RAID for performance? Any use it?

This is the MB I am getting
http://www.msi.com.tw/program/products/mainboard/mbd/pro_mbd_detail.php?UID=737

It supports RAID - SATA II 1~4 supports RAID 0, 1 and 0+1 mode by AMD® SB600

I have 2 Raptor 70gig 10k harddrives.
My original plan was 1 for WinXP and the second for the program apps
There will be NO data storage on these drives.

I am working on setting up internal/external storage for my data (redundant)

Think it is better to have WinXP, Programs and swap files on separate disk?
Or create RAID and have it all together.
This is strictly for performance...

Any suggestions?
13 answers Last reply
More about raid performance
  1. you wont benefit much from going with raid 0 unless youre dealing with either editing large audio or video files, or making large sized data transfers, because of the increased sequential transfer rates that raid 0 brings... optimally, youll see up to around 15% performance boost in those situations... for most other situations, youll see a fraction of that performance increase (excluding benchmarks, and windows boot times)

    for game loading times, youll see a very nominal ~1 second improvement on average for the majority of games (google for something like 'raid 0 game load time' and you should see quite a few reviews and benchmarks come up)

    its probably better just to go with 2 seperate drives, one for your main os and application data, the other to seperate the reads and writes between drives (os pagefile, scrap file for photoshop, internet cache, another operating system, etc)

    even though no critical data is being stored on either drive, its always a good idea to have at least some form of back up, especially in the case of overclocking... OCing can cause data corruption on a hdd
  2. I will be doing large file transfers and video editing...

    Maybe I should do this:
    36gb raptor for Windows
    2X 70gp raptor for programs and the video files that I am working on RAID 1


    Then my 400gb drives for data storage and back-up
  3. well, raid 1 wont bring any performance boost, itll just duplicate the data between drives, also cutting the total capacity in half, so instead of 146gb total capacity of raid 0, youll have 74gb total (its just used for data redundancy)

    but, if you go 36gb raptor for windows
    and 2x 74gb raptor in raid 0 for programs and video editing, and the 400gb hdds for data backup like you said, then that sounds good
  4. I goofed, I ment to say RAID 1 for the programs.

    Does it make sense to have the programs and the video to be edited on the same drive?

    Or would it be better to have WinXP and the programs on the 36gb raptor
    Then just the video to be worked on on the RAID 1 raptors?
    Or once the program is loaded, the disk does not matter anymore??


    What about the windows swapfile then?

    36gb raptor - WinXP
    2X70gb raptor RAID 1 - Programs and editing (swapfile also?)
    all other HD for data back-up/redundant (or put the swapfile here)
  5. yeah, i would say to just have all your applications on the 36gb raptor, and the videos being edited saved to, and worked on from the raid 0 array

    the windows swapfile ideally should be placed on a seperate physical hdd than the os, but, i would say in this case, since the majority of your editing is going to occupy the arrays performance, to possibly just leave the pagefile on the 36gb raptor with the os... it might not hurt editing performance really to have the pagefile on the array, but you can try both to see which works out better performancewise

    as far as the size of the pagefile, i believe it should be 1.5 times the amount of system ram that you have installed, with both the minimum and maximum amounts set the same

    edit: yeah, as long as you leave your backup hdds connected, you can put the pagefile on them, since they wont be getting much work on average (im assuming theyre not external hdds, external hdds might not allow fast enough pagefile access, but, again, you can try to see which works best)
  6. I was planning on 400gb internal HD's for back-up
    Then 400gb external HD's for redundant back-up.

    Maybe it would be better to have WinXP, programs and video editing on the same RAID 1??
    I could probably then even swing 3 70gb raptors...for the RAID 1

    I would get rid of the 36gb raptor..

    Could I then install winXP and software and mirror them to the 400gb back-up drive. In case of a system crash?
  7. the only problem i can see with that, is that you would be combining all of the reads and writes together, if everything being actively used is on the same array (OS, applications, pagefile, media editing)... they wont operate independantly in parallel then [on seperate hdds], which i think would hurt performance more than help

    as far as duplicating the os and applications, you can use disk imaging software such as norton ghost, to create an exact duplicate of your os hdd (i havent used it myself, so i dont know much about it really, but, it will allow for an effective backup)... and then you can copy the os image to one of your 400gb hdds

    theres also the alternative, to put your os hdd in a raid 1 array, just for the exact reason, incase a hdd crashes, or data corruption, etc (but that also involves purchasing a second hdd soley for data redundancy)

    but, i think the best idea so far is a 36gb raptor (or 74gb raptor) os and application hdd, a seperate 2x74gb raid 0 array, and the pagefile stored on one of your internal 400gb backup hdd (because everything would be operating in parallel then)

    not to confuse things, but, if you keep your 36gb raptor for the os and applications... you could consider purchasing the third 74 gb raptor to have a 3 raptor raid 0 array, which would boost your raid 0 performance even more

    edit: as far as mirroring the os and application hdd to one of your 400gb hdds (raid 1), it wouldnt work, because you would need identical sized drives (or consequently, if you use 2 different capacity/performance hdd, youll lose the extra capacity of the larger drive, in favor of duplicating the capacity of the smaller drive, 36 gb raptor and 400 gb hdd mirrored in raid 1 = a 36gb raid 1 array... which, would really suck lol)
  8. Is having the OS and applications on the same HD ok?
  9. yep, os and applications on the same hdd is okay, and preferrable too (minimizes complications, as applications will then be associated with the C:\ then by default)
  10. What is the diff between a 2 drive SPAN and a 2 drive RAID? :)
  11. spanning is just spanning the capacity of the drives, with no redundancy or performance enhancements (it would be more beneficial just to have the drives run individually anyhow, jbod for instance)... 2 drive raid is only applicable for raid 0 and raid 1... if you have more than 2 hdds, you can begin to use other raid types, the most well known are raid 1+0 (striping a mirror, 4 drives), raid 0+1 (mirroring a stripe, 4 drives) (i believe thats what they do anyhow, so raid 0+1 i believe would be safer), and raid 5, (striping with parity, 3 drives) if one drive fails, the striped array is still functional, and, of coarse, raid 0 can extend to however many drives your controller supports, or you can do software raid 0 within windows (its the only software raid i can see being worthwhile anyhow)
  12. Quote:
    This is the MB I am getting
    http://www.msi.com.tw/program/products/mainboard/mbd/pro_mbd_detail.php?UID=737

    It supports RAID - SATA II 1~4 supports RAID 0, 1 and 0+1 mode by AMD® SB600

    I have 2 Raptor 70gig 10k harddrives.
    My original plan was 1 for WinXP and the second for the program apps
    There will be NO data storage on these drives.

    I am working on setting up internal/external storage for my data (redundant)

    Think it is better to have WinXP, Programs and swap files on separate disk?
    Or create RAID and have it all together.
    This is strictly for performance...

    Any suggestions?

    Raid 0 essentially makes 2 drives into one and shuffles files between the 2 physical hard drives to boost data tranfer rate because hard drives have a physical limitation as to how much they'll transfer. I've got 3 drives in Raid 0 which gives me triple the transfer rate(180+mb/s) when a single drive will probably top out near 65 mb/s. If one of these drives fail, my data is irretrievable because I'm missing puzzle pieces. It's a big time mistake to have any data stored on a RAID 0 array. However, I have my OS and programs in RAID 0 , and my data stored on single drives, as well as external backups.

    Now if you're still looking to put your OS and your progs on different drives, you can specify that 1 partition be a certain size, andyou can install another partition on whats left over in RAID 0. In other words, instead of partitions side by side, which would essentially be 2 drives, it would be stacked across the 2 drives, like a 2 story house. Intel Matrix Technology allows you to install RAID 0 on one section of a RAID array,and another layout, like RAID 1 or RAID 5 (if you've got 3 or more drives) on the remaining section.

    RAID 0...definitely if it's only OS and programs, stuff you can easily replace/ reinstall. I'm always one of the first players loaded, playing online games. Kinda gives you the advantage of finding appropriate cover or getting to the advantageous spot to pick off the opponent who has no idea you're even there.
  13. also, in the case of raid 0, set the stripe size to the largest you can, especially when used for dealing with large files like you are (eg, 128kb is the largest on some raid controllers, some support larger than that)

    you would set the stripe size according to the greatest amount of files of a certain size, to get optimal performance... if most files are less then 4kb (such as in windows), you would set your stripe size as such... if most of the files youre dealing with are up to 64kb, set the stripe size up to that.. and again, for large media files, set the largest stripe size you can
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