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Intel 560J, 561, 660, or 661? How to decide ???

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January 26, 2007 5:38:27 PM

I was about to buy a 3.6 GHZ P4 processor and I noticed they come in 5 styles:

560 (I ruled this one out due to the "J" model having reduced heat)
560J (Reduced heat output and E0 stepping)
561 (64 bit enabled, not sure if it's reduced heat output) ((64bit may be handy for VISTA))
660 (has a 2MB L2 cache)
661 (has a 2MB L2 cache & 64 bit enabled)

1) Is there any noticable speed difference with the 2MB L2 cache? I don't
do any super intense processing but I can tell a major difference
between my 3.0GHZ and 3.6GHZ machines at work.

2) Is the 560J the only one with "heat reduced" feature? Or does the 561, 660 and 661 have it also?

3) Is the 64bit feature of the 561 and 661 really important for speed? I
don't think I will be changing to Vista since I'm pretty happy with XP.

4) The 560J is probably the best bang for the buck but I wanted to ask
if the other models were worth the extra cash...

Thanks
Tom
January 26, 2007 5:50:06 PM

Pentium 4 is already an obsolete CPU class.
Which motherboard are you currently using?
January 26, 2007 7:36:00 PM

Are you upgrading or are you about to Buy a Completely new System??
January 26, 2007 8:59:25 PM

Quote:
I was about to buy a 3.6 GHZ P4 processor and I noticed they come in 5 styles:

560 (I ruled this one out due to the "J" model having reduced heat)
560J (Reduced heat output and E0 stepping)
561 (64 bit enabled, not sure if it's reduced heat output) ((64bit may be handy for VISTA))
660 (has a 2MB L2 cache)
661 (has a 2MB L2 cache & 64 bit enabled)

1) Is there any noticable speed difference with the 2MB L2 cache? I don't
do any super intense processing but I can tell a major difference
between my 3.0GHZ and 3.6GHZ machines at work.

2) Is the 560J the only one with "heat reduced" feature? Or does the 561, 660 and 661 have it also?

3) Is the 64bit feature of the 561 and 661 really important for speed? I
don't think I will be changing to Vista since I'm pretty happy with XP.

4) The 560J is probably the best bang for the buck but I wanted to ask
if the other models were worth the extra cash...

Thanks
Tom
If you really must get one of the above, get the 661. It's built on the Cedar Mill core(65nm) running cooler, using less energy, and/or overclocking better. GL :) 
January 26, 2007 9:01:53 PM

Yeah, the 661 is the best if those are your only choices, but any C2D will demolish those cpus.
January 26, 2007 9:20:02 PM

I am upgrading a Dell GX280 Optiplex that has a 3.0GHZ P4
right now. I really like the Dell because it is so quiet so I really
just want to upgrade the CPU. It has a Socket LGA 775.

I was under the impression that the Dual Cores generated too
much heat for the Dell to handle. I have no idea if the Core 2
processors would work but for sure they are too expensive for
what I need. I was looking to spend $140-$200 on a raw processor
and just drop it in. The Dell does NOT allow overclocking so that
is not a consideration.

I was just looking for the best bang for my buck upgrade in this
price range. In looking at the CPU charts on this site, I wasn't
sure I would see any benefit in any of the CPUs I listed above
over the 560J. That's why I asked in this forum..
January 26, 2007 9:34:48 PM

Quote:
I was about to buy a 3.6 GHZ P4 processor and I noticed they come in 5 styles:

560 (I ruled this one out due to the "J" model having reduced heat)
560J (Reduced heat output and E0 stepping)
561 (64 bit enabled, not sure if it's reduced heat output) ((64bit may be handy for VISTA))
660 (has a 2MB L2 cache)
661 (has a 2MB L2 cache & 64 bit enabled)

1) Is there any noticable speed difference with the 2MB L2 cache? I don't
do any super intense processing but I can tell a major difference
between my 3.0GHZ and 3.6GHZ machines at work.

2) Is the 560J the only one with "heat reduced" feature? Or does the 561, 660 and 661 have it also?

3) Is the 64bit feature of the 561 and 661 really important for speed? I
don't think I will be changing to Vista since I'm pretty happy with XP.

4) The 560J is probably the best bang for the buck but I wanted to ask
if the other models were worth the extra cash...

Thanks
Tom


VR-Zone had an article like 1 month ago where they mentioned that Intel was about to release new steppings for the Intel Pentium 4 631,641 and I think 661 too. Go to CPU-world.com and check which is the LATEST stepping for the 661 and buy that one, otherwise you might not get the best of it.
January 26, 2007 9:38:23 PM

the core 2 duo E6300 is $180 man
that will BLOW THE PANTS off that P4
go for the core 2 !!!
they dont get hot.. unlike the pentium 8xx/9xx series
January 26, 2007 9:49:37 PM

he just said he wants to upgrade his dell so if he wants a core 2 duo he would have to change everything and will cost more than just the cpu.

I know the c2d kicks the *dd of the p4's, but you know what, im tired of telling people that, it would just wont stop, I just answer what they ask ;) 
January 26, 2007 9:52:34 PM

well he just said he had a lga775
January 26, 2007 9:53:21 PM

Quote:
I was about to buy a 3.6 GHZ P4 processor
You was goign to make a mistake.
Quote:
and I noticed they come in 5 styles:

560 (I ruled this one out due to the "J" model having reduced heat)
560J (Reduced heat output and E0 stepping)
561 (64 bit enabled, not sure if it's reduced heat output) ((64bit may be handy for VISTA))
660 (has a 2MB L2 cache)
661 (has a 2MB L2 cache & 64 bit enabled)

1) Is there any noticable speed difference with the 2MB L2 cache? I don't
do any super intense processing but I can tell a major difference
between my 3.0GHZ and 3.6GHZ machines at work.

2) Is the 560J the only one with "heat reduced" feature? Or does the 561, 660 and 661 have it also?

3) Is the 64bit feature of the 561 and 661 really important for speed? I
don't think I will be changing to Vista since I'm pretty happy with XP.

4) The 560J is probably the best bang for the buck but I wanted to ask
if the other models were worth the extra cash...

Thanks
Tom

1. If you must buy a LGA775 CPU and you want to spend less than $100 then:
Get one of the 6x1 with the best freqfency/price factor. There are 4 6x1 models: 631(3.0GHz), 641(3.2GHz), 651(3.4GHz) and 661(3.6GHz). Only the 6x1 models are made by a 65nm process, which is more energy efficient(less wasted energy and heat dissipated) than the 90nm.
All 6xx models, have EIST(enhanced Intel speedstep technology) which makes the 6xx more energy efficient than the 5xx models.
2. If you want a decend CPU and can afford more than $200 then if your mainboards supports it, get a Core2 Duo CPU
3. If you want a sub $100 CPU and you don't have a mainboard, then I recomend you a Athlon64 sAM2 CPU. For $130, you can get a dual core Athlon64 X2 3800+, which is much more faster than the fastest Pentium 4 CPU.
January 26, 2007 9:57:30 PM

Quote:
well he just said he had a lga775


925 chipsets have LGA775 and you cant run a C2D in there ;) 
January 26, 2007 9:59:08 PM

I'd first try to determine whether your motherboard can support a Core 2 Duo. Those P4's probably won't do you that much good anyways. If we can figure out what chipset he has that would help too.

I looked at the replacement parts that dell offers for the 280's but there's only P4's.
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/category.aspx?c=us&l...

A dell forum might have someone who's done it or who's tried and failed.

It might be possible to get a new motherboard and fit it into the dell casing/ducts. (Thats what makes it so quiet).
January 26, 2007 10:40:32 PM

nnooope! e4300 cannot run on the chipset his motherboard carries.
!