Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

CRT or Plasma for 8hr/day TV watcher?

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
June 21, 2004 12:10:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi all,

My household watches approx 8 hrs/day of TV. I want to buy a HDTV so
would a CRT or Plasma suit me better? My gut says plasma's lifespan
has yet to be proven....Am I right?

Thanks in advance
Anonymous
June 21, 2004 11:44:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hank wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> My household watches approx 8 hrs/day of TV. I want to buy a HDTV so
> would a CRT or Plasma suit me better? My gut says plasma's lifespan
> has yet to be proven....Am I right?
>
> Thanks in advance

Hank:

I am a Sony 34" CRT HDTV fan......

Since you mention HDTV.... means 16:9 format.... and not extended
Definition...

The largest CRT HD sets are 34" Diagonal.... Highest Price is
$2400.
The new Sony 34XBR960 (2005 Model) has all the features plus....

For Plasma.... Non HD sets (called ED)... run up to $4400.
For Plasma... HDTV sets run $4600 and up for 42" and up diagonal
Plasma requires an extended warranty since the cost to repair can
be Big.
IF money is no big deal.. An 'HD' Plasma has the biggest wow
factor
for the time the unit functions..... Fear, uncertainty, &
doubt
included.....
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 6:55:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

If anything Technology now brings you a much quicker life span, either
through technology advances or shorter life span through planned
obsolescence, it just doesn't look good for us consumers. I've had some old
black & whites, over 20 years and about 15 for some colors. The last TV
bought in 97, expired this year. I'd feel happy keeping anything 10 years,
that I paid for.

Personally, I'd go with CRT for about 5 years, then look at the new/older
plasmas (2 year spread)


"Hank" <hank755_ca@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:58619410.0406201910.1c1a01d1@posting.google.com...
> Hi all,
>
> My household watches approx 8 hrs/day of TV. I want to buy a HDTV so
> would a CRT or Plasma suit me better? My gut says plasma's lifespan
> has yet to be proven....Am I right?
>
> Thanks in advance
Related resources
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 7:08:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Actually, CRT rear-projection is best suited for someone who watches a lot
of varied programming. Watching varied programming will prevent burn-in (one
of the only weaknesses of CRT technology), so CRT rear projection really is
better suited for your needs than someone who would only be watching a few
hours a day and a few movies a week. Current CRT rear-projection technology
is designed to last about 10 years if you were to watch 8 hours a day, every
day. At that point the set would be running at about 1/2 the
brightness/contrast level of when it was new. You could still keep it
around, but it would be past its prime at that point.

In terms of life-span Plasma is at least as short as CRT rear-projection.
I'm not a tech, but I can quote a few reliable sources. The benefit of
Plasma is it's compact size, that's about it.

DLP rear projection and LCD displays as your best bet if you want something
that will last a lifetime (literaly), but technology ten years from now will
probably justify a new purchase (yet another reason not to sink $5000+ into
a HDTV right now).

-Jeremy


"Hank" <hank755_ca@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:58619410.0406201910.1c1a01d1@posting.google.com...
> Hi all,
>
> My household watches approx 8 hrs/day of TV. I want to buy a HDTV so
> would a CRT or Plasma suit me better? My gut says plasma's lifespan
> has yet to be proven....Am I right?
>
> Thanks in advance
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 9:17:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Major brands like Fujitsu, Pioneer, Panasonic, Sony publish their
plasma half-life estimate at 30000 hours minimum. That's about 15
years of normal viewing before a newer plasma set loses 50% of its
brightness. Simply adjust the brightness and contrast settings from
the default "torch" mode to extend lifespan even more.
Burn-in is not an issue for normal viewing, unless you have the stock
tickers running 8 hours.
You can buy the Panasonic TH42PWD6UY for $2500, some stores will offer
a free mount (check out visualapex.com). You'll need speakers and it
doesn't have a tuner, so basically you only have a monitor but the PQ
is awesome. Colors are vivid, details are sharp and black levels is
on par with CRT.
All technology will offer something. They all have strength and
weaknesses. Size is not the only strength that plasma has.
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 6:21:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"mdt1834" <MTRAN@DIR.CA.GOV> wrote in message
news:36fe47c7.0406231617.22ccabc@posting.google.com...
> Major brands like Fujitsu, Pioneer, Panasonic, Sony publish their
> plasma half-life estimate at 30000 hours minimum. That's about 15
> years of normal viewing before a newer plasma set loses 50% of its
> brightness. Simply adjust the brightness and contrast settings from
> the default "torch" mode to extend lifespan even more.
> Burn-in is not an issue for normal viewing, unless you have the stock
> tickers running 8 hours.
> You can buy the Panasonic TH42PWD6UY for $2500, some stores will offer
> a free mount (check out visualapex.com). You'll need speakers and it
> doesn't have a tuner, so basically you only have a monitor but the PQ
> is awesome. Colors are vivid, details are sharp and black levels is
> on par with CRT.
> All technology will offer something. They all have strength and
> weaknesses. Size is not the only strength that plasma has.

Where do Sony and Panasonic publish life estimates? I'd love to see that
they actually commit to a number.

Leonard
!