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Tube or LCD

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July 12, 2004 2:30:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have only one place for a TV in my home. It has a cabinet built into a
large stone fireplace area, the opening is 34 inches wide. So that's it, I
need to stick with a smaller set. Sony, Toshiba have sets which will just
fit in the opening. I can get a tube set for about 1200 or an LCD for 3000.
I can afford either.

My question is this is there an advantage to one or the other? The both
look great in the store.

The glass tube sets are 1080i is this an advantage?

Which unit is most likely to last the longest?

Plasma is out since my home is at 8000 feet. The only problem with the tube
sets that I can see is that they weigh well over 100 pounds.

More about : tube lcd

Anonymous
July 12, 2004 7:49:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

sundog wrote:
> The glass tube sets are 1080i is this an advantage?

If you watch enough of that programming, it would be. I don't so it's a wash for me. :|

> Which unit is most likely to last the longest?

Both should last 'long enough' if it is made good.

> Plasma is out since my home is at 8000 feet. The only problem with the tube
> sets that I can see is that they weigh well over 100 pounds.

See, I don't want to go with tubes anymore, I've given up on moving that big ass piece. :) 
I am going, personally, with an LCD as I can use it as another computer screen whenever I
get my next larger lcd. That's my only reason.
I could go with the plasma, as I had originally planned, but with the 'burn in effect of
plasma, however remote it is, I just don't see the need. And since I have the extra $$
(about 3.5K as well) to burn on it, I figuered, why not.
--
"... respect, all good works are not done by only good folk ..."
-till next time, Jameson Stalanthas Yu -x- <<poetry.dolphins-cove.com>>
consul@INVALIDdolphins-cove.com ((remove the INVALID to email))
July 12, 2004 10:57:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:30:51 -0600, sundog wrote:

> I have only one place for a TV in my home. It has a cabinet built into a
> large stone fireplace area, the opening is 34 inches wide. So that's it, I
> need to stick with a smaller set. Sony, Toshiba have sets which will just
> fit in the opening. I can get a tube set for about 1200 or an LCD for 3000.
> I can afford either.
>
> My question is this is there an advantage to one or the other? The both
> look great in the store.

I'd go with the tube for sure. Why pay (a lot) more when the tube works
plenty well? They'll both last plenty long, so don't worry about that.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 12:23:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

You might also consider the heat that the set will generate.

RichieP

"dizzy" <dizzy@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:HaBIc.59229$JR4.52519@attbi_s54...
> On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:30:51 -0600, sundog wrote:
>
> > I have only one place for a TV in my home. It has a cabinet built into
a
> > large stone fireplace area, the opening is 34 inches wide. So that's it,
I
> > need to stick with a smaller set. Sony, Toshiba have sets which will
just
> > fit in the opening. I can get a tube set for about 1200 or an LCD for
3000.
> > I can afford either.
> >
> > My question is this is there an advantage to one or the other? The both
> > look great in the store.
>
> I'd go with the tube for sure. Why pay (a lot) more when the tube works
> plenty well? They'll both last plenty long, so don't worry about that.
>
July 13, 2004 12:23:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I looked at the Toshiba web site for information regarding power usage for
their 30 inch HDTV direct view set but, they don't list the power
consumption. How many watts are we talking about?

"RichieP" <rpadinDELETETHIS@satx.rr.com> wrote in message
news:brCIc.22223$857.18049@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> You might also consider the heat that the set will generate.
>
> RichieP
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 2:53:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Actually, power consumption may not have a profound effect on dissipated
heat.

What I meant to convey is - if the set is going to be in a (semi) enclosed
area, you may need to worry about the heat buildup around it, as it may have
an adverse affect on the longevity of your set.

RichieP

"sundog" <sundog@mountaindogs.net> wrote in message
news:ccusnt$9jc$1@news.xmission.com...
> I looked at the Toshiba web site for information regarding power usage
for
> their 30 inch HDTV direct view set but, they don't list the power
> consumption. How many watts are we talking about?
>
> "RichieP" <rpadinDELETETHIS@satx.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:brCIc.22223$857.18049@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> > You might also consider the heat that the set will generate.
> >
> > RichieP
>
>
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 4:03:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

IMHO the direct view CRT still has the best overall picture quality-
resolution, contrast ratio, deep blacks and white whites. The only drawbacks
are weight, depth and power consumption (heat buildup in enclosed spaces).
The Sonys all seem to have the best picute tube and the best electonics for
scaling and deinterlacing.

My Sony 34HS510 has a better deinterlacer than the one built into my
progressive scan DVD player. And the scaler automatically takes care of all
types of inputs and results in a very good PQ.

David
"sundog" <sundog@mountaindogs.net> wrote in message
news:ccuebs$tft$1@news.xmission.com...
> I have only one place for a TV in my home. It has a cabinet built into a
> large stone fireplace area, the opening is 34 inches wide. So that's it, I
> need to stick with a smaller set. Sony, Toshiba have sets which will just
> fit in the opening. I can get a tube set for about 1200 or an LCD for
3000.
> I can afford either.
>
> My question is this is there an advantage to one or the other? The both
> look great in the store.
>
> The glass tube sets are 1080i is this an advantage?
>
> Which unit is most likely to last the longest?
>
> Plasma is out since my home is at 8000 feet. The only problem with the
tube
> sets that I can see is that they weigh well over 100 pounds.
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 3:59:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"David&Joan" <djmarchand@cox.net> wrote in message
news:l1KIc.23636$r3.8005@okepread03...
> IMHO the direct view CRT still has the best overall picture quality-
> resolution, contrast ratio, deep blacks and white whites. The only
drawbacks
> are weight, depth and power consumption (heat buildup in enclosed spaces).
> The Sonys all seem to have the best picute tube and the best electonics
for
> scaling and deinterlacing.
>
> My Sony 34HS510 has a better deinterlacer than the one built into my
> progressive scan DVD player. And the scaler automatically takes care of
all
> types of inputs and results in a very good PQ.
>
> David
> "sundog" <sundog@mountaindogs.net> wrote in message
> news:ccuebs$tft$1@news.xmission.com...
> > I have only one place for a TV in my home. It has a cabinet built into
a
> > large stone fireplace area, the opening is 34 inches wide. So that's it,
I
> > need to stick with a smaller set. Sony, Toshiba have sets which will
just
> > fit in the opening. I can get a tube set for about 1200 or an LCD for
> 3000.
> > I can afford either.
> >
> > My question is this is there an advantage to one or the other? The both
> > look great in the store.
> >

Types of sets:

Plasma>> most expensive suffers from phosphor burns and low resolution.
Only buy this if you have a space problem Can't replace screen, limited
life

LCD Projection >>very sharp picture no convergence errors long lasting TV.
make sure you know what you are buying ! As with digital cameras the number
of pixels is important. Today 900K is about upper end. That means it can't
display the 3000k HD standard. Need to replace lamp every 6K hours. NO
PHOSPHOR BURN

DLP Digital light processing >> very sharp picture suffers from the same
990K pixel limit and has a 9000 RPM color wheel For sets over 60" this is
the way to go. Can have multiple lamps for larger sizes, you can't do that
with LCD. Need to replace lamp every 6 K hours NO PHOSPHOR BURN

Projection TV >>good picture suffers from focus and convergence errors. Can
have slightly better picture in HD than LCD or DLP but in low res the DLP
and LCD look better. Expensive to replace picture tubes. COMPARE and read a
buyers guide. Some projection TV's are terrible others are very good. LOOK
for good convergence and good focus at varying light levels.

Glass tube >> less problems generally with convergence errors and focus.
Better light levels at odd angles. Fewer problems with phosphor burns.
Heavy TV's in larger sizes because of design of tube. MAKE SURE you have a
service center with young guys.

In all cases make sure there is local service, preferably with an authorized
service center. Do your homework!
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 4:21:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Many projection TVs have a tappered chassis, i.e. the rear end is
much smaller than the screen in front. If you don't really need to
have the TV sit "inside" this hole, you can consider the option of
only pushing the TV's butt into the hole. Then you may be able to buy
a much bigger TV yet still utilizing the hole.


"sundog" <sundog@mountaindogs.net> wrote in message news:<ccuebs$tft$1@news.xmission.com>...
> I have only one place for a TV in my home. It has a cabinet built into a
> large stone fireplace area, the opening is 34 inches wide. So that's it, I
> need to stick with a smaller set. Sony, Toshiba have sets which will just
> fit in the opening. I can get a tube set for about 1200 or an LCD for 3000.
> I can afford either.
>
> My question is this is there an advantage to one or the other? The both
> look great in the store.
>
> The glass tube sets are 1080i is this an advantage?
>
> Which unit is most likely to last the longest?
>
> Plasma is out since my home is at 8000 feet. The only problem with the tube
> sets that I can see is that they weigh well over 100 pounds.
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 4:28:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I beleive he was talking about LCD projection TV, not LCD panel TV.


hdtvfan <hdtvfan@aol.com> wrote in message news:<lu47f0lqh559upd1319rvq78i2v7gjnc87@4ax.com>...
> You mention LCD sets having a bulb. Are you sure you not talking DLP,
> digital light display promoted by Samsung and a few brands. LCD,
> liquid crystal display is on panels. I have a 5" color lcd tv that
> runs on batteries with no heat.
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 4:46:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

hdtvfan (hdtvfan@aol.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> You mention LCD sets having a bulb. Are you sure you not talking DLP,
> digital light display promoted by Samsung and a few brands. LCD,
> liquid crystal display is on panels. I have a 5" color lcd tv that
> runs on batteries with no heat.

Direct-view LCDs don't have "light bulbs", but they do have backlights
(something like cold-cathode flourescents on HDTV-sized displays).

Rear-projections LCDs *do* have "light bulbs" that generate a bit of heat.
They work by using a relatively small LCD panel and shining the light
through it and projecting the result onto a larger screen.

--
Jeff Rife | "What's goin' on down here?"
SPAM bait: | "Oh, we're playing house."
AskDOJ@usdoj.gov | "But, that boy is all tied up."
uce@ftc.gov | "...Roman Polanski's house."
| -- Lois and Stewie Griffin, "Family Guy"
Anonymous
July 13, 2004 6:28:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>Types of sets:

Thanks Jeff!

That was a good analogy!
Anonymous
July 14, 2004 3:55:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote in message news:<ee67c74a.0407131121.679455ad@posting.google.com>...
> Many projection TVs have a tappered chassis, i.e. the rear end is
> much smaller than the screen in front. If you don't really need to
> have the TV sit "inside" this hole, you can consider the option of
> only pushing the TV's butt into the hole. Then you may be able to buy
> a much bigger TV yet still utilizing the hole.
>
>
> "sundog" <sundog@mountaindogs.net> wrote in message news:<ccuebs$tft$1@news.xmission.com>...
> > I have only one place for a TV in my home. It has a cabinet built into a
> > large stone fireplace area, the opening is 34 inches wide. So that's it, I
> > need to stick with a smaller set. Sony, Toshiba have sets which will just
> > fit in the opening. I can get a tube set for about 1200 or an LCD for 3000.
> > I can afford either.
> >
> > My question is this is there an advantage to one or the other? The both
> > look great in the store.
> >
> > The glass tube sets are 1080i is this an advantage?
> >
> > Which unit is most likely to last the longest?
> >
> > Plasma is out since my home is at 8000 feet. The only problem with the tube
> > sets that I can see is that they weigh well over 100 pounds.

A conventional 27" Philips CRT set, as sold at Costco, weights 125
lbs. This kind of info can usually be found at manufacturer's web
sites. When you get to 30" sets and greater you need some muscle
available.
Other than the problems already noted, the LCD et al displays may have
less resolution than a CRT. By that I mean how many bits go into each
pixel. With 8 bits, the gray scale near black suffers a lot. If you
can turn off the color and look at the image, that is the best
subjective test for any display. Some will look very harsh indeed and
totally lack details in the darker parts of the picture.
I had to deal with graphic artists at a TV station and we'd bring in
monitors to test. They'd be three feet from a CRT all day long so they
were very particular. Usually the CRTs with the best gray scale
linearity (black to white smoothness) were what they wanted.
Roy547@msn.com
Anonymous
July 14, 2004 5:34:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

200-300 Watts.

"sundog" <sundog@mountaindogs.net> wrote in message
news:ccusnt$9jc$1@news.xmission.com...
> I looked at the Toshiba web site for information regarding power usage
for
> their 30 inch HDTV direct view set but, they don't list the power
> consumption. How many watts are we talking about?
>
> "RichieP" <rpadinDELETETHIS@satx.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:brCIc.22223$857.18049@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> > You might also consider the heat that the set will generate.
> >
> > RichieP
>
>
>
!