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cable for HDTV

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  • HDTV
  • Cable
  • Home Theatre
Last response: in Home Theatre
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June 1, 2004 2:24:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have had a Voom system installed recently and I am quite pleased about it.
Unfortunately the installing firm did not set up two separate coaxial cables
for the local and the satellite signals. I have decided to do it myself.
Here is the question:

Who makes the best RG-6 cable for that purpose? I know that RG-6 and other
cables are not all created equal.

More about : cable hdtv

Anonymous
June 2, 2004 11:13:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Did you get the antenna that Voom provided or are you using a
different type? If you are using the Voom one then you may want to use
a diplexer to combine the antenna and satellite signals across the
exising cable. This will save you the aggrivation of having to mount
the antenna, run a new piece of coax, and drill into the house. I
signed up for Voom a short while ago and they are coming out next week
to install my dish. This is how I am going to do it for local and
satellite service. I know that Terk has a diplexer on the market that
runs for about 20 bucks.
However, back to your question about the cabling. RG-6 is RG-6. There
are basically two types of coax used in households RG-6 and RG-9. RG-9
is the weaker of the two, you get a bunch of interference because it
is a thinner cable. There are two types of RG-6 single and double
shielding. Single shielding works fine and is much easier to work
with, unless you are living next to a power grid or have generators
running all of the time.
Anonymous
June 2, 2004 2:41:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> However, back to your question about the cabling. RG-6 is RG-6. There
> are basically two types of coax used in households RG-6 and RG-9.

I think you mean RG-59.

RG-9
> is the weaker of the two, you get a bunch of interference because it
> is a thinner cable.

A thinner cable has nothing to do with interference. RG-59 cannot support
the bandwidth that a RG-6 cable can carry.

There are two types of RG-6 single and double
> shielding. Single shielding works fine and is much easier to work
> with, unless you are living next to a power grid or have generators
> running all of the time.

Only double shielding? I think you mean quad shielding. And I never heard of
single shielding. What is that?

Scott
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