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How to tweak a Lynksys Wireless Router to reach further?

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September 17, 2006 9:06:06 PM

I need to know what can I do to a Linksys Wireless Router for it to have longer reach or otherwise send a stronger signal because the walls of my house are made of concrete and the router's signal decreases substantially as I walk away from it from room to room(using my Lap Top)

Will making the antenas bigger work and if so...how to do it?...or maybe there are more Powerfull routers that have longer reach?.

My Router: WRT54G - V 5 . Thanks.
September 18, 2006 10:35:05 AM

Quote:
I need to know what can I do to a Linksys Wireless Router for it to have longer reach or otherwise send a stronger signal because the walls of my house are made of concrete and the router's signal decreases substantially as I walk away from it from room to room(using my Lap Top)

Will making the antenas bigger work and if so...how to do it?...or maybe there are more Powerfull routers that have longer reach?.

My Router: WRT54G - V 5 . Thanks.


Bigger antenna, more DBI, netstumbler.
September 19, 2006 10:03:47 PM

For starters, don't expect to get Cisco results from a Linksys router. You can try replacing the antennas with high gain antennas, but you would probably get better results by disabling the wireless on the Linksys router entirely and buying a new separate AP.

This lets you keep using the Linksys as your router, but moves the wireless functionality to a different device. You might take a look at the Senao CB3 line of APs. They are a bit more expensive, but still a lot less than a Cisco or Proxim AP. The Linksys specs list output power of the WRT54G as 63 milliwatts. In comparison, the Senao APs are 200 milliwatts.
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September 20, 2006 2:37:13 PM

You can boost the output power for Linksys and other similar routers using 3rd-party firmware such as DD-WRT. The v5 has special needs, but AFAIK, it can still be done.

Note however that this is like overclocking, and you can decrease the life of the device by exceeding the normal output power significantly, and that better antennae are generally preferred to more power output. There are also some parabolic reflector hacks that can be used with existing antennae.

In addition, the router/AP is only one side of the problem; you're likely to get some improvement by having a more sensitive / better transmitting client.

MIMO devices are advertised as having better reflection and obstruction tolerance.

Some WRT54G v5's are thought to be lemons.

DD-WRT / other 3rd-party firmware + another compatible wireless router gives you the option to create a wireless bridge, with clients being connected through a wire through the second wireless router which is configured as a wireless client bridge. This option in theory gets you better radio performance, antennae options and output increasing capability on both ends. But you might still be better off with higher-tech devices, e.g. MIMO, on both ends.

You can also do WDS wireless repeating using DD-WRT / etc., and another compatible wireless router. This is the traditional way of extending range, but it chews up some of the bandwidth in the process.

Before the advent of wireless, all networking had to be wired, so this can be a viable solution, and the rewards for running wire include much better performance, reliability, and security. Wired gigabit >> wireless.
September 20, 2006 6:03:45 PM

Quote:
Wired gigabit >> wireless.


Wired anything >> wireless.
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