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Asus A8N-SLI chipset fan dying

Tags:
  • Asus
  • Chipsets
  • Fan
  • SLI
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
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January 25, 2007 7:08:39 PM

Hi,

I have an Asus A8N-SLI of which the little nForce chip fan is dying. I really want to replace it but I've never replaced such a fancy looking fan. I could not find a picture of the fan I have. It seems the mobo pics on the internet use a different fan than I have. However, this one comes pretty close except that mine is different ontop:


The questions:
1) Can I let the mobo run without any fan on the chipset? If I would remove the casing the chipset should get enough air from the front fan of the case. There is a clear path from the front fan to the chipset. However, I have my doubts.

2) When I replace the fan, what fan should/could I get. I have replaced fans in the past but nothing so 'fancy' as this one. Should I get the same shape/design fan or could I replaced it with a standard black one?

Well, that's about all.

Any info and/or help would be greatly appriciated.

More about : asus a8n sli chipset fan dying

January 25, 2007 10:42:34 PM

It's good to replace the fan couse the chipset may overheat and it's need an a active cooling...try to find some VGA fancy cooler may come out even bether....or try to clean the fan or lybricate with some oil (machine oil) or with rost off (Wurth), or some motor oil. :lol:  that may fix the problem regards
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January 25, 2007 11:09:06 PM

yeah mine died to i didnt replace it for a year and my temps never went over 24c when i replaced my mobo i put a new heatsink on it.
January 26, 2007 12:21:03 AM

I've had my A8N SLI-Deluxe since Dec. of 2004, and I'm on my third chipset fan. They're not too hard to replace, but I would go with chrisbrown's Zalman recommendation. All three of the Asus fans I have used are extremely loud, and are set to run at high speeds, which is why I think they tend to fail. As cooling fans go, they're really pathetic and cheap. I guess it's easier to slap a cheap fan on a thin piece of metal than to build a heatsink, with or without a fan.

In thinking about how to best handle your fan issue be sure to consider your overall heat sources. Are you running SLI? How are you cooling your CPU and RAM? You said you had a clear path from your front case fan over the chipset - what are your case temps like? If you have good airflow and low case temps then I think a passive heatsink will work great. If you're running SLI with warm cards then you might want to think about a solution with a fan.

What do others think?
January 26, 2007 1:39:32 PM

Quote:
or try to clean the fan or lybricate with some oil (machine oil) or with rost off (Wurth), or some motor oil. :lol:  that may fix the problem regards

I'll have to give this a try.

Quote:
thinking about how to best handle your fan issue be sure to consider your overall heat sources.

The case is like a windmill. There is front case and back case fan. And on the left side of the case there is a CPU air intake. The CPU is cooled by a Zalman cooler, not sure which model. The memory is right next to this cooler and should benefit from it. The 7800GT has its stock cooler. AI Booster reports the CPU temp at 34 degrees and system temp at 39 degrees. No load at the moment but the computer is running 24x7.

I will first try to clean out the fan and oil it a bit like Blazk0 suggested. I never tried this so it might be interesting to see if this helps. If not, I will look for a fan from Zalman or other good fan building manufacturers.

Thank you for your input so far.
January 26, 2007 2:22:36 PM

I have an A8N-E with a really loud fan (getting worse and worse). Since my board is still under the 3 years manufacture warranty, I sent an email out to Asus telling them about my loud fan. They are now sending me a replacement fan free of charge. I am quite please with Asus for resolving this issue with out any hassle on my part.
January 26, 2007 2:33:17 PM

Funnily enough, my A8N SLI chipset fan was dying too, but i couldnt find a low enough profile one locally that would fit under my 8800GTX, so i ended up buying a fan for my other computer that uses an A8N-E and putting the A8N-E chipset fan in the SLI. Sorted heh
January 26, 2007 2:52:55 PM

Hey Folks,

I also own an A8N-SLI motherboard whose fan was on its way out. Considering the replacement fans from ASUS are equally poor quality, I decided I would replace the fan with the heatpipe from the A8N-SLI Premium board.

The A8N-SLI boards have the same layout. I ordered a heatpipe from ASUS, took off the two heatsinks off my board, cleaned off the thermal material, and slapped the heatpipe (comes with pre-applied thermal material) to the board, made sure the pipe was attached to the board, put everything back in my tower and booted up - been running for a year with no problems. I play games on max settings for hours and no problems. Really quiet too. Only thing, I had to disable the Chipset Fan Fail feature in my board..........

I think the heatpipe only runs $15.00

A cheap and easy and proven solution to the noisy fan.

I urge people to try that instead of another fan, or passive heatsink because with the ASUS heatpipe, there is no worrying about whether or not a video card will fit, as the cooling solution is very low profile.

Hope that helps,

Mark
January 26, 2007 3:11:07 PM

Quote:
I have an A8N-E with a really loud fan (getting worse and worse). Since my board is still under the 3 years manufacture warranty, I sent an email out to Asus telling them about my loud fan. They are now sending me a replacement fan free of charge. I am quite please with Asus for resolving this issue with out any hassle on my part.


Yes, absolutely! Whatever the shortcomings of the early A8N-SLI and Deluxe, and there were many, Asus has been good about sending me replacement fans.

I ask about the airflow because I've been using a Zalman 7000 on my FX-55 (an early clawhammer version), and it does a great job cooling my CPU and RAM, but with the chipset fan isolated between two video cards (early production model EVGA 6800 GT's) that ran really hot the chipset was always running too hot. This is with 120 mm intake and exhaust fans. I finally ended up modding my case by replacing the clear panel in side with aluminum mesh to draw more air in, and this finally reduced my chipset temps.

I see that as I'm writing this Finlander has a great solution:

Quote:
I also own an A8N-SLI motherboard whose fan was on its way out. Considering the replacement fans from ASUS are equally poor quality, I decided I would replace the fan with the heatpipe from the A8N-SLI Premium board.

The A8N-SLI boards have the same layout. I ordered a heatpipe from ASUS, took off the two heatsinks off my board, cleaned off the thermal material, and slapped the heatpipe (comes with pre-applied thermal material) to the board, made sure the pipe was attached to the board, put everything back in my tower and booted up - been running for a year with no problems. I play games on max settings for hours and no problems. Really quiet too. Only thing, I had to disable the Chipset Fan Fail feature in my board..........



You, sir, are a clever boy! Does the heatpipe mount over the chipset using the mounting holes that the old fan used? I had always assumed the premium boards were different in their attachment method...

Thanks for posting!
January 26, 2007 3:17:40 PM

yeah dont think ill ever get a passive (heatpipe) mobo again and if i do ill be replacing it with fans. My new heat pipe motherboard runs 2x hotter then my sli delux mobo did with a broken fan. not to mention i never heard a chipset fan EVER from ANY motherboard EVER they just arent loud. dont say asus's poor quality like every other mobo maker out there doesnt use cheap crap 2 cent fans :p  thats just dumb.
January 26, 2007 3:20:33 PM

The heatpipe does mount over the existing holes. I had to slightly bend the heatpipe about one or two degrees so the holes would line up - One look at my board you'd swear it was a Premium.

I was careful to clean off the old thermal material with rubbing alcohol and Q-tips, and I dry fitted the pipe to the board to make sure everything lined up. Then I removed the backing from the pre-applied thermal material and applied the pipe to the board, making sure all the pins were through the board and that it was secure.

Runs like a charm!
January 26, 2007 3:27:59 PM

Quote:
yeah dont think ill ever get a passive (heatpipe) mobo again and if i do ill be replacing it with fans. My new heat pipe motherboard runs 2x hotter then my sli delux mobo did with a broken fan. not to mention i never heard a chipset fan EVER from ANY motherboard EVER they just arent loud. dont say asus's poor quality like every other mobo maker out there doesnt use cheap crap 2 cent fans :p  thats just dumb.


The temperature issue after changing the fan was a concern to me, but I do have good case cooling and since it is rocksolid and stable, it has worked good for me. Probably the reason why I was able to hear the fan on my board was because I ran a 120 mm stealth case fan, and everything else was fairly quiet, and I did notice when I took the fan out.

I meant to say the replacement chipset fans offered by ASUS were terrible. I did not mean to put down the other mobo manufacturers or anything.
January 26, 2007 3:30:54 PM

well to be fair i have 17 fans in my comp. i have no idea why my mobo is so hot with heatpipe but im use to it being 24c all the time and now its 45c all the time.

BTW ignore me if i make no sense i just woke up from a nice 4 hours of sleep.
February 8, 2007 2:18:52 PM

Quote:
The chipset cooler on my A8N-E was driving me mad so i replaced it with this.

Can you tell me how to unhook the fan. It seems to be fixed to the mobo by 2 'pins' on either side. I tried a few things but I am unable to unplug it. To me it seems I have to take out the entire motherboard to be able to remove the fan. Any help would be appriciated.
February 8, 2007 7:59:33 PM

You must take out the mainboard
!