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775 Clip Pressure (How much?)

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February 1, 2007 3:07:21 AM

Does anybody have any recommendations on how to judge whether your waterblock is mounted to tight? Aside from spending $200 for a torque wrench or driver, is there anyway to guesstimate how much to screw down a waterbock? I see the intel specs say 18 - 70 lbf. 70 lbf seems high but if they say it can handle it, I'll have to take their word at this point. I am using the thermaltake kandalf's integrated cooling solution. Using my thumb and side of my forfinger I have tightened it to the point where it will not turn easily (all 4 thumb screws equally). It seems that this is very tight. I know that the cover on the dual core processor should protect the core's somewhat, but should I be concerned?

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February 1, 2007 3:27:47 AM

I don't anything about water cooling equipment, but I'm using a large HSF on my CPU which uses clips. These clips clamp down onto the bracket really tightly. The amount of force that must be applied to a flimsy looking plastic bracket (which is screwed onto the MB) is unnerving.

I don't believe you need to worry. 8)
February 1, 2007 4:11:32 AM

Quote:
I don't anything about water cooling equipment, but I'm using a large HSF on my CPU which uses clips. These clips clamp down onto the bracket really tightly. The amount of force that must be applied to a flimsy looking plastic bracket (which is screwed onto the MB) is unnerving.

I don't believe you need to worry. 8)


I was so nervous the first time I installed a heatsink cause I had the metal clips with springs.....it took so much force. When it turned out my CPU was DOA I thought I had done something wrong, but no the old one worked and was not a fault due to pressure.

It takes ALOT! I would recommend using a torque wrench if you aren't sure, I'm a mechanic so they come easy. If you don't use them that often you can rent the tool. Or be like me and guesstimate it most the time, just don't strip any threads if you can avoid it.
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February 1, 2007 4:50:53 AM

I wish I knew someone with a torque wrench... It would be a quick answer. I've thought about buying one and just returning it after checking, but obviously that isn't the most honest thing to do. I'm very familiar with the spring clips from air coolers. This is significantly more pressure than those produce. I guess until I start having problem's I won't worry about it.

Thanks for your insite :!:
a b K Overclocking
February 1, 2007 4:52:57 AM

Remember that threads exert tremendous force: It should only take a couple INCH POUNDS of twisting force to add many FOOT POUNDS of bending force.

Try wiggling the block, if it feels tight it probably is.
February 1, 2007 5:11:06 AM

Exactly why I was inquiring... Your advice sounds logical and I am going to re-mount the waterblock paying attention to when the water block will no longer twist. My only concern is that I am using arctic silver 5 and it is like a fricken lubricant. I think it will make the waterblock moveable even with a large amount of pressure. Once again its probably going to be a mater of good judgement or $200 for a torque wrench...
a b K Overclocking
February 1, 2007 5:22:03 AM

It will always twist. It shouldn't rock however. I have smashed an LGA775 socket before, doing what you're attempting.
February 1, 2007 8:28:05 AM

Quote:
Exactly why I was inquiring... Your advice sounds logical and I am going to re-mount the waterblock paying attention to when the water block will no longer twist. My only concern is that I am using arctic silver 5 and it is like a fricken lubricant. I think it will make the waterblock moveable even with a large amount of pressure. Once again its probably going to be a mater of good judgement or $200 for a torque wrench...


My arctic silver 5 I just used to re-install my celeron when my p4 northwood was DOA seemed pretty thick. Much thicker than I would expect. Of course I only apply to the cpu and not that much.
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