tube or projection

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I am in the market for an HDTV and wanted to know if I should get a 34 inch
wide screen, 36 inch square screen, or a projection TV (which would be about
44 inches).

Also, which brand? For projection I was thinking Mitsubishi...that was
recommended by 2 salesmen at best buy. Someone told me I should go an
authorized Mitsu dealer instead of BB. Any thoughts?? Consumer reports
gave top ratings to a Toshiba model that is on clearance due to being
discontinued. I know Toshiba makes great TV's, too.

Thanks,

Eddie G
7 answers Last reply
More about tube projection
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Eddie G" <mickeddie at comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:AZKdnd42bZ8x3m7dRVn-uA@comcast.com...
    > I am in the market for an HDTV and wanted to know if I should get a 34
    inch
    > wide screen, 36 inch square screen, or a projection TV (which would be
    about
    > 44 inches).
    >
    > Also, which brand? For projection I was thinking Mitsubishi...that was
    > recommended by 2 salesmen at best buy. Someone told me I should go an
    > authorized Mitsu dealer instead of BB. Any thoughts?? Consumer reports
    > gave top ratings to a Toshiba model that is on clearance due to being
    > discontinued. I know Toshiba makes great TV's, too.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Eddie G
    >
    >
    You may want to base it on where it's going. For HD you could look for 1.5 x
    size(diagonal) for the minimum viewing distance. for non HD material 2x is
    considered normal distance.

    So, for the 44" you should sit at least 7 feet away from the screen. for 2x
    distance.

    I personally use about 1.7 for my setup, 14ft distance for a 100" screen.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Do you know a 34" widescreen is very small compared to a 36" square TV
    because the way the screen size is measured diagonally? They probably
    give you the same width on the outside. But the widescreen probably
    only give you half the screen area compare to the square TV when you
    watch SD programmings. It seems odd to me that you mentioned two TVs
    with such big size difference in the same sentence.

    Depending on the size you choose, any tube bigger than 36" is too
    heavy. It hurts your back if you need to move it. It may fall down
    during an earthquake and crush some kids. The thickness of the tube
    TV is an important consideration if you don't have a big room. Some
    of the rear projection TV in the 40+" size can be around one foot in
    thickness. It is amazing how much space you save in your room with a
    thin TV.

    If you plan to go HD, of course buy widescreen. A widescreen
    maximizes the HD viewing, and give decent 4x3 viewing. On the
    contrary, a square TV minimizes the HD experience and at the same time
    exaggerates the interior SD. You want the picture to be big when the
    picture is in high resolution, you don't really want to blow up a low
    resolution picture real big to see all the flaws of NTSC. Remember
    the quality of the picture is more important than the size of the
    picture. You are supposed to highlight the good and hide the bad, not
    the reverse. The only advantage of square TV is that you may get a
    better deal because it is the opposite trend.

    For projection TV, you need to compare the technology behind the
    screen. CRT based, LCD based and DLP, front or rear projection, each
    has its pros and cons. Screen burn-in is also an important
    consideration when you choose the technology. CRT based projection is
    prone to burn-in, but LCD projection is prone to dead pixels over
    time, DLP projection has rainbow problem or broken color wheel problem
    for the low end, but the 3 chips DLP can be very expensive. If you
    have a lot of money to spend a highend 3 chips DLP projection TV is
    the best TV you can buy IMHO. You need to really sit down to see what
    you like better.

    When comparing brands, you need to see how well the TV show HD
    pictures. Also you need to see how well it plays regular NTSC
    broadcast and DVD source too. An HD-ready TV with a good line doubler
    will give very nice pictures for low definition source. How many
    inputs at the back of the TV is also important to some people.

    Good luck in choosing.

    "Eddie G" <mickeddie at comcast.net> wrote in message news:<AZKdnd42bZ8x3m7dRVn-uA@comcast.com>...
    > I am in the market for an HDTV and wanted to know if I should get a 34 inch
    > wide screen, 36 inch square screen, or a projection TV (which would be about
    > 44 inches).
    >
    > Also, which brand? For projection I was thinking Mitsubishi...that was
    > recommended by 2 salesmen at best buy. Someone told me I should go an
    > authorized Mitsu dealer instead of BB. Any thoughts?? Consumer reports
    > gave top ratings to a Toshiba model that is on clearance due to being
    > discontinued. I know Toshiba makes great TV's, too.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Eddie G
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Beside the distances, the room overall should come into play. We switched
    sets from a Hitachi 48" Rear Projections to the Dish Network 34" HDTV Tube
    set (900.00 gets you a 34" HDTV widescreen set, HDTV receiver, professional
    set up). Our room was well lit with constant sun and the projection screen
    was to low on light level so we switched to the tube and the picture is
    fabulous.
    Think of the room and the lighting situation and then make your decision
    "jb" <sniffinpoprocksReMoVe@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:5HOIc.19648560$Of.3262307@news.easynews.com...
    >
    > "Eddie G" <mickeddie at comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:AZKdnd42bZ8x3m7dRVn-uA@comcast.com...
    > > I am in the market for an HDTV and wanted to know if I should get a 34
    > inch
    > > wide screen, 36 inch square screen, or a projection TV (which would be
    > about
    > > 44 inches).
    > >
    > > Also, which brand? For projection I was thinking Mitsubishi...that was
    > > recommended by 2 salesmen at best buy. Someone told me I should go an
    > > authorized Mitsu dealer instead of BB. Any thoughts?? Consumer reports
    > > gave top ratings to a Toshiba model that is on clearance due to being
    > > discontinued. I know Toshiba makes great TV's, too.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Eddie G
    > >
    > >
    > You may want to base it on where it's going. For HD you could look for 1.5
    x
    > size(diagonal) for the minimum viewing distance. for non HD material 2x
    is
    > considered normal distance.
    >
    > So, for the 44" you should sit at least 7 feet away from the screen. for
    2x
    > distance.
    >
    > I personally use about 1.7 for my setup, 14ft distance for a 100" screen.
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "eric" <eric.pelser@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:xBRIc.39170$Xb4.23898@nwrdny02.gnilink.net...
    > Beside the distances, the room overall should come into play. We
    switched
    > sets from a Hitachi 48" Rear Projections to the Dish Network 34" HDTV Tube
    > set (900.00 gets you a 34" HDTV widescreen set, HDTV receiver,
    professional
    > set up). Our room was well lit with constant sun and the projection
    screen
    > was to low on light level so we switched to the tube and the picture is
    > fabulous.
    > Think of the room and the lighting situation and then make your decision

    > > > Also, which brand? For projection I was thinking Mitsubishi...that
    was
    > > > recommended by 2 salesmen at best buy. Someone told me I should go an
    > > > authorized Mitsu dealer instead of BB. Any thoughts?? Consumer
    reports
    > > > gave top ratings to a Toshiba model that is on clearance due to being
    > > > discontinued. I know Toshiba makes great TV's, too.
    > > >
    > > You may want to base it on where it's going. For HD you could look for
    1.5
    > >x size(diagonal) for the minimum viewing distance. for non HD material
    2x
    > >is considered normal distance.
    > >
    > > So, for the 44" you should sit at least 7 feet away from the screen. for
    > >2x distance.

    I purchased a 55" AKAI (low end Samsung) PT5598HDIX at SAMs for $1290. It's
    a two tuner HD ready.
    Great picture. I have CATV on Ant A and ANT on Ant B. Local HD reception
    is on Ant B
    Drawbacks:
    1) 3 month warranty instead of the 1 year with Samsung, Hitachi, MGA,
    Toshiba
    2) The audio out is Monitor only so I can't control the volume with the TV
    remote, have to use my stereo remote.
    3) It's BIG. Though the tubes being in front of the boards is good (no worry
    about coolant leaks)
    4) when using the PIP chup chdn while in ant mode it won't go above ch 69
    even though PIP source Ant A has
    CATV to ch 125
    5) Drawback with all HD tv's I've seen: There are two audio outs; Dolby
    digital which only works when a dolby digital signal is received (HD) and
    audio out. When you switch to a HD channel you have to switch your receiver
    to the optical (digital input) and when you go to a standard NTSC channel
    the sound cuts out so you have to switch to analog input.

    My guess is that the TV can faithfully reproduce close to the 2 million of
    the 3 million that HD allows. Focus is not as good as the LCD projection or
    Light processing TV's (990K pixals) but the resolvable pixal size is
    smaller.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote in message news:<ee67c74a.0407131053.14ec5e7b@posting.google.com>...
    > Do you know a 34" widescreen is very small compared to a 36" square TV
    > because the way the screen size is measured diagonally? They probably
    > give you the same width on the outside. But the widescreen probably
    > only give you half the screen area compare to the square TV when you
    > watch SD programmings. It seems odd to me that you mentioned two TVs
    > with such big size difference in the same sentence.

    I know...I also read that a 36 inch displaying in 16:9 gives you 33"
    on the screen, so square box is definitly out.

    > If you plan to go HD, of course buy widescreen. A widescreen
    > maximizes the HD viewing, and give decent 4x3 viewing. On the
    > contrary, a square TV minimizes the HD experience and at the same time
    > exaggerates the interior SD. You want the picture to be big when the
    > picture is in high resolution, you don't really want to blow up a low
    > resolution picture real big to see all the flaws of NTSC. Remember
    > the quality of the picture is more important than the size of the
    > picture. You are supposed to highlight the good and hide the bad, not
    > the reverse. The only advantage of square TV is that you may get a
    > better deal because it is the opposite trend.
    >
    > For projection TV, you need to compare the technology behind the
    > screen. CRT based, LCD based and DLP, front or rear projection, each
    > has its pros and cons. Screen burn-in is also an important
    > consideration when you choose the technology. CRT based projection is
    > prone to burn-in, but LCD projection is prone to dead pixels over
    > time, DLP projection has rainbow problem or broken color wheel problem
    > for the low end, but the 3 chips DLP can be very expensive. If you
    > have a lot of money to spend a highend 3 chips DLP projection TV is
    > the best TV you can buy IMHO. You need to really sit down to see what
    > you like better.

    I would be looking at rear projection CRT as that is in my budget.

    So now I ask, which manufacturer makes the best rear projection CRT
    HDTV? Also, which models are recommended? I've found that just
    because the sony KV34HS510 got great reviews, a different model is not
    as good as, say, a toshiba.

    Thanks!!

    Eddie G
  6. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote in message news:<ee67c74a.0407131053.14ec5e7b@posting.google.com>...
    > Do you know a 34" widescreen is very small compared to a 36" square TV
    > because the way the screen size is measured diagonally? They probably
    > give you the same width on the outside. But the widescreen probably
    > only give you half the screen area compare to the square TV when you
    > watch SD programmings. It seems odd to me that you mentioned two TVs
    > with such big size difference in the same sentence.

    I know...I also read that a 36 inch displaying in 16:9 gives you 33"
    on the screen, so square box is definitly out.

    > If you plan to go HD, of course buy widescreen. A widescreen
    > maximizes the HD viewing, and give decent 4x3 viewing. On the
    > contrary, a square TV minimizes the HD experience and at the same time
    > exaggerates the interior SD. You want the picture to be big when the
    > picture is in high resolution, you don't really want to blow up a low
    > resolution picture real big to see all the flaws of NTSC. Remember
    > the quality of the picture is more important than the size of the
    > picture. You are supposed to highlight the good and hide the bad, not
    > the reverse. The only advantage of square TV is that you may get a
    > better deal because it is the opposite trend.
    >
    > For projection TV, you need to compare the technology behind the
    > screen. CRT based, LCD based and DLP, front or rear projection, each
    > has its pros and cons. Screen burn-in is also an important
    > consideration when you choose the technology. CRT based projection is
    > prone to burn-in, but LCD projection is prone to dead pixels over
    > time, DLP projection has rainbow problem or broken color wheel problem
    > for the low end, but the 3 chips DLP can be very expensive. If you
    > have a lot of money to spend a highend 3 chips DLP projection TV is
    > the best TV you can buy IMHO. You need to really sit down to see what
    > you like better.

    I would be looking at rear projection CRT as that is in my budget.

    So now I ask, which manufacturer makes the best rear projection CRT
    HDTV? Also, which models are recommended? I've found that just
    because the sony KV34HS510 got great reviews, a different sony model
    is not as good as, say, a toshiba.

    Thanks!!

    Eddie G
  7. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    The answer is Hitachi. I did a lot of research before buying my Hitachi
    RPTV and the conclusion was that Hitachi is pretty much the best. They
    developed their own technology and it's mature, and it's even used by other
    manufacturers. When I bought my set I went to a smaller local business to
    make the purchase because of after sales service. When I went into their
    showroom I discovered that they only carried two brands of RPTV's, Hitachi
    and Sony. The salesman told me that they carry those models because of
    their quality and little or no after sales service is required which is good
    for their bottom line. Sounded good to me. I've had the set for a year now
    and have no complaints.

    JK

    "Eddie G" <mickeddie@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:6799ea2c.0407131406.2585a88f@posting.google.com...
    > caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote in message
    news:<ee67c74a.0407131053.14ec5e7b@posting.google.com>...
    > > Do you know a 34" widescreen is very small compared to a 36" square TV
    > > because the way the screen size is measured diagonally? They probably
    > > give you the same width on the outside. But the widescreen probably
    > > only give you half the screen area compare to the square TV when you
    > > watch SD programmings. It seems odd to me that you mentioned two TVs
    > > with such big size difference in the same sentence.
    >
    > I know...I also read that a 36 inch displaying in 16:9 gives you 33"
    > on the screen, so square box is definitly out.
    >
    > > If you plan to go HD, of course buy widescreen. A widescreen
    > > maximizes the HD viewing, and give decent 4x3 viewing. On the
    > > contrary, a square TV minimizes the HD experience and at the same time
    > > exaggerates the interior SD. You want the picture to be big when the
    > > picture is in high resolution, you don't really want to blow up a low
    > > resolution picture real big to see all the flaws of NTSC. Remember
    > > the quality of the picture is more important than the size of the
    > > picture. You are supposed to highlight the good and hide the bad, not
    > > the reverse. The only advantage of square TV is that you may get a
    > > better deal because it is the opposite trend.
    > >
    > > For projection TV, you need to compare the technology behind the
    > > screen. CRT based, LCD based and DLP, front or rear projection, each
    > > has its pros and cons. Screen burn-in is also an important
    > > consideration when you choose the technology. CRT based projection is
    > > prone to burn-in, but LCD projection is prone to dead pixels over
    > > time, DLP projection has rainbow problem or broken color wheel problem
    > > for the low end, but the 3 chips DLP can be very expensive. If you
    > > have a lot of money to spend a highend 3 chips DLP projection TV is
    > > the best TV you can buy IMHO. You need to really sit down to see what
    > > you like better.
    >
    > I would be looking at rear projection CRT as that is in my budget.
    >
    > So now I ask, which manufacturer makes the best rear projection CRT
    > HDTV? Also, which models are recommended? I've found that just
    > because the sony KV34HS510 got great reviews, a different sony model
    > is not as good as, say, a toshiba.
    >
    > Thanks!!
    >
    > Eddie G
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