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HDTV and Computers

Last response: in Home Theatre
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May 30, 2004 8:56:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I've been interested in viewing HDTV directly from a set-top cable-box
on a computer screen for some time and I seem to get a variety of
different statements of facts about whether this is possible? I
wonder if someone could set us all straight on the important aspects
of this issue?

I've read that it is not possible for video input cards to receive
HDTV composite input from a cable box because the bandwidth
requirements are too high for the video card. Is this true or are the
reasons more technical, legal, or political?

Can someone clearly and concisely state the reasons why ATI and/or
other video card manufacturers have not offered a video input card for
sale that will receive high resolution HDTV from an HD cable box?

thanks,
Ron
ps. sorry about the cross post

More about : hdtv computers

Anonymous
May 30, 2004 1:13:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Ron" <rgraham1@maine.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1a366fd4.0405300356.56858d1f@posting.google.com...
> I've been interested in viewing HDTV directly from a set-top cable-box
> on a computer screen for some time and I seem to get a variety of
> different statements of facts about whether this is possible? I
> wonder if someone could set us all straight on the important aspects
> of this issue?
>
> I've read that it is not possible for video input cards to receive
> HDTV composite input from a cable box because the bandwidth
> requirements are too high for the video card. Is this true or are the
> reasons more technical, legal, or political?
>
> Can someone clearly and concisely state the reasons why ATI and/or
> other video card manufacturers have not offered a video input card for
> sale that will receive high resolution HDTV from an HD cable box?
>
http://www.digitalconnection.com/Products/Video/mdp120.... seems to do HD on
the monitor.
Tee Jay
Related resources
Anonymous
June 3, 2004 4:36:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Ron" <rgraham1@maine.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1a366fd4.0405300356.56858d1f@posting.google.com...
> I've been interested in viewing HDTV directly from a set-top cable-box
> on a computer screen for some time and I seem to get a variety of
> different statements of facts about whether this is possible? I
> wonder if someone could set us all straight on the important aspects
> of this issue?

For one, if you only want to view it and not capture it to disk, there are
component video to VGA converters that will do the trick, bypassing the
computer.

Most HDTV cards for PCs do the tuning, and they likely won't work with
cable. The high speed of the component video signal would be a lot of data
to compress and save onto disk, and I don't know if today's systems can
handle the bandwidth.

Brad Houser
<not speaking for Intel>
Anonymous
June 3, 2004 5:37:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

rgraham1@maine.rr.com (Ron) wrote in message news:<1a366fd4.0405300356.56858d1f@posting.google.com>...
> I've been interested in viewing HDTV directly from a set-top cable-box
> on a computer screen for some time and I seem to get a variety of
> different statements of facts about whether this is possible? I
> wonder if someone could set us all straight on the important aspects
> of this issue?

It comes down to this. If you want to use an analog display you need
an RGB output. If you want to use a digital display you need to have a
DVI output.
If you can get a D-sub vga output on your TV receiver then you are
ready to go. If you can get 3 RCA in RGB mode or BNC then you will
need to adapt the shape to a D-sub VGA connector.

The QAM (cable) receivers aren't selling in stores as far as I know.
They were supposed to but aren't for some reason. The cable company
will rent one to you though. It will always cost money and you can't
pay it off :)  .The ATSC receivers are selling in stores but they are
for over-the-air of course. I have a QAM receier and it has DVI but I
don't think it can be set to analog mode to get the RGB out of it. And
I don't think the 3 RCA on mine can be set to RGB mode either. It will
be stuck in color difference mode.

> I've read that it is not possible for video input cards to receive
> HDTV composite input from a cable box because the bandwidth
> requirements are too high for the video card. Is this true or are the
> reasons more technical, legal, or political?

If you have a haupage winTV tuner card ($50) you can plug your TV
receiver signal into that. It won't look very good at all. It will
have to work with 480i output on your receiver and your monitor will
have to reconvert that to progressive scan in addition to the fact
that composite looks bad to begin with.

> Can someone clearly and concisely state the reasons why ATI and/or
> other video card manufacturers have not offered a video input card for
> sale that will receive high resolution HDTV from an HD cable box?

Video input has been offered in the past with some cards. It is not
often on other cards that are seperate from the GPU. 3dfx main board
had a dongle that had s-video input, that model was the 3500. But
s-video is still not vga.

Nvidia is coming out with video cards this year (late I think) that
will have video input (not just output for once). The video input
would probably be 3 RCA RGB and color difference via some kind of
dongle.

Best thing to do is bypass using your computer and go directly to a
CRT VGA screen like you were saying. A CRT VGA screen is much better
looking than an HDTV screen even for viewing HDTV. Also it will cost a
LOT less and you can use the VGA screen for work too.

There is little HD and ED DTV right now so I woudn't think about this
too much. After all it's just television. If you pay for that digital
cable subscription for $60 dollars a month or whatever, there is so
little DTV being sent over digital cable it is such a waste. Even the
DTV channels don't look that good because they rarely play anything
recorded in ED or HD. And there are only about 8 or so DTV channels on
comcast's digital cable highest paying level of service.

> thanks,
> Ron
> ps. sorry about the cross post
!