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Dual Booting Vista-64 and XP pro on software Raid 0

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February 1, 2007 10:14:24 PM

I was wondering if it would be feasible to dual boot 64 bit Vista Home Premium and 32 bit XP Pro on the same RAID 0 setup. Right now I have XP on an 80 gig C: partition and a G: partition for storage( ~ 400 gigs), which I was thinking of installing Vista on if it would work. Im using a Gigabyte 965 DS3 with a JMicron raid controller. Thanks!
February 1, 2007 10:40:02 PM

I'm guessing that you have an upgrade edition of Vista, and that your 32 bit xp pro is the OS you're upgrading from.

When you install vista upgrade it overwrites the old installed windows (XP) and invalidates its CD key, so your old XP OS won't be licenced any more. If you try and reinstall it, you won't get past the authentication because your old XP CD key won't ever be valid again.

I guess the trick would be to install an older windows if you have it lying around, and upgrade from that. That way, vista blows away a key you don't want anyway instead of your XP one.

As far as I can find, you can't use an upgrade edition to go from anything older than windows 2000 so upgrading from windows 95, 98 or ME are out. So you'd need to have an old copy of 2000 lying around you don't mind blowing away forever.

If you actually have two seperate licences for Vista and XP, its probably possible to do a dual-boot (at least it is with xp and older/other windows that aren't vista ).
February 1, 2007 10:52:09 PM

I don't see why you shouldn't be able to do such a feat. One stumbling block you may have, however, is getting your Vista install to work with your raid array. (or at least I had such a problem trying to install Vista 64-bit RC2... but I could just be dumb)

I was unable to find a set of raid drivers for the on-board controller on my A8N-SLi that would actually work (mind you, this was when RC2 first came out) so I ended up just installing the 32-bit RC2 instead, from within XP Pro. It pulled the raid driver from the existing O/S and installed fine.

Driver support should be much better now though (I hope... although it is only a couple days old officially)
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February 1, 2007 11:22:33 PM

I want to get a new non-upgrage license for 64 bit Vista home premium. (I have a $100 Dell Small Business Coupon I have to use by March 1) My thought is that XP is working pretty well for me, but I will want to take advantage of DX10 this summer when Crysis comes out and SupCom & COH get DX10 patches. I have this large partition doing nothing really, so I figured why not install Vista on it so I can play games in either XP or Vista whichever the game works better for. Anyway, that's where I'm coming from. Thanks for your input/advice.
February 2, 2007 3:20:24 PM

Also, if I do try to install Vista 64 should I do it from within XP or use floppies for drivers and install directly from the Vista installation disk?
February 2, 2007 4:30:04 PM

There is a Vista section on this forum in Software.

Already some fairly comprehensive stuff there.
February 2, 2007 4:48:17 PM

WTF?

You know that RAID 0 = less than 0 redundancy.

I hope you have no important data on your RAID array.
February 2, 2007 5:59:45 PM

The x64 upgrade of Vista is not really an upgrade persay as it has to install clean.

Easiest procedure to do an upgrade without XP installed (and likely in this case as well) is to:

Boot with vista dvd, choose custom install, do NOT enter your cd key and make sure that you uncheck to 'Automatically validate windows when on line" and install to your other partition. When the installation is complete, boot into vista and then run setup again and do the 'upgrade' over top of your current vista system, this time entering your cd key.
February 2, 2007 11:02:37 PM

Quote:
monkeymanuk

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WTF?

You know that RAID 0 = less than 0 redundancy.

I hope you have no important data on your RAID array.



Everything that is important gets backed up to a storage drive. I think I've got it all figured out except for one thing; I don't know how the RAID controller will determine which OS to boot into. Anyways, I'll try it out and keep update this thread with my results.
February 2, 2007 11:52:53 PM

The thread title and your post say a bit different things. If it is software RAID you're running, then it is the XP software that makes the RAID work, and unless by some lucky chance Vista can understand that format, even during install, you probably won't be able to use the drive.

If you're using a hardware controller, it is a question of drivers.

If you only have an upgrade Vista CD, then do the workaround people are suggesting (as in install as trial and register later)
February 3, 2007 12:03:55 AM

I'm using the Jmicron controller off the Gigabyte 965 DS3. I was under the impression that this is not true hardware RAID, but software RAID. There are Vista x64 drivers for this controller and my motherboard, so is it correct to say that RAID is, in this instance, hardware RAID??
February 3, 2007 12:40:45 AM

Quote:
I'm using the Jmicron controller off the Gigabyte 965 DS3. I was under the impression that this is not true hardware RAID, but software RAID. There are Vista x64 drivers for this controller and my motherboard, so is it correct to say that RAID is, in this instance, hardware RAID??

If you've got XP 32 bit already loaded and a space cleared out to install Vista, you're half way there. Make sure you've got the Jmicron F6 driver already on a floppy. In BIOS, make your CD/DVD drive one of the first boot devices, before your hard drive. Load the Vista DVD in your drive and restart your comp. When it comes time, load the RAID driver. You should see your RAID array as an option to put Vista on. Just designate Vista to load on an empty partition, behind the XP partition. It'll take care of the dual boot setup for you. Don't forget to make the hard drive "first boot" again once all is installed.

I did the same thing with Vista RC1.....was pretty painless.
February 3, 2007 11:39:57 AM

Thanks, RJ. That's what I had kind of concluded, but just needed some sort of confirmation.
February 4, 2007 2:23:52 AM

Ummm... an OS has to be installed on a primary partition. One can have up to four primary partitions on any physical hard drive. Only one primary partition can be active at any time. This is how multi-boot systems are actually set up and operate. To the best of my knowledge, it is not possible to have more than one primary partition on any RAID array. Your proposed setup will not work correctly.

RAID 0 has no fault tolerance. Installing your OS on a RAID 0 is insane, IMHO.
February 4, 2007 7:34:22 PM

Quote:
Ummm... an OS has to be installed on a primary partition. One can have up to four primary partitions on any physical hard drive. Only one primary partition can be active at any time. This is how multi-boot systems are actually set up and operate. To the best of my knowledge, it is not possible to have more than one primary partition on any RAID array. Your proposed setup will not work correctly.

RAID 0 has no fault tolerance. Installing your OS on a RAID 0 is insane, IMHO.


The setup will work fine.

A RAID array is a logical drive. You can do anything to the logical drive that you can do to a physical drive, including create multiple partitions, installing boot managers, etc.

Yes, RAID 0 has no redundancy. It's purpose is purely for speed. Installing the OS itself on a RAID 0 array isn't inherently bad. The risk of data loss is higher, but if it's only the OS (plus some applications) then a crashed array just buys you a Windows & applications reinstall. No biggie if you have the time.

Of course, I wouldn't put anything important on a RAID 0 unless it was backed up somewhere else.
February 5, 2007 10:42:31 AM

Thanks Joe. I I think I'll give it a shot sometime soon. BTW which boot manager do you reccommend?
February 5, 2007 1:43:24 PM

Vista will detect the previous installation of Windows XP and create a boot.ini file which will have both operating systems selectable in it. This is a very basic boot manager, but it does work.

For finer control of the boot process, I have used BootMagic, which is included with Symantec's Norton Partition Magic. It will allow you to auto-hide partitions & drive letters when booting a particular operating system. I don't know if it's compatible with Vista, however.
February 5, 2007 6:33:52 PM

Fantastic. That about answers all of my questions. Thanks for the input & advice. I guess I'll live on the edge and have an OS on RAID 0. I hope my PC doesn't explode. :) 
February 7, 2007 12:12:41 PM

Everything is up and running fine. I'm Using Vista x86 on the second partition until I get the 64 bit disc from Microsoft and I can still get into XP just like old times via MS's boot manager. It was as easy as puting in the Vista disc, loading the Raid drivers off the floppy, selecting the partition I wanted to use, and clicking install. Thanks again for the info and advice.
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