Question regarding the Pentium D 805

Like most of you, after reading the article on the Pentium D 805 being overclocked to 4.1GHz, I was impressed and it got me interested. I checked on newegg and this chip is selling for $100 retail and $80 OEM. At this point I was even more impressed.

I desperately need to build a new system (mainly for gaming) while spending as little as possible. The prospect of getting a dual-core system while spending only $80 for a CPU is very tempting.

I would definitely want to OC this chip if I decide to go with it, but not necessarily all the way up to 4.1GHz. More likely around 3.5 or 3.8 and I'll be happy.

Now my question is: does anyone have any suggestions for the other components? ie: MoBo, RAM, PSU, Cooling. Basically trying to find what others have had success with when OC'ing this CPU but without paying an arm and a leg for the other parts. Spending so little for a CPU and then paying over $200 on a MoBo kind of defeats the purpose for me.

I've searched for the MoBo's listed in the article but I cannot find any current online stores that have them. Newegg I believe had one or two of the boards listed, but is currently out of stock. I've seen numerous people on the newegg comment page saying that they OC'ed using an Asus P5ND2-SLI board, but I can't find those at all anymore. And I don't want to end up getting a board for a decent price that doesn't have the OC capabilities required for this CPU. The power supply and cooling are also things that I could use some input on.

If anyone would be kind enough to help a little, I'd greatly appreciate it.
Cheers
31 answers Last reply
More about question pentium
  1. Many new mobos can run old socket 775s at 533 Mhz.
    Don't bother. Any Conroe/Allendale/kentsfield will blow the doors of that 805,
  2. The Core 2 Duo E6300 at stock speed (Linkage)will blow the Pentium D at max overclock outa the water.
    Do yourself a favor, and drop a few extra bucks on the Core 2. You will thank yourself down the road.
  3. February 1, 2007
    PRESS RELEASE
    For immediate release

    Battle Creek, MI - Kelloggs Cereals today announced a special promotion in conjunction with Intel. Boxes of Raisin Bran, Frosted Flakes and Lucky Charms will contain a free Pentium D 805...

    :D
  4. Quote:
    February 1, 2007
    PRESS RELEASE
    For immediate release

    Battle Creek, MI - Kelloggs Cereals today announced a special promotion in conjunction with Intel. Boxes of Raisin Bran, Frosted Flakes and Lucky Charms will contain a free Pentium D 805...

    :D


    ROTFL
  5. Quote:
    February 1, 2007
    PRESS RELEASE
    For immediate release

    Battle Creek, MI - Kelloggs Cereals today announced a special promotion in conjunction with Intel. Boxes of Raisin Bran, Frosted Flakes and Lucky Charms will contain a free Pentium D 805...

    :D


    LOL. nice.
  6. Thats gettin close enough to "SIG level funny."
    TOMS need to add a few disclaimers to the end of that article linking to the Core 2 overclocking write up. And explain that the Netburt series should not EVER be considered for ANY build EVER again.
  7. I'll be gentle - the 805 is simply not a great CPU. If you're going to build a new system it is well worth the extra money to get a Core 2 Duo processor - even an entry level model. You'll need a socket 775 board and DDR2 RAM anyways so you might as well go just a little bit further and get a processor that you'll be happy with.

    I speak from experience. Last summer, I went from an 805 to a D 915 to an E6400 in just a matter of weeks. The 805 (overclocked like it needs to be) was a furnace, prompting me to buy the Zalman cooler that you see in my sig. The D 915 was more satisfying but I really wanted a C2D, which my then current board, an ASUS P5LD2 didn't support. A guy at my office wanted to buy a Pentium D rig from Dell so I made him an offer that he couldn't (and didn't) refuse which gave me the cash to buy my present rig. NOW I am happy!

    Sometimes you can get a lot more for just a little more. This is one of those cases.
  8. You might save $80 on the CPU, but your new air conditioner will probably run $450. If you already needed a $300 air conditioner, that extra $150 gets you the capacity you need.

    Supposing that you just vent the heat from that overclocked Pentium-D out a hole in the wall, you still need to pay for the extra power. Maybe $10 a month. Eight months later and your $80 is gone.

    Not to mention the effect on global warming...
  9. The 805 is not a good gaming processor, it is a media encoding bargain. If you want a <$100 Intel gaming CPU go for one of the 65nm Celeron Ds and overclock that. You'll have a much better chance of cranking up the MHz on it, and it doesn't tax your motherboard or power supply like the D 805 does to get great clocks. If you have the budget to get the E4300, buy it.

    If you could care less about having to have an intel rig, I suggest an X2 3600, 1.9GHz am2. On a decent board they should at least overclock to ~2.6GHz.
  10. Quote:
    Thats gettin close enough to "SIG level funny."
    TOMS need to add a few disclaimers to the end of that article linking to the Core 2 overclocking write up. And explain that the Netburt series should not EVER be considered for ANY build EVER again.


    Hey, I try... :lol:

    The complete obsolescence of the Netburst series is the main reason why I'm so stunned that Intel has pulled the Pentium name out of the trashcan again. Why in heaven's name would they want to tie that turkey to new CPUs???
  11. Get yourself at least an Athlon64 X2 3600+ for gaming; OC-ed @ 2.6GHz on stock cooler it just blows away a 3.6-3.8GHz 805 while you will still need at least a good ~$45 aftermarket HSF (not to say $100 liquid cooling) to properly cool a 805.
  12. Agreed with M25, and all the rest. If you can't afford the Core 2 chips, well, don't waste you cash on a Pentium ANYTHING(netburst based), unless of course you get it for free in a box of cereal :wink: .... Anyway, if money is the issue, build the AMD system, if not go with Core 2.

    wes
  13. I'm just wondering how long will the 805 myth (coupled with the multi-GHz overclock myth) live... that thing was great only when it was sold for $150 and the cheapest X2 (the 3800+) was ~$300; you had a dual core for what was considered dirt cheap.
  14. Look broz...

    The only reason the 805 @ 4Ghz was that amazing was cos at the time there WAS NO CONROE.

    I understand price is a concern, but if there is ANY way u can get a 6300 instead DO IT. I had an 805 also, ran it on a zalman beetle, and on max it was stable at ~3.6.

    U can always get a Mobo that supports C2D and swap the chip when u get some more $$$.

    Bottom line... if possible avoid all 8xx and to a lesser extent 9xx chips.
  15. It needs to die. Really, the only thing that let that damn cpu live was it's price. But now, that isn't even enough. But still, people keep on talking about it as if it is a top performer. Well, soon enough they will stop making/selling them....

    wes
  16. Well, I guess that answers that. lol
    I figured that the new C2D's would blow the 805 away, but I still thought the 805 might be worthwhile in a sense, guess not.

    I did like the line about the 805 in cereal boxes. Funny stuff.

    I've had a P4 for so very long, and I was finally getting ready to make the switch to AMD since it was long considered the king of CPU's in terms of gaming (which is what I do mainly). But then Intel had to go and screw things up and release the C2D series that, from what I have been seeing the past few months, stole the crown from AMD not only in terms of games, but in general as well.

    If I was going to go with a C2D, is there a huge difference between the Allendale and Conroe chips? Besides the lower FSB of the Allendale, I can't see any big difference between the Allendale E4300 and the Conroe E6300. At the same time however, on newegg currently the E6300 is only 10 bucks more than the E4300, so even if the difference it won't break the bank. Can anyone suggest some moderately priced MoBo's that would work well with the E6300? Something that might allow for some moderate overclocking.

    Alternatively, I am still tempted to go with AMD and get an AM2 chip and board. It's cheaper, and I still have faith that AMD will be able to dust itself off and release something to compete with C2D. I was looking at the X2 3800+ 2.0GHz Windsor (EE) chip in particular. Currently 135 bucks on newegg. This should still be a decent chip right? I'm not looking to play Oblivion at max res and settings or anything, just something that will provide good FPS and at least moderate eye-candy. Are there any good boards that I should look at for the 3800?

    Sorry for all the questions, I'm just trying to catch up with all the new goings-on in the PC hardware world. Haven't kept up with it for about 2 years and I'm pretty much lost at this point. I'm trying though.

    Just a couple more questions for now.

    If AMD does release a new series to combat C2D, it will still be an AM2 socket chip right? And since FSB is basically N/A with AMD boards, most MoBo's should be able to support a new chip as long as it's got the socket right?

    Also, are there any rumors of price drops in either camp at all? Just curious. I would hate to shell out the dough (even if it is only 135 for a 3800) and then find out that prices dropped just a couple weeks later or something.

    Anyway, thanks a bunch for all the input! I can use all I can get. My current system is about to implode...and I'm not exaggerating. 8O
  17. The next generation AMD chips will be compatable with AM2. However, with AM2 they won't be able to use the next gen hypertransport bus. But, the difference in dual core performance with and without the higher speed HTT bus is marginal if any. For quad core it might be necessary. The dual core AMD chips which are currently out are still fast chips. They do get trounced a bit by Core 2, but, for the majority of people they are plenty fast. I do remember reading a rumor of more AMD price drops, but, that might already have happend, so I am not really sure for them.

    For Intel setups, you will have to ask an Intel guy. I have very little experience with the newest Intel related hardware so I am not the best source.

    For AMD motherboards, I would go with an DFI or Asus. If you are not overclocking there are many more choices. However, the Asus boards which I have owned were a bit more stable than the DFI boards, but, they didn't have quite the OC headroom as the DFI counterparts. Anyway, I am sure one of the members will chime in on the Intel related setup questions you had.

    wes

    Edit: you might want to put in how much you want to spend in total, or make it a little easier and put how much you want to spend on each component.
  18. Quote:
    I did like the line about the 805 in cereal boxes. Funny stuff.


    Just don't ask Baron about the conductive properties of packing CPUs in corn flakes...

    JUST KIDDIN' BARON! DON'T SHOOT ME WITH YOUR MATRIX GUN! NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooooooooooo...

    :lol:
  19. Quote:
    It needs to die. Really, the only thing that let that damn cpu live was it's price. But now, that isn't even enough. But still, people keep on talking about it as if it is a top performer. Well, soon enough they will stop making/selling them....

    wes

    It's not a top performer.
    But not anybody needs a top performing CPU.
    Gamers aside, which can always use as much performance as they can get, people buy computers to perform specific tasks.
    If all you do is surf the internet, or need a file server, buy a 30$ Sempron, not a 165$ E6300!
    If you want to build an HTPC on the cheap, that's where PDs are great!
    Cause you get good encoding/decoding performance, and you *need* a dual core for HDTV.
    Just, if this is the scenario, i'd recommend the PD 915 instead, which has the same overclocking performance, costs rougly 10 bucks more, but runs significantly cooler, being 65nm and supporting EnhancedSpeedStep.
    Also you can always upgrade you system to a C2D some months or 1 year later, if you happen to need it, by just replacing the CPU.
    If you have some spare / cheap DDR1 memory, you can pair your PD with an ASRock 775dual-vsta.
  20. Quote:

    If you want to build an HTPC on the cheap, that's where PDs are great!


    Hardly. Most HTPC cases aren't designed to manage that kind of heat, and most HTPC users won't tolerate the added noise from cooling.

    Perhaps your line of thinking is more applicable to media-oriented desktops. At a desk. Away from the home theater. Perhaps in a server closet.
  21. Pippero,

    I do understand what you are saying, but, if you are planning on OCing the 805 or 915 to achieve the desired results, why wouldn't you OC the AMD based CPU to do the same. If you put a Pentium D up against K8, it would need to have a 1400Mhz clock advantage in order to break even with it. So, with the 915 being $10 less than the X2 3600 and only about $30 less than the X2 3800, I still don't think I would be able to recommend it. You would have to OC the hell out of the 915, and if you OC'ed the 3600 it would still probably outperform the 915 with both at max OC's(on air). It might be close, but, IMO, I think the $10 extra is worth it.

    wes

    Edit: the 915 might perform about the same as the 3600 if both were at stock, but, if you were going to bother OCing the 915 to beat it, why not OC the 3600. If you did, the only way the 915 would be better is if you OC'ed it to above 4.4ghz. I am not saying the 915 couldn't go higher than 4.4, just saying on air it would be tough. All the AMD cpu's I have used would hit max OC on air. The 950 is about on par with the 3800, and it's clocked at 3.4ghz....
  22. There are some nice cases from Thermaltake with 3 fans which would suit that pretty well.
    And of course i wouldn't recommend overclocking those systems, if you want to use them for an HTPC.
    But a PD 915 with ESpeedStep enabled should work well in an HTPC.
  23. Quote:
    Pippero,

    I do understand what you are saying, but, if you are planning on OCing the 805 or 915 to achieve the desired results, why wouldn't you OC the AMD based CPU to do the same. If you put a Pentium D up against K8, it would need to have a 1400Mhz clock advantage in order to break even with it. So, with the 915 being $10 than the X2 3600, I still don't think I would be able to recommend it. You would have to OC the hell out of the 915, and if you OC'ed the 3600 it would still probably outperform the 915 with both at max OC's. It might be close, but, IMO, I think the $10 extra is worth it.

    wes

    Agreed, the X2 3600 is an excellent choice.
    However where i live, the price difference between a PD and X2 is a bit more substantial.
    But the main point is about the platform, with a PD you have a clear upgrade path towards a C2D or C2Q, with an X2 the situation is a bit more confused.
    Also, in my case i'm leaning toward a PD for my upcoming HTPC because i already have some unused DDR memory, and Socket 939 X2s are much more expensive than their DDR2 counterparts.
  24. It's cool. Those cpu's do have uses, they just won't have any in my house. I really wouldn't recommend any of the above to anyone atm, unless price is a concern. As far as upgrade path, K8L dual core atleast, should be drop in with AM2 boards. Granted, we really don't know, and we know(typo) nothing of K8L performance, so, I couldn't even recommend someone choose that as an upgrade path. Oh well, hard to decide, I can't even decide atm. I am a fan of the greenteam, so, I am hoping K8L will be killer. If it isn't I am going with Core 2.... we shall soon see.

    wes
  25. I do believe K8L will rock on servers, and i just hope it will be competitive in desktops (clock speed here is the main unknown factor).
    What i'm not sure about is this whole AM2+ -> AM2 compatibility issue.
    For performance, i'm convinced the AM2+ socket is not needed on the desktop.
    But i wonder if there's gonna be any quirks with using an AM2+ CPU on an AM2 mobo.
  26. Well,

    It's my opinion that if indeed K8L can take back the entire server market from low to high end, then it will compete on the desktop. Sure, K8L might be the best above say 2p, but, for AMD to be successful I think they need the new Uarch to be competitive in all areas like K8 was. The only place K8 wasn't as competitive was in the notebook market, only because of power draw and competing against a well established Intel marketing campaign(and AMD not having one). I do think K8L will compete in every sector, but, I have no basis to state that as a fact since I have not seen and benchmarks on it, only the PR numbers. Seeing is beleiving IMO, so I will wait to do more than speculate.

    wes

    Edit: going to bed, work tonight.
  27. K8L will compete in all markets, of course.
    But on server they can leverage the memory bandwidth and latency and the platform architecture, while on desktops, clock speed will be more important.
    My concern is, Intel could probably release 3.3 GHz parts already on 65nm, and on 45nm, well...
  28. Someone suggested that I post the price range I'm looking at, so I thought I would actually post the components that I had in mind.

    So far this system totals at just under $600 or $560, depending on which CPU I go with. This is the AMD setup I was thinking about. Some of the components have rebates which is always nice.

    MoBo $90
    GIGABYTE GA-M55SLI-S4 Socket AM2 NVIDIA nForce4 SLI ATX AMD Motherboard
    -This seems like a decent board from what I can tell. One thing I need in a MoBo is 1394 for my iPod and external HD's. Too bad 1394 is becoming more and more scarce. It's also nForce but only 4 series, but it's still nForce, which is something I've wanted for a while. It also has 2 ATA plugs plus 4 SATA 3GB plugs. What I was thinking was to stick with my current ATA HDD and my DVDROM + CD-RW drives for now, in an effort to keep the overall cost as low as possible. Which is why I had to find a board with 2 ATA plugs, which isn't too easy anymore. At some point I will definitely want to get a SATA drive or two and get a RAID setup, but for now I don't see sticking with ATA being that detrimental to performance overall.

    CPU - Choice #1 - $170
    AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+(65W) Windsor 2.2GHz 2 x 512KB L2 Cache Socket AM2 Processor
    -I'm not sure if there would be a huge difference between this CPU and the one below. I could probably OC the 3800 but maybe it's better to just get the 4200? Not sure. I made sure that they were both the (EE) 65W versions, so they suck less power.

    CPU - Choice #2 - $135
    AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+(65W) Windsor 2.0GHz 2 x 512KB L2 Cache Socket AM2 Processor

    RAM $111
    CORSAIR XMS2 1GB (2 x 512MB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit
    -Tried to make sure it was a big name brand for the RAM. I may have fallen behind in PC hardware, but some things never change, and generic no-name RAM is always a bad idea. I would at some point get another Gig of this to make it 2GB total RAM.

    Video Card $150 after rebate
    XFX PVT71PUDP3 GeForce 7900GS 256MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 EXTREME
    -The Video card, well, I normally wouldn't get a GS and would have liked a 7900 GT or something, but they are a bit more. It seemed to me that this was still a decent card. Any thoughts?

    Case $30 after rebate
    COOLER MASTER Centurion 532 RC-532-SKN1 Black Aluminum bezel, SECC chassis ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
    -I can't stomach the thought of spending $300 on a case, but I didn't want a $20 case that falls apart either. This was appealing since it looks nice (IMO) and has a rebate. :)

    PSU $45 after rebate
    APEVIA ATX-AS520W-BK ATX 520W Power Supply 115/230 V CB IEC 950/ TUV EN 60950/ UL 1950/ CSA 950
    -Again, from what I can tell this seems like a good PSU and it doesn't cost $150. Maybe I'm wrong?

    Any input or changes would be greatly appreciated. I would really like to stay below $600 and even less if at all humanly possible. I don't necessarily need all the best parts now obviously, but at least something to get me by for a year or so and something I can easily upgrade later piece by piece.
  29. Allendale and Conroe chips are basically the same.
    Allendale's have 2 megs cache, run a 800 FSB, and don't have Visualization. But they also have a higher multiplier (than low-end Conroes). This is minor.
  30. I don't suggest any AMD X2 with a new PC. The X2s where great in their day and they are a great way to upgrade if you already have a 939 or AM2. A low-end Conroe will still be faster and use fewer watts. Low-end conroes can overclock high as well. 8)
  31. enewmen, he is on a budget, and would like to save as much as possible. With that in mind, the best route for him would probably be an AM2 system.

    Fueled by Ramen,

    If you go the AMD route, I would go with either the X2 3800 or the X2 3600.
    You could OC both of them to or near 3ghz. The 4200 is not worth it imo.

    wes
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