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How hot is too hot for a E6400 CPU?

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January 31, 2007 1:58:24 AM

Hi guys,

I recently built a computer with an E6400 CPU. However, it's been periodically crashing--the screen goes blank. However, the power is still on and the system fan still runs.

I tested my RAM (which is compatible) and both 1 GB modules passed the MemTest86 tests.

I've been monitoring the system temperatures and the core temperatures have been reaching 85C at times, with 75C consistently (like when installing an application or downloading), but sitting at 50-60 when not running anything.

Are these temperatures too hot? I'm using the stock Intel heatsink.

Thanks in advance guys!!!

More about : hot hot e6400 cpu

January 31, 2007 1:59:47 AM

85C is waaay to hot. Go get an aftermarket heatsink now. You'll end up shortening the lifespan of that precious Core 2 Duo too soon.
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January 31, 2007 2:10:42 AM

Quote:
85C is waaay to hot. Go get an aftermarket heatsink now. You'll end up shortening the lifespan of that precious Core 2 Duo too soon.

He doesnt need an aftermarket HS, just needs a reseating of his current HS like JumpingJack said. Even the stock HS should be able to cool the thing to at least safe temperatures...
January 31, 2007 2:14:01 AM

It has been noted that some of the stock heatsinks still don't sit right after multiple resets. The safest thing to do would be to upgrade. A good heatsink could be had for under $30.
January 31, 2007 2:20:51 AM

I agree it is a improperly seated heatsink causing the stability issues. I have not yet been unable to correctly seat the stock heatsink. If he does not want to spend any extra money then by all means he should use the Stock Heatsink but make sure it is seated correctly.

Best way is to attach the heatsink while the board is outside of the chassis. Place board on some cardboard or foam and attached it there. Then look at each black peg is through each hole in the pcb.

I'm running a QX6700 on a stock heatsink. Running about 42 C at desktop.

Alan
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January 31, 2007 2:55:29 AM

Quote:
I've been monitoring the system temperatures and the core temperatures have been reaching 85C at times, with 75C consistently (like when installing an application or downloading), but sitting at 50-60 when not running anything.

Are these temperatures too hot?


For details regarding C2D temps, check out the following topic:

Core 2 Duo Temperature Guide

Hope this helps. 8)
January 31, 2007 2:56:38 AM

I'm using SpeedFan to monitor my system temps... What temperature range should the CPU be staying in?

Do you have any suggestion to rule out the mobo or RAM as a problem? The RAM did pass the MemTest86 tests though...

Thanks!!! Much appreciated. Been getting pretty ticked... but then again, I overestimated my abilities when building the machine :) 

No better way to learn than through mistakes! Just wish they weren't potentially expensive mistakes...
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January 31, 2007 3:08:24 AM

Quote:
I'm using SpeedFan to monitor my system temps... What temperature range should the CPU be staying in?


Once again, for details regarding C2D temps, check out the following topic:

Core 2 Duo Temperature Guide

If you read this, it'll answer your questions. 8)
January 31, 2007 3:56:08 AM

Not sure if that is a valid link. Could you post it again.

Thanks!
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January 31, 2007 4:20:09 AM

I'm using the Asus Silent Knight cooler and its the worst thing to get seated properly. Its as big as a zalman 9500 I think (and based off the same design too) but I get the same temps with it as with the stock cooler. I'm running an e6600 at 42C idle and 67-68C load. So I had to undervolt to get it to run cool. Sometimes if I reseat it I need 4-5 attempts just to make enough contact to keep me under 85C in the BIOS!

EDIT: After undervolt its running in the low-mid 50s load and same idle temps.
January 31, 2007 4:42:01 AM

Quote:
I'm using the Asus Silent Knight cooler and its the worst thing to get seated properly. Its as big as a zalman 9500 I think (and based off the same design too) but I get the same temps with it as with the stock cooler. I'm running an e6600 at 42C idle and 67-68C load. So I had to undervolt to get it to run cool. Sometimes if I reseat it I need 4-5 attempts just to make enough contact to keep me under 85C in the BIOS!

EDIT: After undervolt its running in the low-mid 50s load and same idle temps.

Yes, I don't think these LGA HSF's apply enough pressure to CPU even if seated correctly.

Remember the old 478 - applied so much pressure, MB flexed :wink:
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January 31, 2007 2:52:31 PM

Quote:
I've been monitoring the system temperatures and the core temperatures have been reaching 85C at times, with 75C consistently (like when installing an application or downloading), but sitting at 50-60 when not running anything.

Are these temperatures too hot?


Quote:
I'm using SpeedFan to monitor my system temps... What temperature range should the CPU be staying in?


The following topic details Intel's 2 distinct Thermal Specifications for C2D processors, which programs you can use to test your CPU for proper cooling, describes both normal and abnormal temperatures, and shows a simple temperature scale so you can easily see how your computer behaves.

Core 2 Duo Temperature Guide

Let me know if you have any questions, and I'll be glad to help you. 8)
January 31, 2007 3:11:08 PM

Quote:
85C at times, with 75C consistently (like when installing an application or downloading), but sitting at 50-60 when not running anything.
Are these temperatures too hot?

:lol:  YES! LoL...
My rig idles @ 28C
Maxes out @ 46C (playing Oblivion).
Obviously your cooling is incorrect,
Regards
January 31, 2007 3:24:41 PM

Should I try changing my voltage settings? I'm using the factory defaults for the RAM and the CPU set by the mobo.






Stats:
BFG 650W PS
ECS P965-T Motherboard
OCZ Gold Series 2 GB 800MHz RAM
WD 250GB SATA300 16MB 7200
SEAGATE 120GB ATA100 8MB 7200 (Backup)
ATI X600 128 MB PCI-E 16X
Toshiba 16X DVDRW
January 31, 2007 3:27:36 PM

I've also been getting these blue screens when the system crashes:

1st Crash
A problem has been detected and windos has been shut down to prevent damage:


IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

Beginning physical memory dump

2nd Crash
A problem has been detected and windos has been shut down to prevent damage:


PCIIDEX.SYS

Beginning physical memory dump

3rd Crash
A problem has been detected and windos has been shut down to prevent damage:


ACPI.SYS

Beginning physical memory dump

4th Crash
A problem has been detected and windos has been shut down to prevent damage:


Win32K.SYS

Beginning physical memory dump

And that's when I got fed up and played XBOX instead :) 
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January 31, 2007 4:15:22 PM

Quote:
Should I try changing my voltage settings? I'm using the factory defaults for the RAM and the CPU set by the mobo.


In order for your system to stabilize and operate normally at stock settings, you need to get your temps down into the normal range on the scale. It's very common for one of the CPU cooler legs to be unsecured, when they all appear to be fastened. This is the primary cause for high temp complaints when using Intel's stock C2D cooler.

Carefully reseat the CPU cooler, and double check to be absolutely certain that all four legs are securely clipped all the way through the motherboard. If your temps remain unchanged, then as Jack and Ninja have suggested, deposit the stock cooler into the nearest dumpster, and replace it with a good after market unit.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1683...

Hope this helps. 8)
January 31, 2007 4:45:03 PM

I will give that a try!

Would this involve removing the thermal paste that came already applied to the CPU and reapplying a dab of Artic Silver?

Also, in case my fan sucks, do you have a good recommendation for an after market fan?
January 31, 2007 4:45:22 PM

Also, don't forget the thermal paste. This should be on your stock cooler, but check anyway.
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January 31, 2007 4:54:29 PM

Quote:
Would this involve removing the thermal paste that came already applied to the CPU and reapplying a dab of Artic Silver?


Absolutely, but take care to thoroughly remove the original compound, and remember that only a thin film of AS5 is required.

Quote:
Also, in case my fan sucks, do you have a good recommendation for an after market fan?


If you succeed in getting the stock cooler properly seated, it performs adequately up to a moderate overclock with good case cooling. If you intend to OC to more extreme levels, or if your case cooling is less than ideal, then replace it.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1683...

8)
January 31, 2007 8:42:47 PM

I remove the heatsink, then reseat the same one, do I need to apply new thermal paste?

Thanks!!!
January 31, 2007 10:28:31 PM

I agree with everyone else, re-seat your heat sink and be sure the fan is plugged in correctly.

FYI, My 6400 C2D runs at 29 degrees C idle, and 36 degrees under load. And I'm overclocking it 1050mhz[400x8=3200mhz], and no voltage change. Oh the sweetness....
January 31, 2007 10:31:00 PM

YES, re-apply fresh heat sink compound!! Arctic Silver 5 is one of the best compounds you could use. I recommend it.
January 31, 2007 10:51:31 PM

So it wouldn't be my BFG 650W power supply giving it too much power? Someone told me that, but I figured the system wouldn't complain about too much power...
January 31, 2007 11:28:07 PM

No, your power supply is just fine. See, the power supply in a PC will only push out to the system what is needed and no more than that.

I did forget to mention that I'm using a Cooler Master heatsink/fan combo, but it isn't anything really special. It is still better than the stock Intel heatsink. The problem with your e6400 getting really hot has got to be heatsink/fan related... Unless you changed the CPU voltage settings in the BIOS. Make sure your voltage setting isn't higher than 1.33.
January 31, 2007 11:49:09 PM

Quote:
I recently built a computer with an E6400 CPU. However, it's been periodically crashing--the screen goes blank. However, the power is still on and the system fan still runs.


Hey what motherboard do you have?? Having a CPU run at 85C does create problems, but not as much as you imply. I know because I had mine running that hot.

The LGA775 heatsink/fan is the easiest thing in the world to install, once you learn to install it properly.
February 1, 2007 12:02:17 AM

Oh man, if your Core2 is running that hot, there is something wrong...My roommates and I all switched over to Core2's, we're all overclocking and NONE of us are running any hotter than 43 degrees C under load. Maybe the temps you guys are reading are in degrees F? That would then be a reasonable temp range for a Core2... Here is an idea for both you and the OP; Open up your case while the system is running and touch[carefully] the CPU heatsink. Is it really hot or just warm to the touch?
February 1, 2007 2:51:19 AM

Haha, I wish it was in F, but alas, it is in that crazy C. Another 15 degrees, and I can boil water on top of that baby...

When you guys say load, what is meant by load? What % of CPU usage?

Touch it while it's running? No short out potential?

Thanks!!!
February 1, 2007 3:04:07 AM

Yeah, this was my first full build, not just upgrades...

Does anyone know of a good and free application that will put a load on my CPU?

Is ripping a CD or ecoding a video to divx a good task? Or should I use one of those screen savers like Folding @ Home or SETI @ Home...
February 1, 2007 3:52:12 AM

Intel's Thermal Analysis Tool (TAT) will accurately measure temps, and put any amount of load you desire on the CPU. Supposedly, TAT's 100% load setting puts more load on the CPU than anything else.

http://www.techpowerup.com/downloads/392
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February 1, 2007 6:00:02 AM

Quote:
Does anyone know of a good and free application that will put a load on my CPU?


For those of you with questions regarding testing temperatures:

Core 2 Duo Temperature Guide

Hope this helps. 8)
February 1, 2007 3:08:17 PM

It's an ECS P965T-A.

Thanks!
!