changing mother board and proccessor

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
activate?
thanks,
bud
9 answers Last reply
More about changing mother board proccessor
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Hi Buddy,

    If you have a retail version of WindowsXP, then you will be able to
    reactivate on the new hardware. If you have an OEM version (whether that be
    a stand-alone disk bought with a piece of hardware, or a preinstalled
    system), then the change will be seen as a new system, and OEM versions are
    generally permanently tied to the original. In most cases, you will not be
    able to reactivate an OEM version on new hardware.

    --
    Best of Luck,

    Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

    "Buddy Lunceford" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:1ce701c51599$bdbdf690$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    > I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    > better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    > activate?
    > thanks,
    > bud
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Buddy Lunceford wrote:
    > I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    > better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    > activate?
    > thanks,
    > bud


    The answer mostly depends upon what type of license and installation CD
    you have for WinXP.

    If you have a retail license, you'll have no trouble. If you have an
    OEM license with a non-branded, generic OEM CD, you should also have no
    problem. If, however, you have an OEM license with a branded,
    BIOS-locked CD or a "Recovery" CD, you may well not be able to even
    install or repair the OS, much less successfully activate the it.

    Normally, and assuming a retail license (many OEM installations
    and licenses are not transferable to a new motherboard - check yours
    before starting), unless the new motherboard is virtually identical
    (same chipset, same IDE controllers, same BIOS version, etc.) to the
    one on which the WinXP installation was originally performed, you'll
    need to perform a repair (a.k.a. in-place upgrade) installation, at
    the very least:

    How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/directory/article.asp?ID=KB;EN-US;Q315341

    The "why" is quite simple, really, and has nothing to do with
    licensing issues, per se; it's a purely technical matter, at this
    point. You've pulled the proverbial hardware rug out from under the
    OS. (If you don't like -- or get -- the rug analogy, think of it as
    picking up a Cape Cod style home and then setting it down onto a Ranch
    style foundation. It just isn't going to fit.) WinXP, like Win2K
    before it, is not nearly as "promiscuous" as Win9x when it comes to
    accepting any old hardware configuration you throw at it. On
    installation it "tailors" itself to the specific hardware found. This
    is one of the reasons that the entire WinNT/2K/XP OS family is so much
    more stable than the Win9x group.

    As always when undertaking such a significant change, back up any
    important data before starting.

    This will also probably require re-activation, unless you have a
    Volume Licensed version of WinXP Pro installed. If it's been more
    than 120 days since you last activated that specific Product Key,
    you'll most likely be able to activate via the Internet without
    problem. If it's been less, you might have to make a 5 minute phone
    call.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Alex Nichol has an excellent page on Windows Product Activation here
    http://www.aumha.org/a/wpa.htm

    You may need to run a Repair Install immediately after you upgrade your
    hardware. This will rebuild the HAL and enable you to boot to the new
    system. Instructions can be found for How To Run A Repair Install at
    http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm

    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "Buddy Lunceford" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:1ce701c51599$bdbdf690$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    > I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    > better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    > activate?
    > thanks,
    > bud
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Buddy Lunceford" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:1ce701c51599$bdbdf690$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    > I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    > better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    > activate?
    > thanks,
    > bud


    AFAIU, yes, but you'll have to put in a call to the 'activation center'
    explaining this is due to an upgrade of motherboard and cpu.

    george
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Rick:

    The latest hair-splitting on the oem/motherboard replacement issue from
    Microsoft is that a faulty motherboard can be replaced and still activated
    because that's a repair, but if it's an upgrade or a replacement just for
    the fun of it, that doesn't qualify.

    That takes care of activation.

    The problem of a bios-locked oem cd not running on the new motherboard is a
    whole other issue, should a repair install be required.


    "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" <rick@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:ePl3XoaFFHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Hi Buddy,
    >
    > If you have a retail version of WindowsXP, then you will be able to
    > reactivate on the new hardware. If you have an OEM version (whether that
    > be a stand-alone disk bought with a piece of hardware, or a preinstalled
    > system), then the change will be seen as a new system, and OEM versions
    > are generally permanently tied to the original. In most cases, you will
    > not be able to reactivate an OEM version on new hardware.
    >
    > --
    > Best of Luck,
    >
    > Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    > Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    > www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    > Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    >
    > "Buddy Lunceford" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:1ce701c51599$bdbdf690$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    >> I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    >> better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    >> activate?
    >> thanks,
    >> bud
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    > The latest hair-splitting on the oem/motherboard replacement issue from
    > Microsoft is that a faulty motherboard can be replaced and still activated
    > because that's a repair,

    Yes, as long as it's a replacement of the same board. It's not considered a
    repair if you replace it with a different make/model. This is actually fine
    under activation, you can replace any component with another of the same
    one. As in, you can replace a AMD 2700XP chip with another AMD 2700XP chip
    without adding to the count, but if you replace it with an AMD Duron, then
    that will trigger one of the points counted towards needing reactivation.

    --
    Best of Luck,

    Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

    "D.Currie" <dmbcurrie.nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:37nar7F5bn8u9U1@individual.net...
    > Rick:
    >
    > The latest hair-splitting on the oem/motherboard replacement issue from
    > Microsoft is that a faulty motherboard can be replaced and still activated
    > because that's a repair, but if it's an upgrade or a replacement just for
    > the fun of it, that doesn't qualify.
    >
    > That takes care of activation.
    >
    > The problem of a bios-locked oem cd not running on the new motherboard is
    > a whole other issue, should a repair install be required.
    >
    >
    > "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" <rick@mvps.org> wrote in message
    > news:ePl3XoaFFHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> Hi Buddy,
    >>
    >> If you have a retail version of WindowsXP, then you will be able to
    >> reactivate on the new hardware. If you have an OEM version (whether that
    >> be a stand-alone disk bought with a piece of hardware, or a preinstalled
    >> system), then the change will be seen as a new system, and OEM versions
    >> are generally permanently tied to the original. In most cases, you will
    >> not be able to reactivate an OEM version on new hardware.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Best of Luck,
    >>
    >> Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    >> Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    >> www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    >> Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    >>
    >> "Buddy Lunceford" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:1ce701c51599$bdbdf690$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    >>> I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    >>> better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    >>> activate?
    >>> thanks,
    >>> bud
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    That's not what was said at a recent seminar. If it's being replaced because
    the old one is dead or defective, it doesn't matter if it's not the same
    one, as far as activation, although it may make a difference if it's a
    customized oem cd.

    "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" <rick@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:%23IfoqFiFFHA.3928@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> The latest hair-splitting on the oem/motherboard replacement issue from
    >> Microsoft is that a faulty motherboard can be replaced and still
    >> activated because that's a repair,
    >
    > Yes, as long as it's a replacement of the same board. It's not considered
    > a repair if you replace it with a different make/model. This is actually
    > fine under activation, you can replace any component with another of the
    > same one. As in, you can replace a AMD 2700XP chip with another AMD 2700XP
    > chip without adding to the count, but if you replace it with an AMD Duron,
    > then that will trigger one of the points counted towards needing
    > reactivation.
    >
    > --
    > Best of Luck,
    >
    > Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    > Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    > www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    > Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    >
    > "D.Currie" <dmbcurrie.nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:37nar7F5bn8u9U1@individual.net...
    >> Rick:
    >>
    >> The latest hair-splitting on the oem/motherboard replacement issue from
    >> Microsoft is that a faulty motherboard can be replaced and still
    >> activated because that's a repair, but if it's an upgrade or a
    >> replacement just for the fun of it, that doesn't qualify.
    >>
    >> That takes care of activation.
    >>
    >> The problem of a bios-locked oem cd not running on the new motherboard is
    >> a whole other issue, should a repair install be required.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Rick "Nutcase" Rogers" <rick@mvps.org> wrote in message
    >> news:ePl3XoaFFHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>> Hi Buddy,
    >>>
    >>> If you have a retail version of WindowsXP, then you will be able to
    >>> reactivate on the new hardware. If you have an OEM version (whether that
    >>> be a stand-alone disk bought with a piece of hardware, or a preinstalled
    >>> system), then the change will be seen as a new system, and OEM versions
    >>> are generally permanently tied to the original. In most cases, you will
    >>> not be able to reactivate an OEM version on new hardware.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Best of Luck,
    >>>
    >>> Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
    >>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
    >>> Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
    >>> www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    >>> Windows help - www.rickrogers.org
    >>>
    >>> "Buddy Lunceford" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:1ce701c51599$bdbdf690$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    >>>> I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    >>>> better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    >>>> activate?
    >>>> thanks,
    >>>> bud
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Buddy Lunceford" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:1ce701c51599$bdbdf690$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    > I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    > better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    > activate?
    > thanks,
    > bud


    When I upgraded my motherboard, CPU and AGP graphics card all in one hit, a
    message came up that went something like - "we have noticed you have made
    major hardware changes to your system, click here to re-activate Windows
    XP". Put simply, your MB and CPU upgrade will not be a hassle.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    >-----Original Message-----
    >I'm having problems with my system, can I upgrade to a
    >better mother board and proccessor and still be able to
    >activate?
    > thanks,
    > bud
    >.
    >Hey guys, thanhs for the informative responses! I do
    have retail full version XP Home cd. I have 2 120gig
    drives and inten to reformat the slave and use it for a
    reinstall. That should get around the "pulling the rug"
    thing. I liked that analogy.
    thanks again,
    bud
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