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tips for buying my first HDTV?

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Anonymous
July 3, 2004 5:45:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi, I'm in Houston, Texas, I plan to buy a tv for myself in the next
month, and I am looking for information.

First, what's the best website to find the most up-to-date reviews of
TV's?

Second, I would prefer to get financing on buying a TV (although if
worse comes to worse, I could wait a few more months). Does that limit
me to basically Best Buy? Does that mean I should buy only locally
and not from the INternet? How are the Walmart models?

Conceivably I could wait up to 6 months if the price drops are
expected to be substantial.

I haven't settled on an exact price range, but it's probably between
750-1500.
If anyone wants to recommend specific features/models for that price
range, here are my preferences:

live alone in an apartment; size or bulkiness is not that big of a
deal; more interested in fidelity (However, people in apartments move
often, so it would be good if it doesn't weigh a ton). don't have a
sound system, but eventually will be getting a wireless media hub to
shift mpeg files from PC to the TV/DVD. I'm also planning to buy a
prosumer camcorder in the $1000-2000 range for some video projects.
I'm guessing that I'm in the range for conventional CRT 36 inch, 4/3.

I read an article recently about tv's that project images to a blank
wall, an intriguing idea indeed (with the advantage of more space and
possibly better portability). Opinions\?

Robert Nagle

More about : tips buying hdtv

Anonymous
July 4, 2004 1:32:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Robert Nagle wrote:
> Hi, I'm in Houston, Texas, I plan to buy a tv for myself in the next
> month, and I am looking for information.
>
> First, what's the best website to find the most up-to-date reviews of
> TV's?

Look through http://www.avsforum.com/

There are multiple discussions on the various technologies and specific
brands.

>
> Second, I would prefer to get financing on buying a TV (although if
> worse comes to worse, I could wait a few more months). Does that limit
> me to basically Best Buy? Does that mean I should buy only locally
> and not from the INternet? How are the Walmart models?

Most financing are through the manufacturer. Mitsubishi does theirs through
almost any dealer, as do most others.
There was a 0% available on my Mits when I got it from a smaller independent
dealer (though I didn't use it).

>
> Conceivably I could wait up to 6 months if the price drops are
> expected to be substantial.

Prices will always drop. It's just what are you willing to pay? I see
below you have a budget in mind. For your screen, you should be able to get
up to a 40"-50"+ HD ready set RPTV, or a 32"-24" direct view (tube set).

>
> I haven't settled on an exact price range, but it's probably between
> 750-1500.
> If anyone wants to recommend specific features/models for that price
> range, here are my preferences:
>
> live alone in an apartment; size or bulkiness is not that big of a
> deal; more interested in fidelity (However, people in apartments move
> often, so it would be good if it doesn't weigh a ton). don't have a
> sound system, but eventually will be getting a wireless media hub to
> shift mpeg files from PC to the TV/DVD. I'm also planning to buy a
> prosumer camcorder in the $1000-2000 range for some video projects.
> I'm guessing that I'm in the range for conventional CRT 36 inch, 4/3.
>

Most HD sets will be 16x9. I believe Sony may make a tube that is 4x3 (I
thought I saw it Circuit City the other week, 40" 4:3 if I am not mistaken),
but it may be a little outside of your price range.

RPTV may not be a great option if you move a lot as when moving them, though
not very heavy, may need additional calibrations.

> I read an article recently about tv's that project images to a blank
> wall, an intriguing idea indeed (with the advantage of more space and
> possibly better portability). Opinions\?
>

Can't help you on that one. I have an RPTV, and I really haven't seen them,
though from what I understand, the room needs to be much darker for them.

> Robert Nagle
Anonymous
July 4, 2004 1:23:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

About HDTV's weighing a ton, just about all of them do. I have a 30" HDTV and you need two people to move the thing, unless it's just across the room and you're strong. :) 

"Robert Nagle" <idiotprogrammer@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:fbef97c.0407031245.5ca7bc07@posting.google.com...
> Hi, I'm in Houston, Texas, I plan to buy a tv for myself in the next
> month, and I am looking for information.
>
> First, what's the best website to find the most up-to-date reviews of
> TV's?
>
> Second, I would prefer to get financing on buying a TV (although if
> worse comes to worse, I could wait a few more months). Does that limit
> me to basically Best Buy? Does that mean I should buy only locally
> and not from the INternet? How are the Walmart models?
>
> Conceivably I could wait up to 6 months if the price drops are
> expected to be substantial.
>
> I haven't settled on an exact price range, but it's probably between
> 750-1500.
> If anyone wants to recommend specific features/models for that price
> range, here are my preferences:
>
> live alone in an apartment; size or bulkiness is not that big of a
> deal; more interested in fidelity (However, people in apartments move
> often, so it would be good if it doesn't weigh a ton). don't have a
> sound system, but eventually will be getting a wireless media hub to
> shift mpeg files from PC to the TV/DVD. I'm also planning to buy a
> prosumer camcorder in the $1000-2000 range for some video projects.
> I'm guessing that I'm in the range for conventional CRT 36 inch, 4/3.
>
> I read an article recently about tv's that project images to a blank
> wall, an intriguing idea indeed (with the advantage of more space and
> possibly better portability). Opinions\?
>
> Robert Nagle
Related resources
July 4, 2004 6:09:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Robert Nagle wrote:

> Hi, I'm in Houston, Texas, I plan to buy a tv for myself in the next
> month, and I am looking for information.
>
> First, what's the best website to find the most up-to-date reviews of
> TV's?
>
> Second, I would prefer to get financing on buying a TV (although if
> worse comes to worse, I could wait a few more months). Does that limit
> me to basically Best Buy? Does that mean I should buy only locally
> and not from the INternet? How are the Walmart models?
>
> Conceivably I could wait up to 6 months if the price drops are
> expected to be substantial.
>
> I haven't settled on an exact price range, but it's probably between
> 750-1500.
> If anyone wants to recommend specific features/models for that price
> range, here are my preferences:
>
> live alone in an apartment; size or bulkiness is not that big of a
> deal; more interested in fidelity (However, people in apartments move
> often, so it would be good if it doesn't weigh a ton). don't have a
> sound system, but eventually will be getting a wireless media hub to
> shift mpeg files from PC to the TV/DVD. I'm also planning to buy a
> prosumer camcorder in the $1000-2000 range for some video projects.
> I'm guessing that I'm in the range for conventional CRT 36 inch, 4/3.
>
> I read an article recently about tv's that project images to a blank
> wall, an intriguing idea indeed (with the advantage of more space and
> possibly better portability). Opinions\?
>
> Robert Nagle
Based on what I'm seeing you have a budget which is good but why are you
financing? The state of HDTV isn't worth going into debt for right now.
I would recommend you wait a little longer and save your money to buy cash.
I'm not preaching, just saying that HDTV is really limited right now,
and IMO should be considered a toy," because you want to" not something
to pay for with debt.

Also it will give you time to research what programming is really out
there, which is not much.

Off the soap box, I still think good CRT RPTV is the best picture
available. Personal feelings are: stay away from GE, RCA, and Sony and
go with about a 46" CRT RPTV.


Clay
Anonymous
July 5, 2004 2:42:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Robert Nagle" <idiotprogrammer@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:fbef97c.0407031245.5ca7bc07@posting.google.com...
>
> Conceivably I could wait up to 6 months if the price drops are
> expected to be substantial.
>
> I haven't settled on an exact price range, but it's probably between
> 750-1500.
> If anyone wants to recommend specific features/models for that price
> range, here are my preferences:
>
> live alone in an apartment; size or bulkiness is not that big of a
> deal; more interested in fidelity (However, people in apartments move
> often, so it would be good if it doesn't weigh a ton). . .
> I'm guessing that I'm in the range for conventional CRT 36 inch, 4/3.

At this point, I tend to recommend standard analog (non-HD) CRTs if you're
looking for anything less than about 26", and 4:3 HD sets (CRT direct view)
for 27" to perhaps 32" (it just adds a couple hundred $ to the price of an
analog set of the same size). Anything much above that and the price is
getting such that most likely this will be a bit of an investment, in which
case it's more worthwhile looking for a 16:9 HD set.

The best balance of affordability with picture quality in sizes under 40" is
still usually direct-view CRT. But they are heavy and bulky -- think 150lbs
or so for the 30-34" sets. For larger sizes, the best price/performance
ratio is rear-projection CRT. These tend to require more setup and
calibration than most other technologies, are large and bulky, and can be
suceptible to burn in, but are otherwise a good choice.

Most every other technology is, at present, going to cost more than your
price range.

DLP may come down in price over the next year, but I'm not sure when or how
much. Perhaps by the holiday season these will be in a more interesting
price range and be a better choice. The newer models are claiming some
improvements in contrast and black levels as well, though the largest
improvements will be in more expensive models rather than the cheaper one.
This is the only technology that I'd necessarily recommend waiting for price
drops and quality improvements in the near term. This technology seems to be
displacing rear projection LCD and LCDOS in many manufacturers' lineups (at
least for the time being), and with new chips (some lower cost and slightly
better quality than previous generations, others substantially better
quality) and more competitors making sets, prices on DLPs could really come
down noticeably, while narrowing the quality gap in DLPs weaker areas. DLP
sets are also quite light and compact (some newer models may be as little as
7" deep, and they can be set on an appropriate sized table top or stand).

Direct-view LCD and plasma are way too expensive for what you get, in my
opinion, unless you absolutely need the flatness.

I'm not sure that I'd recommend front-projection setups for most users. They
can be great in some circumstances, if you know what you're doing as far as
setup, limitations, etc., or if you spend enough (they're not necessarily
cheaper than other types of TV), but probably not the best choice for the
average viewer.

Other than waiting for the DLPs to drop in price, you might want to consider
a slightly smaller 4:3 HD CRT (maybe 30") to last for the next few years,
but not spend so much that you'd feel bad about replacing it before too
long.
!