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creating a start disk on a usb memory stick

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Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 8:57:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi everyone
I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was wondering if
anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it can be
done???

More about : creating start disk usb memory stick

Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 12:43:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi, Newb.

A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer! The last
computer I had without a disk drive was my original TRS-80, back in 1977,
which loaded from a music cassette; we got floppy drives the next year and
hard drives for our IBM and compatible PCs in the mid-80s, and I haven't
seen a diskless PC since then. Do you mean your computer has no CD/DVD
drives?

What make and model computer do you have? Is it on a network? Tell us more
about that.

To make a PC bootable from a USB memory stick, you must have support for USB
and that memory stick built into the computer's BIOS - the small amount of
memory that is not forgotten when the power is turned off - the part that
tells the computer how to start and load everything else, including the
parts that load and start Windows. So far as I know, there is no computer
on the market - yet -with that much capability in the BIOS. Today's PCs can
use USB until it has loaded the USB drivers, so we have a chicken-and-egg
problem in trying to boot from any kind of USB hardware.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
rc@corridor.net
Microsoft Windows MVP

"The Newb" <The Newb@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:B6F16F91-10F9-4D9C-97BC-B264BFBB6235@microsoft.com...
> Hi everyone
> I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was wondering
> if
> anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it can
> be
> done???
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 5:39:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

By 'disk drive' do you mean floppy drive?
Or no floppy, cd, or hard drive of any kind?

--
Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
(Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
"The Newb" <The Newb@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:B6F16F91-10F9-4D9C-97BC-B264BFBB6235@microsoft.com...
> Hi everyone
> I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was wondering
> if
> anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it can
> be
> done???
Related resources
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 6:57:40 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

While certainly not the norm it is no longer unusual for new systems to ship
without a floppy drive. This is true for laptops as well as tower or desktop
models. While not common on older systems many new PCs can now boot USB
devices. See the information here
http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=1676
--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"R. C. White" <rc@corridor.net> wrote in message
news:ugV0%23vqEFHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Newb.
>
> A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer! The last
> computer I had without a disk drive was my original TRS-80, back in 1977,
> which loaded from a music cassette; we got floppy drives the next year and
> hard drives for our IBM and compatible PCs in the mid-80s, and I haven't
> seen a diskless PC since then. Do you mean your computer has no CD/DVD
> drives?
>
> What make and model computer do you have? Is it on a network? Tell us
more
> about that.
>
> To make a PC bootable from a USB memory stick, you must have support for
USB
> and that memory stick built into the computer's BIOS - the small amount of
> memory that is not forgotten when the power is turned off - the part that
> tells the computer how to start and load everything else, including the
> parts that load and start Windows. So far as I know, there is no computer
> on the market - yet -with that much capability in the BIOS. Today's PCs
can
> use USB until it has loaded the USB drivers, so we have a chicken-and-egg
> problem in trying to boot from any kind of USB hardware.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@corridor.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
>
> "The Newb" <The Newb@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:B6F16F91-10F9-4D9C-97BC-B264BFBB6235@microsoft.com...
> > Hi everyone
> > I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was wondering
> > if
> > anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it can
> > be
> > done???
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 7:02:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

format the stick and copy the files from a bootable floppy to it. If you
need the files you can download them from www.bootdisk.com

check here for more info
http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=1676

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"The Newb" <The Newb@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:B6F16F91-10F9-4D9C-97BC-B264BFBB6235@microsoft.com...
> Hi everyone
> I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was wondering
if
> anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it can
be
> done???
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 7:51:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"The Newb" <The Newb@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was wondering if
>anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it can be
>done???

Many USB sticks come with a driver disk that also contains a manual or
a software that will help you with this.

--
(tm)
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 8:14:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Actually I just tried it. Use the instructions here
http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleid=1676&p... It works
nicely.


--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"The Newb" <The Newb@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:B6F16F91-10F9-4D9C-97BC-B264BFBB6235@microsoft.com...
> Hi everyone
> I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was wondering
if
> anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it can
be
> done???
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 8:37:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Salut/Hi R. C. White,

le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 09:43:55 -0600, tu disais/you said:-

>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!

I've had several.

Sinclair ZX80
Sinclair ZX81
Sinclair Spectrum ZX64
BBC B
Amstrad CPC 6128
Amstrad PCW 9256

and my first PC.

Grin!

I can - hypothetically - think of several reasons why one might want this.

Imagine that you are a terrorist. If you store information on HD, it can
become evidence to be used against you in trial. Windows is so insecure that
it is practically impossible to use it, without it leaving traces of what
you've been doing lying about. So it might be advisable NOT to have anything
compromising permanently attached to the physical computer you use all the
time. This is especially true in the UK, which has no 5th amendment and
where it is now an absolute offence to refuse to open an encrypted container
when ordered to do so by a law court.

The same reasoning could apply to anyone wanting to use computers for any
other illegal activity.

Imagine you want to use on several (same make and model) machines. If you
could boot all the machines from an identical and transportable drive, then
any machine you use would look and feel the same and your data would travel
with you.

USB sticks are the most secure form of data storage known. A recent
experiment showed them resisting high temperature, low temperature,
corrosive liquids, and mechanical stress (being run over by a car, and shot
from a mortar, even) better than any other storage medium.

--
All the Best
Ian Hoare
http://www.souvigne.com
mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 15, 2005 11:08:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi, Ian.

>>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!
>
> I've had several.
>
> Sinclair ZX80
<snip list>

Yeah, I heard of those - in addition to my own TRS=80s. But those were when
we still called them "microcomputers" or a variety of other names. As I
recall, we didn't call them PCs until IBM introduced its Personal Computer
in 1981 - and it always had a floppy disk drive.

I can imagine a workstation, attached to a network, which might not need a
disk drive of any kind, but I've never had anything but a standalone
computer. "PC", it seems to me, implies standalone capability, even if it
can connect to a network.

I like USB and don't dispute its utility. But booting from USB is a new
idea to me, so I'm learning from this thread. ;<)

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
rc@corridor.net
Microsoft Windows MVP

"Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
news:n5k111p0uq26kgs9ne272pe9ngrb190anm@4ax.com...
> Salut/Hi R. C. White,
>
> le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 09:43:55 -0600, tu disais/you said:-
>
>>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!
>
> I've had several.
>
> Sinclair ZX80
> Sinclair ZX81
> Sinclair Spectrum ZX64
> BBC B
> Amstrad CPC 6128
> Amstrad PCW 9256
>
> and my first PC.
>
> Grin!
>
> I can - hypothetically - think of several reasons why one might want this.
>
> Imagine that you are a terrorist. If you store information on HD, it can
> become evidence to be used against you in trial. Windows is so insecure
> that
> it is practically impossible to use it, without it leaving traces of what
> you've been doing lying about. So it might be advisable NOT to have
> anything
> compromising permanently attached to the physical computer you use all the
> time. This is especially true in the UK, which has no 5th amendment and
> where it is now an absolute offence to refuse to open an encrypted
> container
> when ordered to do so by a law court.
>
> The same reasoning could apply to anyone wanting to use computers for any
> other illegal activity.
>
> Imagine you want to use on several (same make and model) machines. If you
> could boot all the machines from an identical and transportable drive,
> then
> any machine you use would look and feel the same and your data would
> travel
> with you.
>
> USB sticks are the most secure form of data storage known. A recent
> experiment showed them resisting high temperature, low temperature,
> corrosive liquids, and mechanical stress (being run over by a car, and
> shot
> from a mortar, even) better than any other storage medium.
>
> --
> All the Best
> Ian Hoare
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 15, 2005 11:11:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi, Harry.

Thanks for the update on booting from USB.

> While certainly not the norm it is no longer unusual for new systems to
> ship
> without a floppy drive.

But the OP said "a pc without a disk drive", so I interpreted that to mean
with neither HD nor floppy.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
rc@corridor.net
Microsoft Windows MVP

"Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
news:unPN7$tEFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> While certainly not the norm it is no longer unusual for new systems to
> ship
> without a floppy drive. This is true for laptops as well as tower or
> desktop
> models. While not common on older systems many new PCs can now boot USB
> devices. See the information here
> http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=1676
> --
>
> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>
>
> "R. C. White" <rc@corridor.net> wrote in message
> news:ugV0%23vqEFHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Hi, Newb.
>>
>> A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer! The
>> last
>> computer I had without a disk drive was my original TRS-80, back in 1977,
>> which loaded from a music cassette; we got floppy drives the next year
>> and
>> hard drives for our IBM and compatible PCs in the mid-80s, and I haven't
>> seen a diskless PC since then. Do you mean your computer has no CD/DVD
>> drives?
>>
>> What make and model computer do you have? Is it on a network? Tell us
> more
>> about that.
>>
>> To make a PC bootable from a USB memory stick, you must have support for
> USB
>> and that memory stick built into the computer's BIOS - the small amount
>> of
>> memory that is not forgotten when the power is turned off - the part that
>> tells the computer how to start and load everything else, including the
>> parts that load and start Windows. So far as I know, there is no
>> computer
>> on the market - yet -with that much capability in the BIOS. Today's PCs
> can
>> use USB until it has loaded the USB drivers, so we have a chicken-and-egg
>> problem in trying to boot from any kind of USB hardware.
>>
>> RC
>>
>> "The Newb" <The Newb@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:B6F16F91-10F9-4D9C-97BC-B264BFBB6235@microsoft.com...
>> > Hi everyone
>> > I have a problem regarding a pc without a disk drive. So I was
>> > wondering
>> > if
>> > anyone knows how to make a start "disk" on a usb memory stick. If it
>> > can
>> > be
>> > done???
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 15, 2005 12:20:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

A truly Thin Client.

--
Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
(Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
"R. C. White" <rc@corridor.net> wrote in message
news:o k8MVf2EFHA.4004@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Ian.
>
>>>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!
>>
>> I've had several.
>>
>> Sinclair ZX80
> <snip list>
>
> Yeah, I heard of those - in addition to my own TRS=80s. But those were
> when we still called them "microcomputers" or a variety of other names.
> As I recall, we didn't call them PCs until IBM introduced its Personal
> Computer in 1981 - and it always had a floppy disk drive.
>
> I can imagine a workstation, attached to a network, which might not need a
> disk drive of any kind, but I've never had anything but a standalone
> computer. "PC", it seems to me, implies standalone capability, even if it
> can connect to a network.
>
> I like USB and don't dispute its utility. But booting from USB is a new
> idea to me, so I'm learning from this thread. ;<)
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@corridor.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
>
> "Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
> news:n5k111p0uq26kgs9ne272pe9ngrb190anm@4ax.com...
>> Salut/Hi R. C. White,
>>
>> le/on Mon, 14 Feb 2005 09:43:55 -0600, tu disais/you said:-
>>
>>>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!
>>
>> I've had several.
>>
>> Sinclair ZX80
>> Sinclair ZX81
>> Sinclair Spectrum ZX64
>> BBC B
>> Amstrad CPC 6128
>> Amstrad PCW 9256
>>
>> and my first PC.
>>
>> Grin!
>>
>> I can - hypothetically - think of several reasons why one might want
>> this.
>>
>> Imagine that you are a terrorist. If you store information on HD, it can
>> become evidence to be used against you in trial. Windows is so insecure
>> that
>> it is practically impossible to use it, without it leaving traces of what
>> you've been doing lying about. So it might be advisable NOT to have
>> anything
>> compromising permanently attached to the physical computer you use all
>> the
>> time. This is especially true in the UK, which has no 5th amendment and
>> where it is now an absolute offence to refuse to open an encrypted
>> container
>> when ordered to do so by a law court.
>>
>> The same reasoning could apply to anyone wanting to use computers for any
>> other illegal activity.
>>
>> Imagine you want to use on several (same make and model) machines. If you
>> could boot all the machines from an identical and transportable drive,
>> then
>> any machine you use would look and feel the same and your data would
>> travel
>> with you.
>>
>> USB sticks are the most secure form of data storage known. A recent
>> experiment showed them resisting high temperature, low temperature,
>> corrosive liquids, and mechanical stress (being run over by a car, and
>> shot
>> from a mortar, even) better than any other storage medium.
>>
>> --
>> All the Best
>> Ian Hoare
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 16, 2005 5:13:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Salut/Hi R. C. White,

le/on Tue, 15 Feb 2005 08:08:30 -0600, tu disais/you said:-

>Hi, Ian.
>
>>>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!
>>
>> I've had several.
>>
>> Sinclair ZX80
><snip list>
>
>Yeah, I heard of those - in addition to my own TRS=80s. But those were when
>we still called them "microcomputers" or a variety of other names. As I
>recall, we didn't call them PCs until IBM introduced its Personal Computer
>in 1981 - and it always had a floppy disk drive.

Good point. I'd sort of not noticed your "PC" restriction. So strike the
Sinclairs which were never called PCs. The Amstrads were on the other hand,
The CPC 464 was the "Colour Personal Computer" model 4 with 64k of RAM. My
6128 did have a single 3" floppy drive and 128k of RAM.

>I can imagine a workstation, attached to a network, which might not need a
>disk drive of any kind, but I've never had anything but a standalone
>computer. "PC", it seems to me, implies standalone capability, even if it
>can connect to a network.

I wouldn't want to go to the wall over this, but in those days quite a lot
of data was stored on little tape cassettes, and paper tape drives were used
too. I THINK the earliest IBM PCs had 5.25" floppy drives (truly floppy by
the way). At the time, the debate was over whether CPM or MSDOS would
prevail. MSDOS stood for Microsoft Disc Operating System, so it's logical
that even from its earliest day the IMB PC was conceived of as using
floppies.
>
>I like USB and don't dispute its utility. But booting from USB is a new
>idea to me, so I'm learning from this thread. ;<)

I've seen some discussions of the possibility and I can well imagine quite a
number of possible other circumstances when the ability to boot from a
removable drive might be useful. For example, one could imagine having a
second operating system on a plug in drive and that could be kept entirely
separate. One could even conceive of someone who kept XP on one USB drive
and Linux or Unix on another, keeping nothing but encrypted data on the main
computer hard drive. That would be extraordinarily secure, if you think
about it, as without having access to the appropriate OS, you couldn't even
_begin_ to know how to approach data decryption. For example, a Truecrypt
encrypted drive looks and feels like an unformatted drive. It can only be
unlocked with a running version of the software and the right password. Of
course, it goes without saying that such a thing would be very unpopular
with Law enforcement agencies, as it would be impossible to prove that the
hard drive WAS an encrypted drive.
--
All the Best
Ian Hoare
http://www.souvigne.com
mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 16, 2005 5:13:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

In news:7e6511pdjpndr6miiq07vjoqhvbmf65d96@4ax.com,
Ian Hoare <ianhoare@angelfire.com> typed:

> I THINK the earliest IBM PCs had 5.25" floppy
> drives (truly floppy by the way).


Yes. Modern 3.5" floppy disks are still floppy. However, unlike
the 5.25" diskettes you're referring to, they are packaged in a
hard plastic casing.

By the way, as a matter of historical interest, the first floppy
disks were 8". They were first introduced to load the microcode
on IBM mainframes around 1970.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 16, 2005 5:13:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

If I remember right, the IBM 5150 first shipped with only a jack for a
cassette recorder at the base price. It booted to the Basic prompt. The
5.25 drive was extra. I never saw one without a floppy and the cassette
recorder idea never caught on.

I used 8" diskettes on a dedicated word processor in the late 70's and had
to pay around $10 apiece. When I first taught Basic as a middle school math
teacher (1969), we accessed a time-sharing mainframe with a teletype machine
and saved the programs to paper tape.

In high school in the 50's we computed ballistics problems with rubber bands
and paper clips. :) 

--
Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
(Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
"Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
news:7e6511pdjpndr6miiq07vjoqhvbmf65d96@4ax.com...
> Salut/Hi R. C. White,
>
> le/on Tue, 15 Feb 2005 08:08:30 -0600, tu disais/you said:-
>
>>Hi, Ian.
>>
>>>>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!
>>>
>>> I've had several.
>>>
>>> Sinclair ZX80
>><snip list>
>>
>>Yeah, I heard of those - in addition to my own TRS=80s. But those were
>>when
>>we still called them "microcomputers" or a variety of other names. As I
>>recall, we didn't call them PCs until IBM introduced its Personal Computer
>>in 1981 - and it always had a floppy disk drive.
>
> Good point. I'd sort of not noticed your "PC" restriction. So strike the
> Sinclairs which were never called PCs. The Amstrads were on the other
> hand,
> The CPC 464 was the "Colour Personal Computer" model 4 with 64k of RAM. My
> 6128 did have a single 3" floppy drive and 128k of RAM.
>
>>I can imagine a workstation, attached to a network, which might not need a
>>disk drive of any kind, but I've never had anything but a standalone
>>computer. "PC", it seems to me, implies standalone capability, even if it
>>can connect to a network.
>
> I wouldn't want to go to the wall over this, but in those days quite a lot
> of data was stored on little tape cassettes, and paper tape drives were
> used
> too. I THINK the earliest IBM PCs had 5.25" floppy drives (truly floppy by
> the way). At the time, the debate was over whether CPM or MSDOS would
> prevail. MSDOS stood for Microsoft Disc Operating System, so it's logical
> that even from its earliest day the IMB PC was conceived of as using
> floppies.
>>
>>I like USB and don't dispute its utility. But booting from USB is a new
>>idea to me, so I'm learning from this thread. ;<)
>
> I've seen some discussions of the possibility and I can well imagine quite
> a
> number of possible other circumstances when the ability to boot from a
> removable drive might be useful. For example, one could imagine having a
> second operating system on a plug in drive and that could be kept entirely
> separate. One could even conceive of someone who kept XP on one USB drive
> and Linux or Unix on another, keeping nothing but encrypted data on the
> main
> computer hard drive. That would be extraordinarily secure, if you think
> about it, as without having access to the appropriate OS, you couldn't
> even
> _begin_ to know how to approach data decryption. For example, a Truecrypt
> encrypted drive looks and feels like an unformatted drive. It can only be
> unlocked with a running version of the software and the right password. Of
> course, it goes without saying that such a thing would be very unpopular
> with Law enforcement agencies, as it would be impossible to prove that the
> hard drive WAS an encrypted drive.
> --
> All the Best
> Ian Hoare
> http://www.souvigne.com
> mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 16, 2005 1:52:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Salut/Hi "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com>,

le/on Tue, 15 Feb 2005 19:35:16 -0700, tu disais/you said:-

>If I remember right, the IBM 5150 first shipped with only a jack for a
>cassette recorder at the base price. It booted to the Basic prompt. The
>5.25 drive was extra. I never saw one without a floppy and the cassette
>recorder idea never caught on.

On the first IBM PCs, _everything_ was extra. Keyboard, monitor, video
adaptor, (d'you remember the old Hercules board?) everything!! I'm surprised
though about the FDD!

>In high school in the 50's we computed ballistics problems with rubber bands
>and paper clips. :) 

Ah... those were the days, I remember one day at the physics lab doing that.
I was seeking, in addition to computing ballistics, to demonstrate the
resonance of enamelled steel lampshades. I am afraid that my aim was a touch
off, because the paper clip hit the light bulb, broke it, and lodged between
the two terminals of the coiled coil of the bulb. After the sound of
tinkling glass, instantly followed by the flash and bang of the short
circuit and the descent of darkness as every fuse in the place blew, came
the awed voice of Gordon, the lab assistant. "Good shot, Ian". (I failed
physics that year!) Later on, when I was older, but no wiser I was
"recruited" to shoot down the demonstration helium filled rescue balloons
released in error at one of the Olympia Boat shows and nestling up against
the ceiling. I did better with my trusty 'lacky band and paper clips than
the staff did with their air rifle!

I have to admit that the rather dishy models who had been employed to wander
round the show trailing their balloons soon learnt not to come near our
stand! They found it disconcerting to be wandering around dangling limp bits
of rubber on the ground! Ah me...


--
All the Best
Ian Hoare
http://www.souvigne.com
mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 16, 2005 1:52:12 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Great story! But Ian, about that last sentence.... Oh am I tempted!

--
Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
(Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
"Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
news:4156119e47jdnlkq4uqaeg0asbb92ipgit@4ax.com...
> Salut/Hi "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com>,
>
> le/on Tue, 15 Feb 2005 19:35:16 -0700, tu disais/you said:-
>
>>If I remember right, the IBM 5150 first shipped with only a jack for a
>>cassette recorder at the base price. It booted to the Basic prompt. The
>>5.25 drive was extra. I never saw one without a floppy and the cassette
>>recorder idea never caught on.
>
> On the first IBM PCs, _everything_ was extra. Keyboard, monitor, video
> adaptor, (d'you remember the old Hercules board?) everything!! I'm
> surprised
> though about the FDD!
>
>>In high school in the 50's we computed ballistics problems with rubber
>>bands
>>and paper clips. :) 
>
> Ah... those were the days, I remember one day at the physics lab doing
> that.
> I was seeking, in addition to computing ballistics, to demonstrate the
> resonance of enamelled steel lampshades. I am afraid that my aim was a
> touch
> off, because the paper clip hit the light bulb, broke it, and lodged
> between
> the two terminals of the coiled coil of the bulb. After the sound of
> tinkling glass, instantly followed by the flash and bang of the short
> circuit and the descent of darkness as every fuse in the place blew, came
> the awed voice of Gordon, the lab assistant. "Good shot, Ian". (I failed
> physics that year!) Later on, when I was older, but no wiser I was
> "recruited" to shoot down the demonstration helium filled rescue balloons
> released in error at one of the Olympia Boat shows and nestling up against
> the ceiling. I did better with my trusty 'lacky band and paper clips than
> the staff did with their air rifle!
>
> I have to admit that the rather dishy models who had been employed to
> wander
> round the show trailing their balloons soon learnt not to come near our
> stand! They found it disconcerting to be wandering around dangling limp
> bits
> of rubber on the ground! Ah me...
>
>
> --
> All the Best
> Ian Hoare
> http://www.souvigne.com
> mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
February 16, 2005 3:12:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi,

I remember working for a small company that installed and maintained
networks using Windows for Workgroups 3.11. The workstation computers did
not have a hard drive, but booted from a floppy disk that enable the
computer to connect to a server to download and run the O/S and other
programs from. The PC just had the FDD no HDD at all. The floppy disk had
the autoexec.bat, config.sys and all other necessary drivers, especially the
ethernet drivers (back then we were using Lantastic). The PC would boot
from the floppy, connect to the server then download the necessary files and
programs to the PC`s RAM to operate.

Jeff

"Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> wrote in message
news:etVWoA9EFHA.3512@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> If I remember right, the IBM 5150 first shipped with only a jack for a
> cassette recorder at the base price. It booted to the Basic prompt. The
> 5.25 drive was extra. I never saw one without a floppy and the cassette
> recorder idea never caught on.
>
> I used 8" diskettes on a dedicated word processor in the late 70's and had
> to pay around $10 apiece. When I first taught Basic as a middle school
> math teacher (1969), we accessed a time-sharing mainframe with a teletype
> machine and saved the programs to paper tape.
>
> In high school in the 50's we computed ballistics problems with rubber
> bands and paper clips. :) 
>
> --
> Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
> (Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
> "Ian Hoare" <ianhoare@angelfire.com> wrote in message
> news:7e6511pdjpndr6miiq07vjoqhvbmf65d96@4ax.com...
>> Salut/Hi R. C. White,
>>
>> le/on Tue, 15 Feb 2005 08:08:30 -0600, tu disais/you said:-
>>
>>>Hi, Ian.
>>>
>>>>>A PC without a disk drive? I've never heard of such a computer!
>>>>
>>>> I've had several.
>>>>
>>>> Sinclair ZX80
>>><snip list>
>>>
>>>Yeah, I heard of those - in addition to my own TRS=80s. But those were
>>>when
>>>we still called them "microcomputers" or a variety of other names. As I
>>>recall, we didn't call them PCs until IBM introduced its Personal
>>>Computer
>>>in 1981 - and it always had a floppy disk drive.
>>
>> Good point. I'd sort of not noticed your "PC" restriction. So strike the
>> Sinclairs which were never called PCs. The Amstrads were on the other
>> hand,
>> The CPC 464 was the "Colour Personal Computer" model 4 with 64k of RAM.
>> My
>> 6128 did have a single 3" floppy drive and 128k of RAM.
>>
>>>I can imagine a workstation, attached to a network, which might not need
>>>a
>>>disk drive of any kind, but I've never had anything but a standalone
>>>computer. "PC", it seems to me, implies standalone capability, even if
>>>it
>>>can connect to a network.
>>
>> I wouldn't want to go to the wall over this, but in those days quite a
>> lot
>> of data was stored on little tape cassettes, and paper tape drives were
>> used
>> too. I THINK the earliest IBM PCs had 5.25" floppy drives (truly floppy
>> by
>> the way). At the time, the debate was over whether CPM or MSDOS would
>> prevail. MSDOS stood for Microsoft Disc Operating System, so it's logical
>> that even from its earliest day the IMB PC was conceived of as using
>> floppies.
>>>
>>>I like USB and don't dispute its utility. But booting from USB is a new
>>>idea to me, so I'm learning from this thread. ;<)
>>
>> I've seen some discussions of the possibility and I can well imagine
>> quite a
>> number of possible other circumstances when the ability to boot from a
>> removable drive might be useful. For example, one could imagine having a
>> second operating system on a plug in drive and that could be kept
>> entirely
>> separate. One could even conceive of someone who kept XP on one USB drive
>> and Linux or Unix on another, keeping nothing but encrypted data on the
>> main
>> computer hard drive. That would be extraordinarily secure, if you think
>> about it, as without having access to the appropriate OS, you couldn't
>> even
>> _begin_ to know how to approach data decryption. For example, a Truecrypt
>> encrypted drive looks and feels like an unformatted drive. It can only be
>> unlocked with a running version of the software and the right password.
>> Of
>> course, it goes without saying that such a thing would be very unpopular
>> with Law enforcement agencies, as it would be impossible to prove that
>> the
>> hard drive WAS an encrypted drive.
>> --
>> All the Best
>> Ian Hoare
>> http://www.souvigne.com
>> mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 16, 2005 11:46:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

ROFL
But you managed to restrain yourself <g>
Joan

Colin Barnhorst wrote:
> Great story! But Ian, about that last sentence.... Oh am I tempted!
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 16, 2005 11:46:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Ain't imagination a wonderful thing? <g>

--
Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
(Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
"Joan Archer" <Joan@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:eoEmDiGFFHA.2296@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> ROFL
> But you managed to restrain yourself <g>
> Joan
>
> Colin Barnhorst wrote:
>> Great story! But Ian, about that last sentence.... Oh am I tempted!
>>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 17, 2005 1:35:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Salut/Hi "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com>,

le/on Wed, 16 Feb 2005 09:15:11 -0700, tu disais/you said:-

>Great story! But Ian, about that last sentence.... Oh am I tempted!

"Give in to tempation, it may not pass your way again!" RAH. Sayings of
Lazarus Long


--
All the Best
Ian Hoare
http://www.souvigne.com
mailbox full to avoid spam. try me at website
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 17, 2005 1:10:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

<lol> Yes the mind just boggles <g>
Joan

Colin Barnhorst wrote:
> Ain't imagination a wonderful thing? <g>
>
!