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Partitioning OS and Games

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January 24, 2007 3:13:40 AM

I'm getting a seagate 320gb. How do I partition them to capture the full potential of the drive. Heard somewhere that I'm supposed to have 3 Partions, one for OS, Games & Apps, Scratch disk for Video, Photo editing. Is this the right set-up?

More about : partitioning games

January 24, 2007 3:43:16 AM

Yes indeed that will work fine.Try to leave the os partition at around 20gigs and then partition the rest of the drive into 2 or even 3 more partitions.Put all your games in the partition next to your os partition and then software and movies as needed in the other partitions.Goodluck.

Dahak

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January 24, 2007 11:32:43 AM

There is an advantage to this method right? like a faster boot time and stuff
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January 24, 2007 12:10:03 PM

Quote:
There is an advantage to this method right? like a faster boot time and stuff


Performance improvement is negligible at best. It's more for organization and the added benefit that you may not fill up the drive with your OS on it. Honestly, I'd leave it as one partition and move on.
January 24, 2007 12:32:52 PM

Quote:
There is an advantage to this method right? like a faster boot time and stuff


Performance improvement is negligible at best. It's more for organization and the added benefit that you may not fill up the drive with your OS on it. Honestly, I'd leave it as one partition and move on.

You need to take into consideration what each partition will be doing from a r\w seek\access perspective. You have the general idea down, but your design idea is useless from the added performance angle. Typically you are segregating the OS, Page File, and storage off in partitions. This leave the OS partition r\w and access time to breath. But loading the drive mechanically the way you are will do nothing. I suggest getting a raptor for your OS, PF, and editing. Then offload your work to the 350. Games will not have a greater impact with designed partitioning. So buy Raptor, or just use a two partitions for organization.
January 24, 2007 12:49:51 PM

2 Partition it is, so OS 20gb Partition, and a partition for the rest for programs + games.
January 24, 2007 1:02:21 PM

HI!
I usually do it this way:
The OS partition = 8 gigs, that's enough for win xp, photoshop, illustrator, nero and all the other useful programs :)  (I store documents on a different partition)
another partition is about 20 gigs (for temporary files or downloaded stuff, until I sort out stuff my torrent client downloads when I'm either sleeping or at work).
The rest is divided between games, music, video, dvd on hd, anime, work (although the heavy things like dvd on hd, video and anime are on other hdds, thank god I got 750 gigs worth of space)
I always have a ghost of my system partition lying around, in case something happens, that way I can restore my system within 10 minutes (and since I have my docs and everything else on other partitions, I'm never sorry about my xp install dying on me)
January 24, 2007 1:14:04 PM

From a performance standpoint, there is no real advantage to seperate partitions (as others have stated), because your still having to hit the same platter and go over the same IDE/SATA cables. The only reasons you would seperate your partitions out like that was for fragmentation purposes (putting the pagefile on its own partition can keep up from fragmenting up the rest of your disk or vice versa) or for recovery purposes (if a partition goes south, and yet the drive is still happy, the other partitions should in theory be ok). Partitions are less and less important these days in the workstation environment though. I'd say cut it up from an organizational point of view if you want, or snag two seperate drives (one big one for data that can be slower, and a smaller, faster one for the OS that can help bootup times), but your not really gonna hurt yourself if you make it all one big partition.
January 24, 2007 1:36:08 PM

Now that's an excellent idea. I forgot about that. Get a WD raptor for your system partition and stuff you want to have fast access to and another slower, but larger hdd for music etc (access time won't matter that much)
P.S.: the latest WD raptors are sataII, so your MB must support it.
P.S.2: putting the swap file on a dedicated partition, as suggested above, is also a good idea (which I've been using for the last couple of years myself :wink: )
January 24, 2007 1:49:54 PM

I typically leave windows with 20 gigs for it and some programs. I always put my games, pictures, and important documents in their own partition just in case I have to do an O/S reload at any point. Right now I could reload the O/S and not have to reinstall a singe game :D 
January 24, 2007 3:37:17 PM

Quote:
I typically leave windows with 20 gigs for it and some programs. I always put my games, pictures, and important documents in their own partition just in case I have to do an O/S reload at any point. Right now I could reload the O/S and not have to reinstall a singe game :D 
I have a similar partition setup, 20 gigs for OS, 3 gig for page file and the rest for games/apps/storage.

After reloading the OS (I'm assuming this to be an OS partition reformat and clean install), how are your games/apps usable without a reinstall? Aren't there registry entries or system file updates that the games/apps need?

I ask because I have done just that ... reinstalled my OS, but I also then reinstall all my apps/games. Obviously, this is unavoidable with some apps (anti-virus etc) that require system integration. I guess I'm answering my own question ... some apps (in particular games?) don't require integration into the system and can simply "run".

Have you actually done an OS reload? Which games (or apps) run without a reinstall??
January 24, 2007 4:04:05 PM

No KISS fans I see.
January 24, 2007 4:08:10 PM

Why 20 gigs? all of this fits on a 8 gig drive^
NOD32 with all updates
all mobo drivers, sound drivers etc drivers
Latest directx redistr
Klite codec pack
Corel draw
Abbyy finereader
Acdsee
Acronis truimage
Adobe photoshop
Adobe illustrator
Seti@home
Cyberlink powerDVD
R-studio – network edition
Nero6 ultra edition
Microtorrent
Winamp surround
Windows media player classic (alt to quicktime)
And of course win xp :-)
Who needs a swapfile anyway? With 4 gigs of ram, like my PC, switch it off or shift it to SSD
January 24, 2007 4:33:25 PM

Yes, OS in first partition
Games on 2nd
Data on 3rd.

Why:

If OS gets damaged -> format c:\ and install, no data lost

If you have Games and data on same disk, having a lot of data files being modified will make a pain to defrag the drive.

If you have sperated games/data, you install your games and then defrag, then you dont need to defrag a lot and game load times will be better than if you have a very fragmented drive because fo documents gettings in the way...

The best will be to have more than 1 hdd tho...

p.d.
MOO!
January 24, 2007 4:40:31 PM

:lol: 
January 24, 2007 4:51:52 PM

Quote:
Why 20 gigs?
It's a nice round number.
It does allow for a big temp folder (MY temp stuff ... not system temp stuff) and extra space to lessen fragmentation. It wasn't really a number I calculated out.

Quote:
Who needs a swapfile anyway? With 4 gigs of ram, like my PC, switch it off or shift it to SSD
:twisted: envy :twisted:
Those of us with only 1 gig of ram still need a swap file, plus I remember reading somewhere (reliable source but no reference available 8O ) that windows runs better with a swap file, even if it's a small one, regardless of the amount of physical ram.
January 24, 2007 5:01:29 PM

The point of me saying "who needs a swapfile anyway" was: switch it off, defrag another partition, switch it to that partition
Don't envy me: my PC is old (december 2005 birthday)
January 24, 2007 5:06:08 PM

One performance issue not discussed thus far is the FAT/MFT.
Larger partition = larger FAT/MFT = slower lookup of file locations on disc.
From this perspective, smaller partitions = better performance.

Having said that, I have no idea if the performance difference is noticable or significant. :?
January 24, 2007 5:50:59 PM

Quote:
Yes, OS in first partition
Games on 2nd
Data on 3rd.

Why:

If OS gets damaged -> format c:\ and install, no data lost

If you have Games and data on same disk, having a lot of data files being modified will make a pain to defrag the drive.

If you have sperated games/data, you install your games and then defrag, then you dont need to defrag a lot and game load times will be better than if you have a very fragmented drive because fo documents gettings in the way...

The best will be to have more than 1 hdd tho...

p.d.
MOO!


I think Holy_Cow is right. In my opinion the main reason to have Windows on a seperate partion is that when you have to reinstall...which you will have to sooner or later...you can reload on the small partition and all your saved games/data/etc... are safe. I only use 2 partitions one for OS the other for data/software, but I also have a second drive for backup.
January 24, 2007 5:53:06 PM

Typically I would allocate 20GB for OS, 20GB for swap & documents, balance for games, music, photos etc. I also don't allow sharing of OS partions across my network.
January 24, 2007 6:24:56 PM

Quote:
The point of me saying "who needs a swapfile anyway" was: switch it off, defrag another partition, switch it to that partition
Sorry, I'm not really following you here. I think you are saying either:
1) move the swap file to it's own partition
2) move the swap file to a freshly defragged partition
3) something else I've missed altogether

Quote:
Don't envy me: my PC is old (december 2005 birthday)
The envy stays ... my PC is from Feb. 2005. :p 
January 24, 2007 8:31:42 PM

Quote:
Quote:

Have you actually done an OS reload? Which games (or apps) run without a reinstall??


Some games do, and some don't. All of my steam games continue to play, as well as some of my other games. At least in doing it this way, upon re-installing, many games will retain my saved data (game saves and such).

I mainly do it for my steam games, I hate having to wait 10 hours to download Counter-Strike: Source.... lol
January 25, 2007 2:02:07 PM

Quote:

Have you actually done an OS reload? Which games (or apps) run without a reinstall??


Some games do, and some don't. All of my steam games continue to play, as well as some of my other games. At least in doing it this way, upon re-installing, many games will retain my saved data (game saves and such).

I mainly do it for my steam games, I hate having to wait 10 hours to download Counter-Strike: Source.... lol
Thanks for the info. I totally agree. World of Warcraft is the same way with downloading the updates after a reinstall. (although I haven't tried running WoW without a re-install, at least I won't need to download the updates again :D  )

And just for the record, saved games are the main reason I keep the game install directory on a non-OS partition.
January 26, 2007 12:46:52 AM

I was just looking into this myself. I thought there was some great information here:

http://partition.radified.com/

Another tip I read somewhere was to put the page file on a seperate drive so read/writes can happen to OS and page file at the same time.
January 29, 2007 5:27:25 PM

Quote:
Now that's an excellent idea. I forgot about that. Get a WD raptor for your system partition and stuff you want to have fast access to and another slower, but larger hdd for music etc (access time won't matter that much)
P.S.: the latest WD raptors are sataII, so your MB must support it.
P.S.2: putting the swap file on a dedicated partition, as suggested above, is also a good idea (which I've been using for the last couple of years myself :wink: )


Incorrect. All raptors are SATA 150. WD hasn't put out any SATA 300 drives just yet. :-)

-- MaSoP
February 1, 2007 6:19:49 PM

Here's my question, don't some games (or most) only let you installed them on the C: Drive? And don't you have to delete the games and programs you have on the other partitions when you re-install the OS since they don't comply with the Registry???
February 2, 2007 4:53:43 PM

I stand corrected, my fault, all Raptors out there are SO far sataI. (though there are WD SATAII drives out there, they aren't raptors though...) Jeez, this reminds me of when I was running my Pc with SCSI hdds and a plextor CDburner back in 95...
In reply to Gremlin: Got a bit confused, too much in my mind (3 exams passed and 2 to go at that time at my uni), what I meant was either switch it off or move it to a freshly defragged partition.
!