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Question about resolution limitations of certain cables

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 1, 2007 7:08:41 PM

Heres my situation:
I will be buying either an 8800 GTS or R600 equilavent and connecting to a Samsung LN-S4695D 46" LCD. Ideally I would want to hook up via HDMI but the 8800 GTS does not have that type of connection so my choices are either VGA or component since no DVI connection is located on the Samsung.
So my question is this: What maximum resolution can I expect to get out of the VGA connection or Component connection and which would be the better choice?
Other points to consider are this: I cannot use a DVI to HDMI adapter according to the manual to hook up a PC.
Max resolution on the TV itself is 1980 X 1080.

Thanks in advance for any help!
February 1, 2007 7:13:00 PM

VGA or component can handle those high resolutions.
a b U Graphics card
February 1, 2007 8:21:49 PM

Personally I'd go with VGA, because the same length of Component is going to be expensive for quality cables.
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February 1, 2007 8:31:19 PM

Thanks for the info guys.
To Grapeape: I have a series 3 Monster Component set already so cost isnt an issue with that cable. Do you think either cable type will provide a better overall quality? The 8800 GTS looks to have an S-video to component out on the back which makes me wonder if the quality would suffer because of the conversion.
a b U Graphics card
February 1, 2007 8:56:47 PM

First it's not converting the signal, it's component off a hybrid connector. It has more pins than S-Video.

The only thing to worry about is connector quality, but really if you already have good cables, then stick with the component dongle first, and if you don't like it, then go the DB-15/VGA route, but both should be fine.

Svideo;
http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-...

Hybrid;
http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/14-...

Alot of people confuse the two.
a b U Graphics card
February 1, 2007 9:41:20 PM

According to whose manual, the LCD manufacturer? Forget that, DVI to HDMI works fine.

There have always been issues with DVI overscan, so you might need to make a few adjustments. Also, you may or may not be HCDP compliant.

One thing for certain: If you plan to view HD-DVD and/or BRD content, VGA or Component Video won't do the job. HDCP forces analog display resolutions down to SDTV levels.

VGA and Component carry basically the same signals, I prefer VGA cables but most home theater guys like Component.
February 1, 2007 10:57:45 PM

Yup, it was the manufacturer manual that stated DVI to HDMI wouldnt work for PC connections but go into any specifics as to why.
I am glad you mentioned the HD-DVD/BRD content over VGA lowering the resolution due to HDCP. I was eventually going with an HD-DVD drive in the comp but that would be useless until I had a straight HDMI to HDMI connection if I am understanding it correctly.
The TV-out looked just like S-video. I should have looked closer.
I am going to try the component video connection when the card arrives.

Thanks for all the info guys. You were a ton of help.
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2007 12:03:34 AM

HCDP can be done over DVI, but I'm not sure whether DVI to HDMI adapters kill the process or not.

As for display manfucturer's, their advice concerning PC to TV cannot be trusted: They've said in the past that VGA from computers wouldn't work on the VGA input because of refresh rates (but the default refresh rate DOES work) and that DVI from computers wouldn't work with HDTV and EDTV because of resolution issues (even though the correct resolutions can be chosen from display options).

I'd try an HDMI to DVI adapter.
February 2, 2007 2:48:43 AM

HDCP works fine w/ DVI to HDMI adapters... i'm using one right now on my TV.

As for DVI to HDMI not working, it sounds like B.S. to me. I'd give it a go... those cables are about $10 on ebay.

Furthermore, if it doesn't work, use component cables. Like someone said earlier, hd-dvd and bluray players will lower the resolution over digital connections if the HDCP handshake doesn't happen. however, component cables will not. so you can still get 1080i over component cables... and all video cards support component out these days.

IMO, the difference between 1080i HDMI and component is unnoticable. only downside is u can't do 1080p over component... (i think)
a b U Graphics card
February 2, 2007 3:20:21 AM

mpjesse, the resolution is supposed to be dropped WHENEVER the chain of HDCP compliancy is broken, INCLUDING during the use of analog signals like VGA or Component Video.
!