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Cooler Woes and discoveries

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a c 225 K Overclocking
February 4, 2007 3:31:23 PM

Theres a lot of cooling solutions out there with seemingly new companies popping up daily getting into the cooling scene so whats the top performing Air Cooling solution available, looking for performance in cooling, ease of mounting, M/B mounting situations, Etc.

What have you personally discovered about some of the available offerings, good, bad, doesn't fit properly Etc.

Heres a start, I have an Artic Cooling Freezer 64 Pro, rated for socket 939 application, the heatsink base is apprx. 1/8" smaller all the way around than the heatspreader of an AMD 64bit CPU, and the locking mechanism, when locked into place doesn't center the base but pulls it to one side leaving 1/4" of the CPU heatspreader uncovered.

So actually it doesn't do any better at cooling than the stock AMD heatpipe cooler does, and is a waste of money for an AMD 939 solution.

So guys heres where we can compare notes, I'm tired of spending money on solutions that don't work because some sponsored website gave the thing a good review when it actually should have received a bad review.

I guess I should have learned from my own experience with Artic Cooling but I also have 2 Accelero X1s, shelved because they took up too much room when mounted in SLI and didn't cool any better than the stock GPU coolers did.

At this point it appears its a bash Artic Cooling thread but its not, I can spread my bashing to Asetek Waterchill of which I've had three bad pumps from them, Asetek needs to just make plactic tubing their good at that, but their W/Ps aren't worth a crap.

So whats your experiences, lets hear it!

No need to defend your Artic Cooling or Asetek product to me, it isn't going to change what I've discovered or been through, but its your typing time!

So what about these monster coolers like the Tuniq Tower, or Zalman, are they worth it?

Do they do the job?

Are they worth spending money on?

Please don't post what your friend down the street told you, lets get some actual hands on experience here, and post your specs that you're using these products on and their cooling temps.

Also any Mounting problems you encountered!

Lets hear it!
February 6, 2007 8:29:40 PM

Here is a thread on another site about it: Linky

-ouch1
Related resources
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February 6, 2007 11:44:56 PM

Quote:
...
Heres a start, I have an Artic Cooling Freezer 64 Pro, rated for socket 939 application, the heatsink base is apprx. 1/8" smaller all the way around than the heatspreader of an AMD 64bit CPU, and the locking mechanism, when locked into place doesn't center the base but pulls it to one side leaving 1/4" of the CPU heatspreader uncovered.

This doesn't have a significant effect, since the heat is coming from the roughly 1cmx1cm center of the heat spreader overlying the actual chip.


Quote:
... the stock AMD heatpipe cooler does,

Interesting. The stock AMD socket 939 coolers I've seen have been the standard heatsink/fan types, without heatpipes. Do you have any links to photos/descriptions of these new heatpipe ones?

Quote:
...So guys heres where we can compare notes, I'm tired of spending money on solutions that don't work because some sponsored website gave the thing a good review when it actually should have received a bad review.

Yeah, that can be a problem; the bad reviews often don't go into as much technical depth as the good ones, and usually don't do direct comparisons with competitors' products.

So what are you looking for in a hsf? Cooling? Quietness? Some combination of both?
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 7, 2007 3:00:03 AM

Quote:
Interesting. The stock AMD socket 939 coolers I've seen have been the standard heatsink/fan types, without heatpipes. Do you have any links to photos/descriptions of these new heatpipe ones?



They're not new, they come with the higher end AMD FX series, I have an FX57 and a FX60 and both came with heatpipe coolers.


Quote:
So what are you looking for in a hsf? Cooling? Quietness? Some combination of both?



First of all I've been the Water Cooling route, and in that area I've had leaks that luckily I caught with my daily inspection before powering up, and additionally 3 failed water cooling pumps, so water cooling is 100% Out Period!

So I'm looking for the absolutely best air cooling solution I can get my hands on, that will cool good enough to OC, but I don't want a jet on the runway when it comes to sound levels either.
February 7, 2007 3:45:45 AM

What you need to look for are coolers with multiple heat pipes, a big-surface-area radiator section to remove heat from the heat pipes, and a big fan (say, 120mm) to keep down the noise but still have good airflow over the radiator section. The Freezer 64 Pro is about as good as it gets for quiet 92 fans, which is why you'll need to go for a bigger fan (or accept more noise).
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 7, 2007 2:05:46 PM

Quote:
What you need to look for are coolers with multiple heat pipes, a big-surface-area radiator section to remove heat from the heat pipes, and a big fan (say, 120mm) to keep down the noise but still have good airflow over the radiator section. The Freezer 64 Pro is about as good as it gets for quiet 92 fans, which is why you'll need to go for a bigger fan (or accept more noise).



Logically that makes sense but I think you're a little bias at least toward the Freezer 64, when in my opinion its a flawed piece of wasted money.


Quote:
This doesn't have a significant effect, since the heat is coming from the roughly 1cmx1cm center of the heat spreader overlying the actual chip.



If the base being smaller doesn' have a significant effect as you say then why does AMDs heatpipe solution out perform the Freezer 64, why didn't AMD themselves manufacture their coolers with smaller bases than the heatspreaders if it was a better solution, with AMDs cooler not having seriously raised heatpipes, but having full coverage of the heatspreader that was designed to remove the heat.

Thats not a question its a statement, but you are at least confirming the base of your AC Freezer is smaller than the heatspreader in your situation, since they're all manufactured the same, Right?

FYI, AMDs Stock Heatpipe Coolers

Partially this thread is to expose heatsinks that are literally a waste of money, IMO if an aftermarket solution doesn't out perform the stock solution, it certainly isn't worth investing money into.

I'm not really concerned with noise levels, I've got 2 120mm blowholes on the top of my case, and 1 120mm side fan blowing straight onto the the video cards, if a heatsink does its job like it should, keeps the CPU cool enough to OC it and still keep it cool, thats what i'm after.

The raised heatpipe designs you mentioned are fantasitc when the M/B is horizontal as is how a lot of their performance tests are done with the heatsink being in a verticle position because heat rises, but that performance is seriously cut when that same cooler is mounted in a tower and ends up being in a horizontal position, literally loosing a good portion of its maximum cooling capabilities.

So really what good is seriously raised heatpipe cooling solution mounted in a horozontal position in the first place, with the heatpipes dead ending, Zalman has probably the best Idea with their pipes circulating
February 7, 2007 9:29:09 PM

Your statements are conditional and a bit extreme. I agree with you that the stock AMD heat-pipe cooler is a very good product, but so is the ACF64. Calling it worthless is just false. Not everybody who buys an ACF64 will be upgrading from the stock AMD heat-pipe cooler. Many people (including me) have upgraded to an ACF64 from the stock non-heatpipe cooler. The ACF64 destroys the stock non-heatpipe cooler. Far better cooling, far quieter and far less expensive than the competition. I got mine for about $25 shipped. You will be hard-pressed to find an aftermarket cooler that performs as well in that price range.

Using the ACF64, my OC Opty 144 at 2.2 idled at 32C and never past 38C under load in a room that would get as hot as 32C in the summer. The stock non-heatpipe cooler that came with the 144 idled at about 34C at stock 1.8 and would load between 45-48C at stock. OC temps were about 5C higher on average over non-OC temps. The ACF64 was also noticeably quieter than the stock cooler.

I have since upgraded to an X2 4400 which came with the heat-pipe cooler. I haven't had the chance to OC it nor will I use the new AMD heat-pipe cooler that came with it as I'm selling it with the Opty 144. Currently it idles at around 23C which is about the ambient Winter room temps. Funny how it works that way. :wink: I can post OC results if interested but I'm not sure when I'm going to get a chance to get to it.

In my case, the ACF64 was well worth it. I'm sorry your experience was not the same. Many factors need to be taken into account before labeling something "worthless". Worthless would be the huge battle wing you see kids putting on their beat up 1998 Honda Accord as the car will most likely never achieve the speed required for the said battle wing to be useful. Even if such speed were achieved, the battle wing will most likely have the negative effect of generating too much downward force at the rear of the vehicle causing the possible unsafe driving situation of a loss of traction at the front of the vehicle. Nor does the battle wing provide any aesthetic qualities.

Note that temps were never a limiting factor in OCg the 144. Hardware was and will probably be the limiting factor in OC the X2 4400 as well. Budgetary factors constrained what I could and could not purchase.

Quote:
The raised heatpipe designs you mentioned are fantasitc when the M/B is horizontal as is how a lot of their performance tests are done with the heatsink being in a verticle position because heat rises, but that performance is seriously cut when that same cooler is mounted in a tower and ends up being in a horizontal position, literally loosing a good portion of its maximum cooling capabilities.

So really what good is seriously raised heatpipe cooling solution mounted in a horozontal position in the first place, with the heatpipes dead ending, Zalman has probably the best Idea with their pipes circulating

Most heatpipes use capillary action to negate the effect of orientation on the motherboard so that point is rather moot.
February 7, 2007 10:02:14 PM

Quote:
...
This doesn't have a significant effect, since the heat is coming from the roughly 1cmx1cm center of the heat spreader overlying the actual chip.


If the base being smaller doesn' have a significant effect as you say then why does AMDs heatpipe solution out perform the Freezer 64
To make sure everyone is on the same base, what do you mean by "out perform"? Do you mean thermal resistance (degC/W)? Do you mean noise? Some combination? Next, a reference to the data showing the AMD OEM heatpipe cooler outperforming the Freezer 64 Pro (or whatever aftermarket cooler) would be helpful. Otherwise, it's hard to have a meaningful discussion. :wink:

Quote:
, why didn't AMD themselves manufacture their coolers with smaller bases than the heatspreaders if it was a better solution, with AMDs cooler not having seriously raised heatpipes, but having full coverage of the heatspreader that was designed to remove the heat.
I didn't say it was *better* to not have full coverage, just that having a fairly narrow gap around the edge wouldn't make a significant difference. BTW, it's my understanding that a big reason for the "heatspreader" is to provide mechanical protection for the CPU silicon chip, lessening the chance of damaging the chip through over-zealous and/or inexperienced hsf mounting efforts.

Quote:
...you are at least confirming the base of your AC Freezer is smaller than the heatspreader in your situation,
Nope, I've got a Freezer 7 Pro for LGA775; same cooler, different mounting hardware. It seems to fully cover Intel CPUs.

Thanks! The AMD heatpipe coolers DO look good; I wouldn't be surprised if they cooled better than many/most aftermarket socket 939 coolers.

Quote:
IMO if an aftermarket solution doesn't out perform the stock solution, it certainly isn't worth investing money into.
I agree, but there are many definitions of outperforming, so it's not so simple.

Quote:
I'm not really concerned with noise levels,
That's fine. Intel (and presumably AMD) have invested a fair amount of effort in the past few years to make their coolers quieter. In Intel's case at least, it has been through changing the fan speed control logic to delay increasing fan rpms until higher temps, thus allowing the CPUs to run at higher temps.

Quote:
...but that performance is seriously cut when that same cooler is mounted in a tower and ends up being in a horizontal position, literally loosing a good portion of its maximum cooling capabilities.
As Anoobis mentions, the heatpipes used in coolers are pretty insensitive to orientation, as their internal structure is a network of capillary passages (I think they are often made of sintered powder). I know my Freezer 7 Pro cools quite well even though its heat pipes are parallel to the ground.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 7, 2007 10:50:52 PM

Well with a non heatpipe AMD cooling solution, I concede the AS64 would obviously be better than that.


I wasn't trying to offend you with the word Worthless the AS64 may be of super importance to you but to me it isn't, because its sitting on a shelf not being used, to me it hasn't been worth the money I spent on it, so I'll change my statement from Worthless, to not worth it to me. OK


Quote:
Most heatpipes use capillary action to negate the effect of orientation on the motherboard so that point is rather moot



Just how moot is moot? relating to cooling temps.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 7, 2007 10:55:34 PM

When I'm saying out performing I'm talking temp.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 7, 2007 11:16:59 PM

What do you think about this coolers design?
February 8, 2007 12:12:19 AM

Quote:
When I'm saying out performing I'm talking temp.
Gotcha.

WRT the VapoChill,
Interesting that it uses R134a without any compressor. I'm not sure how that will work in practice.

It has a few problems:
1) Looks like a small evaporator heat transfer area to the refrigerant inside.
2) Looks like it depends on orientation (unlike other heat pipes): "Since the recirculation of the coolant is based on gravity the pipes must be turned in an upward direction".
3) Its rated 150w heat capacity is pretty run-of-the-mill (similar to your favorite, the AC Freezer Pro :wink: ).

In any case, here is a company with good overviews of heat-pipe technology: http://www.enertron-inc.com/enertron-products/heat-pipe...

Info on working fluids and horizontal vs. vertical heat transfer rates are on this page (Fig. 2, about 3/4ths down the page): http://www.enertron-inc.com/enertron-products/heat-pipe...
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 1:28:06 AM

The heatpipes that rely on capillary action, whats inside the copper tubes that causes that action?

Do you know?
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 1:33:26 AM

Belay my last, found it in the link you posted, interesting stuff. Thanks!
February 8, 2007 2:48:32 AM

I would say at this point, stay away from the Scythe Ninja. While a great heatsink, Scythe seems to have done something wrong with the mounting setups for the rev B. There are a few threads on SilentPCReview's forums about this issue.

For Intel platforms, Scythe's new "push pin" style mount does not seem to apply an adequate amount of pressure, which they do seem to be aware of because if you purchase their "Universal Retention Kit" they include a piece of copper I believe. You put it between the cpu and heatsink, thus adding pressure. Personally I think that's a very ghetto way to address the problem.

For AM2 sockets, there's been a few people that have snapped clips off the retention bracket trying to install the thing.

I don't know what Scythe is doing, but what should've been an uneventful update to the great heatsink has been anything but that.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 2:59:10 AM

Now thats the kinda input I was looking for, things people have discovered about different models to make everyone aware that these problems exist. Thanks for that info. :) 
February 8, 2007 3:46:40 AM

I had great results with the AC Freezer 7 pro on my OCd e6600.

Bad with the scythe katana, similar to problems noted above, very little AS5 spread after multiple hookups to the MB

This review was done last week and covers many 775 solutions.

I finally moved to a watercooled case, the robelo Titan, and it is doing a great job ov cooling my cpu, hits 42C loaded with Orthos at a 3.2 OC.
February 8, 2007 4:01:56 AM

Zalman 7000Cu.

Keeps my stock 3800+ 939 CPU usually within 7-10C of ambient.

It's pretty quiet. Not as quiet as a stock AMD XP cooler I have (it's nearly death silent), but not as loud as most other aftermarket HSF I've had experience with.

Be sure to check any mounting brackets around the CPU socket. Make sure they don't interfere with the full seating of the cooler. I had to file CPU brackets on two AMD boards down enough so that it would make contact with the CPU heat spreader.

Make sure to check the MB compatibility charts on Zalman's site.
February 8, 2007 4:36:42 AM

Hey guys, i thought id throw in my 10cents worth, ive allways used zalman coolers, and allways been impressed by their performance (temp wise) and there ability to run quietly. however i have installed a zalman VF700 on my 7900GT (overclocked of course) and it hasnt dropped my idle temps by any significant amount (still idles at about 45) though at load it is about 5 degrees less at about 65.
I think that the main issue is that in my case there is a dead space where the graphics card and chipset are, where no air really moves, but i am still dissapointed by the temps that the zalman cooler hits.

However i can say that i LOVE the 9500Cu i have on my CPU ;p
February 8, 2007 4:56:00 AM

Zalman Beetle: 4/5
The good: Adjustable fan with fr and rear control options. Quiet IS quiet. Cools well, covers heat spreader +. Funky look with leds
The bad: Difficult to mount, didnt seat well at all. Loud IS loud. Can vibrate a lot at full speed.

Zalman VGA ramsink: 5/5
The good: super easy to mount. Cools perfik! Saved $$$$$ by not using water for vga ram.
The bad: None so far

Dangerden D5 Pump 4/5
The good: Adjustable speed, quiet, good flow+head pressure.
The bad: Not specific to this product but it can be a pain to house it.

DD TDX cpu water block 4/5
The good: Cools well! OC cpu never goes above 40c, easy enough to install, ok price. Clear head looks cool.
The bad: Can be tricky to install with pipes connected. Clear head must be checked as they MAY crack over time.

DD Maze4 gpu 4/5
The good: Cools well. 1950XT oc never above 50c (gpu loop after cpu)
The bad: Impossible to install with card in. Difficult with card out.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 3:20:16 PM

Quote:
I had great results with the AC Freezer 7 pro on my OCd e6600.

Bad with the scythe katana, similar to problems noted above, very little AS5 spread after multiple hookups to the MB

This review was done last week and covers many 775 solutions.

I finally moved to a watercooled case, the robelo Titan, and it is doing a great job ov cooling my cpu, hits 42C loaded with Orthos at a 3.2 OC.



I've had my eye on the Scythe Infinity for a 939 cooling solution, but I'm concerned as to whether its going to fit on my M/B I have a DFI lanparty SLI and with its socket location and the RAM I'm using the Corsair PC3500 Pro, the Pro RAM sits higher in the RAM sockets thus limiting my cooling solutions.

I kinda wonder if Corsair and now some others going to this DDR2 ram with the cooling fins out the top like a bad hair day, don't realize its invading clearance area for some of the heatpipe heatsinks.

Has anyone run into clearance issues because of this new RAM cooling?
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 3:22:42 PM

Quote:
Make sure to check the MB compatibility charts on Zalman's site.



Good suggestion! :wink:
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 3:25:05 PM

Do you possibly have the room for a side fan addition?

When I went SLI I installed a side fan blowing straight onto the video cards, made all the difference!
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 3:27:06 PM

Good Input, Including the good and bad points! Thanks :wink:
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 3:42:17 PM

Quote:
Calling it worthless is just false.



I went back over what I'd written until you posted what you had to say, where did I actually say the AC64 was worthless, how about quote what you're talking about, and I haven't edited anything out, each post denotes if its been edited.

I said not worth it to me, didn't I, or not worth me spending money on, so where did you get what you commented on?
February 8, 2007 4:54:40 PM

Indeed Ry, for some reason I thought I had read that somewhere in your post but I cannot find that so I retract that statement and apologize for the error. I over-reacted when you indicated that it was a flawed piece of wasted money as I believe it is not, nor do I want others getting that impression from this thread. My initial comments on the situation being circumstantial remain. For around $30.00 it will be hard to beat the ACF64 and would be a great upgrade for many. You didn't offend me with your post nor was my intention to offend you with mine.

Something that really pisses me off are the way manufacturers have been jacking their prices up steeply. The Thermaltake Big Typhoon is another excellent heatsink and roughly 2 months ago you could pick it up at the Egg or Heatsinkfactory for about $30 as well. Now both retailers are selling it for about $45. This happened with the Ninja when the Rev B initially came out. It's price was jacked way up to that of the Zalman pricing, for the same cooler just with an AM2 capability. Luckily it has gone down and can also be had with instant rebates at the right time.

It looks like Mondoman did a good job on covering everything else regarding heat pipes. Just one note on the Vapochill, I've no experience with it but I do remember wusy being rather disappointed with it because it wasn't as stellar a performer as their past products.

In regards to function9's comments on the Ninja. I agree. I never liked the S775 push-pin setup period. It works great for the stock cooler, if installed correctly which was an issue in the past. It can be a small bit of a pain in the arse to make sure the pins are in all the way. Scythe should have made up for this issue by designing the Ninja to be used with a backplate. IMO, all of the larger towers should utilize a backplate for S775 installation as I don't feel the push-pin (or twist-pin) is a sufficient method for holding them in place. Especially if the system is ever moved. A cooler like the Ninja weighs just over 1.5 lbs with fan. I'm not concerned at all about that kind of stress it places on the motherboard as it would take quite a bit of force to break one. That's just a lot of weight to place trust in 4 plastic pins.




EDIT: One final note on the ACF64 and it's S775 cousin. The base of this heatsink is rather disappointing and a little lapping can do wonders for it. I suspect that this is why the heatsink performs poorly with other TIMs like AS5 instead of AC's MX-1. Without lapping, you would probably be better off with AS Ceramique, AC MX-1, or Masscool G751 (not X23-7762).
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 5:57:07 PM

Quote:
EDIT: One final note on the ACF64 and it's S775 cousin. The base of this heatsink is rather disappointing and a little lapping can do wonders for it. I suspect that this is why the heatsink performs poorly with other TIMs like AS5 instead of AC's MX-1. Without lapping, you would probably be better off with AS Ceramique, AC MX-1, or Masscool G751 (not X23-7762).


I agree I lapped mine to a mirror finish.


Quote:
Scythe should have made up for this issue by designing the Ninja to be used with a backplate. IMO, all of the larger towers should utilize a backplate for S775 installation as I don't feel the push-pin (or twist-pin) is a sufficient method for holding them in place. Especially if the system is ever moved. A cooler like the Ninja weighs just over 1.5 lbs with fan. I'm not concerned at all about that kind of stress it places on the motherboard as it would take quite a bit of force to break one. That's just a lot of weight to place trust in 4 plastic pins.



I also have concerns for some of these monster heatsinks putting stress on the M/Bs if not sufficiently backplated.


Quote:
Something that really pisses me off are the way manufacturers have been jacking their prices up steeply.



C2Ds heat is giving them the perfect opportunities to increase their prices across the board, Now I'm not blaming Intel for that, they have no control on what prices after market CPU coolers are priced at, but the cooler manufacturers know they're going to sell to the OCing community and get what they're asking.

As long as we're paying, they'll keep taking as much as they can justifiably get, they've got to make a profit off the sale, but how much profit in comparison to the manufacturing cost, if the demand isn't there price drops, but the demand drives up the cost.

Well I'm stopping now before I say something to start an arguement, as always you handle yourself as a gentleman! Ry
February 8, 2007 6:58:23 PM

There was no argument to begin with Ry. Just a discussion. :) 

I'm glad Mondoman piped in because he's a sharp cat on the "science" behind this but I hope Clue69Less (hint, hint) will jump in with some thoughts too. From the sounds of it, he has or can do quite a bit of testing with a homebuilt (no offense intended) test station. He could possibly have some good info for this thread. Last I heard he was favoring the Thermalright Ultra 120 right now. With good cause because everything I've read on it notes that it can be an incredible heatsink with the right fan.

Just one thing on those AMD heatpipe coolers. It looks as though AMD changed the design (or went with a different manufacturer) because this newer Madshrimps article has a different design than the GamePC article 4ryan6 too. You'll notice that the base on the cooler from the newer Madshrimps' article is a bit smaller, though I suspect it still covers the entire CPU heatspreader like 4ryan6 noted in his earlier post. And again, it performs incredibly against a Thermalright XP-90 proving 4ryan6's point about "upgrading" from one of them. Thoughts anyone???
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 7:42:15 PM

Quote:
Just one thing on those AMD heatpipe coolers. It looks as though AMD changed the design (or went with a different manufacturer) because this newer Madshrimps article has a different design than the GamePC article 4ryan6 too. You'll notice that the base on the cooler from the newer Madshrimps' article is a bit smaller, though I suspect it still covers the entire CPU heatspreader like 4ryan6 noted in his earlier post. And again, it performs incredibly against a Thermalright XP-90 proving 4ryan6's point about "upgrading" from one of them. Thoughts anyone???


Actually I have both of those AMD cooler models, One came with the FX57 and the other model with the FX60, my temps OC'd to 3.0G are 30c idle and 36c under load.
February 8, 2007 8:38:11 PM

8O Holy smokes that things a monster but it doesn't look like it's very tall so case width shouldn't be a factor, but case compatibility could still be an issue due to it's length. Should be interesting especially with dual 120mm fans.

They should have dubbed it the Saturn V.
February 8, 2007 10:02:46 PM

It all depends on how it is mounted. If it uses a mounting plate then there should be no worries regardless of the platform. If it mounts to the socket itself like in AMD configs, I would be a little concerned about the stress on the socket mounting tabs. Especially on S939 and below. I would be very concerned about a S775 if there is no mounting plate. Motherboards themselves would stand up just fine, but I question the ability of the 4 pin mounting system itself to sufficiently hold a cooler this size in place just like I question it on the Ninja. After looking at the first page of the article, it looks as though it uses some kind of front & back mounting setup so it should be fine.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 11:32:22 PM

Wow! That is one huge mamajama, its got my attention!!!
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 11:33:59 PM

Yeah that things got to have a backplate for 939 mounting.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 8, 2007 11:54:54 PM

According to Coolermaster it will be on the market in March, and the fan bracket is movable, if you need to reposition it.
February 9, 2007 7:58:08 AM

I am most definatly looking forward to seeing some benchmarks for this cooler.
Its definatly taken "bigger is better" philosophy to heart!
BUT its not really the direction i want air coolers to be going in, i mean size wise its just getting ridiculous, if we are willing to go this big, why havent we all switched to the btx standard?
February 9, 2007 8:39:38 AM

Thoughts on Acellero X1:

Bought this and tried to fit it onto my XFX 7800GT but it bloody well wouldn't ! Should say on their website that it doesn't support this card ;(
February 9, 2007 3:47:38 PM

It says it does. What problem did you run into?
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 9, 2007 11:26:13 PM

Did a little Moot test today of my own, used an AMD 64 3200+ runs at 2ghz, left everything stock to do the test.

Used the AC64 did a test with the computer on its side, AC64 in vertical position vs case standing upright AC64 in horizontal.

I have to admit I was surprised!

1c difference with the AC64 in its vertical it was 1c cooler than the horizontal position, so you are right it is moot. Ry
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 9, 2007 11:31:07 PM

Quote:
Thoughts on Acellero X1:

Bought this and tried to fit it onto my XFX 7800GT but it bloody well wouldn't ! Should say on their website that it doesn't support this card ;(



Thats unusual it did fit my MSI 7800 GTX, just didn't do that great of a job, I'm curious what woundn't fit?
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 9, 2007 11:32:58 PM

Quote:
I am most definatly looking forward to seeing some benchmarks for this cooler.
Its definatly taken "bigger is better" philosophy to heart!
BUT its not really the direction i want air coolers to be going in, i mean size wise its just getting ridiculous, if we are willing to go this big, why havent we all switched to the btx standard?



Yeah next thing you know the entire case will be the cooler, Wow now thats an idea! :wink:
February 10, 2007 12:16:52 AM

Quote:
..
1c difference with the AC64 in its vertical it was 1c cooler than the horizontal position, so you are right it is moot. ...

Heat pipes rule! :trophy:
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 11, 2007 1:29:38 PM

Quote:
..
1c difference with the AC64 in its vertical it was 1c cooler than the horizontal position, so you are right it is moot. ...

Heat pipes rule! :trophy:


Yes now lets discover which one is king for each socket setup?
February 13, 2007 7:57:34 PM

Yeah but some people would freak over that 1C. Personally, I wouldn't but I only drink decaf after 5:00 PM.
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 13, 2007 9:24:37 PM

1c is really nothing, I was really surprised the difference wasn't more, but theres way more technology even in todays heatsinks than I think a lot of us realize there is.
February 13, 2007 10:28:05 PM

Quote:
Yeah next thing you know the entire case will be the cooler, Wow now thats an idea! :wink:


It is an idea. Also, it is a reality. It's bloody expensive for now, but Zalman has a case where you fix heat pipes between all big heat sources and blocks on the case. I'd be up for this one if it weren't 6x the cost of other nice HTPC rigs.

Zalman's TNN300.
February 13, 2007 11:22:22 PM

I just had a bad experience with a thermaltake mini typhoon which I consider utter garbage, replaced with a zalman 9700 and I couldnt be happier!

mini typhoon 1/10 (it looks good)+ has queer mounts
zalman 9700 (9/10) (expensive), proper mounts!
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 14, 2007 1:44:29 AM

Quote:
Yeah next thing you know the entire case will be the cooler, Wow now thats an idea! :wink:


It is an idea. Also, it is a reality. It's bloody expensive for now, but Zalman has a case where you fix heat pipes between all big heat sources and blocks on the case. I'd be up for this one if it weren't 6x the cost of other nice HTPC rigs.

Zalman's TNN300.

Holy Crap ! I was just joking I didn't realize one had already been made.

Expensive Bugger! :) 
a c 225 K Overclocking
February 14, 2007 1:46:03 AM

Quote:
I just had a bad experience with a thermaltake mini typhoon which I consider utter garbage, replaced with a zalman 9700 and I couldnt be happier!

mini typhoon 1/10 (it looks good)+ has queer mounts
zalman 9700 (9/10) (expensive), proper mounts!



Thanks for that input.
!