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Ethernet problem, can't receive packets

Last response: in Networking
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October 6, 2006 8:49:01 PM

I have an Intel D875PBZ motherboard with a built in Intel® Pro/1000 CT Desktop Connection (ethernet). My computer and a work computer are hooked up through a Linksys LBEFSR41 v 2.1 router but I have in the past been able to connect directly from my Surboard SB5120 cable modem to my computer through the ethernet connection. I had a power outtage and now I can no longer connect to the interent using in Intel® Pro/1000 CT either with a direct modem computer connection or throught the router. Newtwork devices says I have a connection with the Intel® Pro/1000 CT Desktop Connection and I am sending packets but can't receive them. I have turned off zone alarm firewall, no luck. I deleted zone alarm and tried again no luck. I tried MS firewall on and off, no luck. I have tried both a direct connection with the cable modem and through the router but I have the same issue. However, I can connect to the internet with a direct connetion from the cable modem to my computer through the USB connection. I know the modem and router are working since the work computer is connecting through the router and modem as it did prior to the power outtage.

As an addendum,his issue has happened several times before. Once I took my computer to a friends house and they connected right up and all was good. The second time, I reset the router and that worked but this time around, no success.

Any help is a appreciated. Although my motherboard is still under warranty, Intel does not offer any type of support for this product.
October 7, 2006 4:30:23 AM

pls tell us if you are using a fix ip address or Dhcp automatic assigned ip address??
October 7, 2006 5:03:41 AM

If you can get ahold of a cable tester (Cat 5 or 6 ethernet) test your cable. You Always want to start troubleshooting at the physical layer.

If the cable is good then I would try pinging your loopback address on your computer's NIC. I believe it is anything beginning with 127.X.X.X (i.e. 127.0.0.1).

If your NIC is good then you may want to go into your "Hardware devices" and ensure that your NIC is setup for full-duplexing (packet traffic both ways @ the same time).

If "full-duplexing" is enabled you may check your TCP/IP stack. (I can dig up some links for Protocol stack repair).

Since you already tried removing your firewalls I doubt these symptoms have anything to do with the Application Layer. I you don't mind a little reading you could go and get a program called WINDUMP with WINPCAP (both for windows), learn how to use it and watch traffic. WINDUMP allows you to see if packets are really leaving and entering your NIC. I usually dump to a file and and then replay in a resized CMD window.

The only other culprit I can think of is maybe some ports on your router are damaged. Maybe a circuit on your router is damaged or perhaps the firmware or hardware on your router allows change in duplexing or speed autonegotiation.

Anyways, I will be watching my email for a couple days to see if you've posted back. GL
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October 7, 2006 2:26:23 PM

Thanks for the feedback folks.
Comcast has us running automatic DHCP. I'm fairly computer literate Garius but could you possibly put the bolded comments in laymans terms or provide some links to accomplish them.

I did try a separate cat 5 and that didn't work. I did try a differnet port on the router too, but no luck.

If the cable is good then I would try pinging your loopback address on your computer's NIC. I believe it is anything beginning with 127.X.X.X (i.e. 127.0.0.1).

If your NIC is good then you may want to go into your "Hardware devices" and ensure that your NIC is setup for full-duplexing (packet traffic both ways @ the same time).

If "full-duplexing" is enabled you may check your TCP/IP stack. (I can dig up some links for Protocol stack repair).


I found another forum link with some issues it seems I experienced the last time around and the reset router worked that time. http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/Limited-Connect...

Thanks again for the feedback.
October 12, 2006 1:26:55 AM

If the cable is good then I would try pinging your loopback address on your computer's NIC. I believe it is anything beginning with 127.X.X.X (i.e. 127.0.0.1).

- Go to start -> run. Type "cmd" (without the quotations) and ping 127.0.0.1

If your NIC is good then you may want to go into your "Hardware devices" and ensure that your NIC is setup for full-duplexing (packet traffic both ways @ the same time).

- Go to control panel -> system -> Hardware tab -> click the device manager button. Click the plus button next to "network adaptors" to expand and right click on it. Select properties and go to the advanced tab.
Make sure your Link speed/Duplex mode is set to "Auto Mode".

If "full-duplexing" is enabled you may check your TCP/IP stack. (I can dig up some links for Protocol stack repair).

Here is the link I was referring to if you had a corrupt winsock2 (messed up TCP/IP). http://support.microsoft.com/kb/811259
October 14, 2006 12:54:56 PM

Thank you again for the information.
!