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Lowest cost HDTV?

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Anonymous
June 4, 2004 12:37:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27" NTSC
TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
unit as long as it comes with full warranty.

More about : lowest cost hdtv

Anonymous
June 4, 2004 7:46:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27"
NTSC
> TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> unit as long as it comes with full warranty.

If you need a true HDTV with integrated over-the-air and cable tuners, about
the best you can do is the 32" Sanyo that Walmart is selling for about $750.

I myself got a Zenith C32V37 (32" HDTV with integrated over-the-air and
cable tuners) for only $375, but that's because it has a scratch (actually a
rip in the anti-glare coating) in the upper-left corner of the screen.

If you don't need a tuner, you can get a 27" HDTV monitor for as little as
$450, I think, or a refurbished 32" HDTV monitor for $600.
Anonymous
June 4, 2004 7:48:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27"
NTSC
> TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> unit as long as it comes with full warranty.

If you don't need a tuner, you can get a refurbished Philips 32" HDTV
monitor for $500 shipped:

http://www.electronicsnation.com/en/products/flypage/pr...
Related resources
Anonymous
June 4, 2004 10:27:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com>...
> I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27" NTSC
> TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> unit as long as it comes with full warranty.

I bought a "reconditioned" 53" HDTV Cinema Series Toshiba that
exceeded my expectations. I really can't tell the difference from
"new," and the picture quality is fantastic.

I believe online retailers sell a reconditioned Toshiba 43" or 46"
similar model that comes in at the price range you quote. I almost
bought that one but the larger TV's price was not too much more so I
went for it.
Anonymous
June 4, 2004 11:12:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message news:<ggSvc.5122$n65.2728@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>...
> "Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> > I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27"
> NTSC
> > TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> > unit as long as it comes with full warranty.
>
> If you need a true HDTV with integrated over-the-air and cable tuners, about
> the best you can do is the 32" Sanyo that Walmart is selling for about $750.
>
>

Integrated cable tuner? What's up with that?



I myself got a Zenith C32V37 (32" HDTV with integrated over-the-air and
> cable tuners) for only $375, but that's because it has a scratch (actually a
> rip in the anti-glare coating) in the upper-left corner of the screen.
>
> If you don't need a tuner, you can get a 27" HDTV monitor for as little as
> $450, I think, or a refurbished 32" HDTV monitor for $600.
Anonymous
June 4, 2004 2:26:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 20:37:48 GMT, "Bootstrap Bill"
<wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27" NTSC
>TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
>unit as long as it comes with full warranty.

That refurb 32 looks great at the site the poster below me mentioned .
Ive got a Philips 27" and I think its fine.

However if shipping costs are too high or you dont want to buy refurb
at my local circuit city (dont know if all are like this) theyve been
lowering the prices of their 4:3 HDTVs.

I was there last week and they had a Panasonic for 549 , Samsung 599
and Zenith for 519. All were 27" 4:3 HDTV ready.

The refurbs have 90 day warranties , the new ones have 1 year
warranties usually.
Anonymous
June 4, 2004 11:15:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

If I had only $800 to spend, I'd go to a retailer with multiple
finance options (such as Conns-http://www.conns.com) and make it a
down payment on a higher cost television. The entry level set I
recommend to people is the Hitachi 46F500. I've seen this one as low
as $1350. It's a good set, rich features. Not too big and there's a
nice matching table. I don't think anything less than 46" is going to
really give you the wow effect of HD quality.

If you put $800 down on $1400 set, you'd be financing roughly $700
(depending on taxes, this may vary). After interest you'd be paying
about $25-$30/month to pay off the remaining balance in about 3 years.
That may or may not be unacceptable to your budget, I'm just letting
you know, that's an option at a few retailers.

If that's unacceptable and you must have HDTV now, a direct view (tube
based) set is really your only option, look at the Sanyo HT30744. It's
30" 16:9 (widescreen) direct view HDTV which sells at Walmart for
around $750.

http://www.sanyo.com/entertainment/televisions/digital/...

-Jeremy




"Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com>...
> I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27" NTSC
> TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> unit as long as it comes with full warranty.
Anonymous
June 4, 2004 11:56:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

trader4@optonline.net (Chet Hayes) wrote in message news:<b81a861b.0406040612.785f467d@posting.google.com>...
> "Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message news:<ggSvc.5122$n65.2728@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>...
> > "Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> > > I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27"
> NTSC
> > > TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> > > unit as long as it comes with full warranty.
> >
> > If you need a true HDTV with integrated over-the-air and cable tuners, about
> > the best you can do is the 32" Sanyo that Walmart is selling for about $750.
> >
> >
>
> Integrated cable tuner? What's up with that?

The new law is that digital tv's have to be digital cable ready. Not
just cable ready. Starting this year the transition will occur. It is
called cablecard. You get a card from your cable provider and plug it
into the reciever built into your tv. The cable companies are required
to give you a card. The story was posted on
http://www.thedigitalbits.com a month or two ago. I also posted a news
post specifically announcing this. So basically now you can be sure
you can get digital tv from cable and not just over the air. Although
how many DTV channels are offered is still a problem, not to mention
that the DTV channels rarely use ED or HD. Comcast has about 8 DTV
channels on its most expensive television plan (about 60 or 80 dollars
a month). And you have to pay 10 extra for each tv after the main one.
A total waste of digital cable if you ask me.
>
>
> I myself got a Zenith C32V37 (32" HDTV with integrated over-the-air and
> > cable tuners) for only $375, but that's because it has a scratch (actually a
> > rip in the anti-glare coating) in the upper-left corner of the screen.
> >
> > If you don't need a tuner, you can get a 27" HDTV monitor for as little as
> > $450, I think, or a refurbished 32" HDTV monitor for $600.
Anonymous
June 5, 2004 1:32:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I just got the Zenith C27V36 for $425 clearance at Circuit City. Brand new
out of the box. It is NOT 16:9 but still worth the price for a basic unit
that is not part of my home theater, just for the bedroom.

The living room is awaiting the HD2+ DLP's to come out in a few months
(SAMSUNG HLP Models) and will have to see how far my jaw drops when the list
the prices


<okner@newshosting.com> wrote in message
news:19c13a19.0406041856.4d47ec72@posting.google.com...
> trader4@optonline.net (Chet Hayes) wrote in message
news:<b81a861b.0406040612.785f467d@posting.google.com>...
> > "Lawrence G. Mayka" <lgmayka000@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:<ggSvc.5122$n65.2728@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>...
> > > "Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > > news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> > > > I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging
27"
> > NTSC
> > > > TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a
refurbished
> > > > unit as long as it comes with full warranty.
> > >
> > > If you need a true HDTV with integrated over-the-air and cable tuners,
about
> > > the best you can do is the 32" Sanyo that Walmart is selling for about
$750.
> > >
> > >
> >
> > Integrated cable tuner? What's up with that?
>
> The new law is that digital tv's have to be digital cable ready. Not
> just cable ready. Starting this year the transition will occur. It is
> called cablecard. You get a card from your cable provider and plug it
> into the reciever built into your tv. The cable companies are required
> to give you a card. The story was posted on
> http://www.thedigitalbits.com a month or two ago. I also posted a news
> post specifically announcing this. So basically now you can be sure
> you can get digital tv from cable and not just over the air. Although
> how many DTV channels are offered is still a problem, not to mention
> that the DTV channels rarely use ED or HD. Comcast has about 8 DTV
> channels on its most expensive television plan (about 60 or 80 dollars
> a month). And you have to pay 10 extra for each tv after the main one.
> A total waste of digital cable if you ask me.
> >
> >
> > I myself got a Zenith C32V37 (32" HDTV with integrated over-the-air and
> > > cable tuners) for only $375, but that's because it has a scratch
(actually a
> > > rip in the anti-glare coating) in the upper-left corner of the screen.
> > >
> > > If you don't need a tuner, you can get a 27" HDTV monitor for as
little as
> > > $450, I think, or a refurbished 32" HDTV monitor for $600.
Anonymous
June 6, 2004 11:02:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

jeremy@pdq.net (JDeats) wrote in message news:<b0738dc6.0406041815.63905230@posting.google.com>...







> If I had only $800 to spend, I'd go to a retailer with multiple
> finance options

Better to save money for a few months and pay cash. Credit is
great for the house, first new car and dire emergencies (note that 90
days same as cash is great if you pay it off by day 89). A TV is not
an emergency.

Was in Las Vegas for the last Superbowl. Saw a line over 100 feet
long for credit card cash advances. Sad...


-Steve
Anonymous
June 7, 2004 12:33:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

The lowest cost 16:9 moniter I have seen goes for $600 at Sears.
Free Delivery after rebate ,but they don't set it up.
Target wants $800 for the same set delivered.

--
A widescreen edition of a movie presents the film frame as it was seen in
the movie theater. This is the version that best preserves the filmmaker's
original intent.

End of story!
"Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27"
NTSC
> TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> unit as long as it comes with full warranty.
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
June 7, 2004 6:01:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27"
NTSC
> TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
> unit as long as it comes with full warranty.

I've seen 27" 4:3 HDTV-capable sets for $600. If you don't want a bigger TV
than what you have already, that would be a good choice. Most of the newer
ones actually make NTSC look a bit better as well (not dramatically of
course, but somewhat, by smoothing the image and virtually eliminating
visible scanlines). As you move above 30" or so, it's probably more
worthwhile to consider a widescreen set, and the prices start going up.
Anonymous
June 7, 2004 6:56:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Chet Hayes" <trader4@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:b81a861b.0406040612.785f467d@posting.google.com...
> Integrated cable tuner? What's up with that?

When connected directly to a cable TV connection, an integrated cable HDTV
tuner can display any unscrambled (unencoded) HD channels on the cable. In
many areas, these include the usual local HD broadcast channels.
Anonymous
June 7, 2004 8:31:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I agree that credit should be used sparingly, but I don't think it has
to be judt for emergencies. In fact if you want to build up good
credit the best way to do that is to use credit and just pay
everything on time. Over time you will establish a good credit history
and that will lead to a much larger credit line should you need credit
in a crsis.

Some people have a problem with credit (in the same way some people
have a problem with sustance abuse) for those people it's not such a
good thing.

Having said that, I think an extra $25/month inclusion in the
entertainment budget for 3 years is peanuts. That's about the cost of
couple CDs each month. But what's too much is a relative thing.


-Jeremy





sunet@tampabay.rr.com (Pam) wrote in message
>
>
> > If I had only $800 to spend, I'd go to a retailer with multiple
> > finance options
>
> Better to save money for a few months and pay cash. Credit is
> great for the house, first new car and dire emergencies (note that 90
> days same as cash is great if you pay it off by day 89). A TV is not
> an emergency.
>
> Was in Las Vegas for the last Superbowl. Saw a line over 100 feet
> long for credit card cash advances. Sad...
>
>
> -Steve
Anonymous
June 8, 2004 2:35:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Samsung has a 26" 16:9 HDTV moniter that Sears has for $600.
If you're serious about HD,you don't want 4:3!


--
A widescreen edition of a movie presents the film frame as it was seen in
the movie theater. This is the version that best preserves the filmmaker's
original intent.

End of story!
"Matthew Vaughan" <matt-no-spam-109@NOSPAM.hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:10Qwc.15448$Fo4.207086@typhoon.sonic.net...
>
> "Bootstrap Bill" <wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:w_Lvc.27828$wO4.27195@twister.socal.rr.com...
> > I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27"
> NTSC
> > TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a
refurbished
> > unit as long as it comes with full warranty.
>
> I've seen 27" 4:3 HDTV-capable sets for $600. If you don't want a bigger
TV
> than what you have already, that would be a good choice. Most of the newer
> ones actually make NTSC look a bit better as well (not dramatically of
> course, but somewhat, by smoothing the image and virtually eliminating
> visible scanlines). As you move above 30" or so, it's probably more
> worthwhile to consider a widescreen set, and the prices start going up.
>
>
Anonymous
June 9, 2004 12:25:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim Fraas" <jafraas@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:056xc.718$ar.242@attbi_s04...
> Samsung has a 26" 16:9 HDTV moniter that Sears has for $600.
> If you're serious about HD,you don't want 4:3!

I've seen that set and it's not very impressive, in my opinion. Also, Unless
you only plan to watch the approximately 10% (at most) of total programming
that's in HD so far and ignore all the rest, I'm not sure why 16:9 would be
so desirable right now. Of course it really depends on what YOU watch: if
all you watch is prime-time network TV, HBO and other movie channels (and
widescreen DVDs), then 16:9 will be more important to you than if you watch
a variety of news, educational and sports channels that are almost
exclusively NOT HD or widescreen at the moment, and may not be for the next
few years. Otherwise, I'd say it depends on how much you're spending and
thus how long you plan to keep the set. If it's under $1,000 and/or
something you could contemplate replacing in a few years, then I generally
would not recommend 16:9 right now. If you're spending $5,000+ on a set you
expect to keep for more than 5 years, then of course you should get 16:9. In
general I tend to recommend 16:9 only for people getting sets over 30" (or
smaller sets if they will be watching them from very close up). And it's
only been fairly recently that I've been seeing 27-30" 4:3 HD sets that are
both reasonably enough priced and good enough picture-wise (in terms of
SD/NTSC picture, not just HD) to recommend without hesitation (otherwise I'd
still recommend regular analog sets for sizes smaller than 30").
Anonymous
June 9, 2004 1:21:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>Unless
>you only plan to watch the approximately 10% (at most) of total programming
>that's in HD so far and ignore all the rest, I'm not sure why 16:9 would be
>so desirable right now.

Watching movies on a prgressive scan DVD player. The more I watch enhanced
DVD's on 16:9 HD displays, the less I like watching on a 4:3 set, analog or HD.

>HBO and other movie channels

Most of the movies that HBO and Showtime broadcast in HD are broadcast in
widescreen. If you watch a lot of HD-enabled programming in general, 16:9 is
real nice. Becker and ER are simulcast in widescreen HD and so is Malcolm in
the Middle. So even networks are doing it.

>If you're spending $5,000+

Sony, Samsung, JVC, Toshiba and Panasonic all make sub-$2,000 HD sets in 16:9
that're fantastic sets, and great value.
Anonymous
June 11, 2004 7:09:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

--
A widescreen edition of a movie presents the film frame as it was seen in
the movie theater. This is the version that best preserves the filmmaker's
original intent.

End of story!
"Steve Grauman" <oneactor1@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040609052104.02211.00000829@mb-m28.aol.com...
> >Unless
> >you only plan to watch the approximately 10% (at most) of total
programming
> >that's in HD so far and ignore all the rest, I'm not sure why 16:9 would
be
> >so desirable right now.
>
> Watching movies on a prgressive scan DVD player. The more I watch enhanced
> DVD's on 16:9 HD displays, the less I like watching on a 4:3 set, analog
or HD.
>
you got it!


> >HBO and other movie channels
>
> Most of the movies that HBO and Showtime broadcast in HD are broadcast in
> widescreen. If you watch a lot of HD-enabled programming in general, 16:9
is
> real nice. Becker and ER are simulcast in widescreen HD and so is Malcolm
in
> the Middle. So even networks are doing it.
>
Cinemax and Starz are also HD!

> >If you're spending $5,000+
>
> Sony, Samsung, JVC, Toshiba and Panasonic all make sub-$2,000 HD sets in
16:9
> that're fantastic sets, and great value.

I like the idea of spending only 570 thank you.
Anonymous
July 6, 2004 6:24:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

The lowest price I've seen in my area for a new CRT 30'' HDTV is

$999.99
On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 20:37:48 GMT, "Bootstrap Bill"
<wrcousert@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I'm contemplating the purchase of my first HDTV to replace an aging 27" NTSC
>TV. Is $800 about the best I can do now? I'm willing to take a refurbished
>unit as long as it comes with full warranty.
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 6, 2004 6:24:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles Rabinowitz (c.rabinowitz@worldnet.att.net) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> The lowest price I've seen in my area for a new CRT 30'' HDTV is
>
> $999.99

Best Buy has a Philips 30" 16:9 set *plus* a Panasonic "home theater in
a box" (progressive scan DVD changer, surround sound receiver, 6 speakers)
for $999.99.

--
Jeff Rife | "Ho! Ha, ha! Guard! Turn! Parry!
SPAM bait: | Dodge! Spin! Ha! Thrust!"
AskDOJ@usdoj.gov |
uce@ftc.gov | -- Daffy Duck, "Robin Hood Daffy"
Anonymous
July 6, 2004 2:12:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I saw a 30" wide screen direct view (great picture) Phillips tonight
at Walmart for $799. I'm not sure if it had the internal HD tuner and
digital HDMI connector. I think component is almost as good.
Walmart had a nice lineup of HD sets considering the prices. I did
notice that some required a external tuner. One worker working near
the display I asked and he kicked up the sharpness and color on some
the big screens. Sure made a difference. One Panasonic he turned
down the brightness from full up and wow, now that's HD quality.
hdtvfan

On Tue, 6 Jul 2004 01:19:11 -0400, Jeff Rife <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote:

>Charles Rabinowitz (c.rabinowitz@worldnet.att.net) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
>> The lowest price I've seen in my area for a new CRT 30'' HDTV is
>>
>> $999.99
>
>Best Buy has a Philips 30" 16:9 set *plus* a Panasonic "home theater in
>a box" (progressive scan DVD changer, surround sound receiver, 6 speakers)
>for $999.99.
Anonymous
July 7, 2004 7:05:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

As to quote a response i posted a month ago
Samsung has a 26" 16:9 HDTV moniter that Sears has for $600.Amazon has it
for $550 but their shipping is a little high.
--
A widescreen edition of a movie presents the film frame as it was seen in
the movie theater. This is the version that best preserves the filmmaker's
original intent.

End of story!
"hdtvfan" <hdtvfan@aol.com> wrote in message
news:272le0hse32qd0vklrh2ko3ht2kb8hha7r@4ax.com...
> I saw a 30" wide screen direct view (great picture) Phillips tonight
> at Walmart for $799. I'm not sure if it had the internal HD tuner and
> digital HDMI connector. I think component is almost as good.
> Walmart had a nice lineup of HD sets considering the prices. I did
> notice that some required a external tuner. One worker working near
> the display I asked and he kicked up the sharpness and color on some
> the big screens. Sure made a difference. One Panasonic he turned
> down the brightness from full up and wow, now that's HD quality.
> hdtvfan
>
> On Tue, 6 Jul 2004 01:19:11 -0400, Jeff Rife <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote:
>
> >Charles Rabinowitz (c.rabinowitz@worldnet.att.net) wrote in
alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> >> The lowest price I've seen in my area for a new CRT 30'' HDTV is
> >>
> >> $999.99
> >
> >Best Buy has a Philips 30" 16:9 set *plus* a Panasonic "home theater in
> >a box" (progressive scan DVD changer, surround sound receiver, 6
speakers)
> >for $999.99.
>
Anonymous
July 8, 2004 4:51:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim Fraas" <jafraas@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:eMJGc.37741$Oq2.14906@attbi_s52...
>
> As to quote a response i posted a month ago
> Samsung has a 26" 16:9 HDTV moniter that Sears has for $600.Amazon has it
> for $550 but their shipping is a little high.

This is true, but at this size and with this low-quality of a TV, I'd
actually recommend a 4:3 HDTV instead. This particular set, as far as I
could tell, is one of those few remaining low-end sets that do nothing to
improve the look of non-HD material (or even make it look worse than on a
standard TV). I'm not sure it looks all that incredible for HD material
either, plus it's pretty darn small (but still weighs around 100 lbs).
Anonymous
July 10, 2004 6:39:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I am still satisfied. The HD stuff looks AWSUME on it (well on MY set)
and it is inexpensive.

ALL TRUE HD programming is 16:9 so there should not even be a 4:3 HD set.


--
A widescreen edition of a movie presents the film frame as it was seen in
the movie theater. This is the version that best preserves the filmmaker's
original intent.

End of story!
"Matthew Vaughan" <matt-no-spam-109@NOSPAM.hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:GU0Hc.1151$54.12854@typhoon.sonic.net...
> "Jim Fraas" <jafraas@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:eMJGc.37741$Oq2.14906@attbi_s52...
> >
> > As to quote a response i posted a month ago
> > Samsung has a 26" 16:9 HDTV moniter that Sears has for $600.Amazon has
it
> > for $550 but their shipping is a little high.
>
> This is true, but at this size and with this low-quality of a TV, I'd
> actually recommend a 4:3 HDTV instead. This particular set, as far as I
> could tell, is one of those few remaining low-end sets that do nothing to
> improve the look of non-HD material (or even make it look worse than on a
> standard TV). I'm not sure it looks all that incredible for HD material
> either, plus it's pretty darn small (but still weighs around 100 lbs).
>
>
!