> > vice-versa?
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _________________________________
> > "Steven L Umbach" <n9rou@n0-spam-for-me-comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:bv6rd.591409$mD.411458@attbi_s02...
> >> Ok George. It sounds like you are making good progress. Proper dns
> >> configuration is a must in an Active Directory domain. I think you will
> > find
> >> things in general work better now. --- Steve
> >>
> > <snip>
> >
> >
>
>
!