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Audit Deleting of files

Last response: in Windows 2000/NT
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September 9, 2004 5:15:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.security (More info?)

Hello All,
Is there a way which user (logged in on separate ID's) are
deleting files on a particular machine? We have a folder
on public machine that keeps disappearing. We want to
know which logged in user is deleting it. Is there a way
to audit this and find out?

Thanks
Lynn

More about : audit deleting files

Anonymous
a b 8 Security
September 9, 2004 5:24:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.security (More info?)

Opps forgot to say it's on a Windows 2000 professional
machine

>-----Original Message-----
>Hello All,
>Is there a way which user (logged in on separate ID's)
are
>deleting files on a particular machine? We have a folder
>on public machine that keeps disappearing. We want to
>know which logged in user is deleting it. Is there a way
>to audit this and find out?
>
>Thanks
>Lynn
>
>.
>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
September 9, 2004 8:22:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.security (More info?)

Configuring auditing is a two-step process. First you need to configure an
audit policy for your domain:

To configure an audit policy setting for a domain controller, follow these
steps:
1.. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and
then click Active Directory Users and Computers.
2.. Click Advanced Features on the View menu.
3.. Right-click Domain Controllers, and then click Properties.
4.. Click the Group Policy tab, click Default Domain Controller Policy,
and then click Edit.
5.. Click Computer Configuration, double-click Windows Settings,
double-click Security Settings, double-click Local Policies, and then
double-click Audit Policy.
6.. In the right pane, right-click Audit Directory Services Access, and
then click Security.
7.. Click Define These Policy Settings, and then click to select one or
both of the following check boxes:
a.. Success: Click to select this check box to audit successful attempts
for the event category.
b.. Failure: Click to select this check box to audit failed attempts for
the event category.
8.. Right-click any other event category that you want to audit, and then
click Security.
9.. Click OK.
10.. Because the changes that you make to your computer's audit policy
setting take effect only when the policy setting is propagated (or applied)
to your computer, complete one of the following steps to initiate policy
propagation:
a.. Type secedit /refreshpolicy machine_policy at the command prompt,
press ENTER, and then restart the computer.

-or-
b.. Wait for automatic policy propagation, which occurs at regular
intervals that you can configure. By default, policy propagation occurs
every eight hours.
11.. Open the Security log to view logged events. NOTE: If you are either
a domain or an enterprise administrator, you can enable security auditing
for workstations, member servers, and domain controllers remotely.
After that, you need to enable the specific folder(s) that you want to have
audited:

How To: Set, Remove or Change Auditing for a File or Folder:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;301640



--
******************************
Laura E. Hunter - MCSE, MCT, MVP
Replies to newsgroup only


"Lynn" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:92ce01c496a9$cf376510$a301280a@phx.gbl...
> Hello All,
> Is there a way which user (logged in on separate ID's) are
> deleting files on a particular machine? We have a folder
> on public machine that keeps disappearing. We want to
> know which logged in user is deleting it. Is there a way
> to audit this and find out?
>
> Thanks
> Lynn
>
Related resources
September 9, 2004 8:22:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.security (More info?)

Thanks Laura,
I just want to confirm...For a machine that is networked
you can't just do an audit on the machine. There has to
be a domain policy right?

>-----Original Message-----
>Configuring auditing is a two-step process. First you
need to configure an
>audit policy for your domain:
>
>To configure an audit policy setting for a domain
controller, follow these
>steps:
> 1.. Click Start, point to Programs, point to
Administrative Tools, and
>then click Active Directory Users and Computers.
> 2.. Click Advanced Features on the View menu.
> 3.. Right-click Domain Controllers, and then click
Properties.
> 4.. Click the Group Policy tab, click Default Domain
Controller Policy,
>and then click Edit.
> 5.. Click Computer Configuration, double-click Windows
Settings,
>double-click Security Settings, double-click Local
Policies, and then
>double-click Audit Policy.
> 6.. In the right pane, right-click Audit Directory
Services Access, and
>then click Security.
> 7.. Click Define These Policy Settings, and then click
to select one or
>both of the following check boxes:
> a.. Success: Click to select this check box to audit
successful attempts
>for the event category.
> b.. Failure: Click to select this check box to audit
failed attempts for
>the event category.
> 8.. Right-click any other event category that you want
to audit, and then
>click Security.
> 9.. Click OK.
> 10.. Because the changes that you make to your
computer's audit policy
>setting take effect only when the policy setting is
propagated (or applied)
>to your computer, complete one of the following steps to
initiate policy
>propagation:
> a.. Type secedit /refreshpolicy machine_policy at the
command prompt,
>press ENTER, and then restart the computer.
>
> -or-
> b.. Wait for automatic policy propagation, which
occurs at regular
>intervals that you can configure. By default, policy
propagation occurs
>every eight hours.
> 11.. Open the Security log to view logged events. NOTE:
If you are either
>a domain or an enterprise administrator, you can enable
security auditing
>for workstations, member servers, and domain controllers
remotely.
>After that, you need to enable the specific folder(s)
that you want to have
>audited:
>
>How To: Set, Remove or Change Auditing for a File or
Folder:
>
>http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-
US;301640
>
>
>
>--
>******************************
>Laura E. Hunter - MCSE, MCT, MVP
>Replies to newsgroup only
>
>
>"Lynn" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
message
>news:92ce01c496a9$cf376510$a301280a@phx.gbl...
>> Hello All,
>> Is there a way which user (logged in on separate ID's)
are
>> deleting files on a particular machine? We have a
folder
>> on public machine that keeps disappearing. We want to
>> know which logged in user is deleting it. Is there a
way
>> to audit this and find out?
>>
>> Thanks
>> Lynn
>>
>
>
>.
>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
September 10, 2004 4:22:16 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.security (More info?)

Yes you can do it on a single computer but you need to enable auditing of "object
access" . Open Local Security Policy via secpol.msc and configure auditing as Laura
recommended and enable auditing of object access and then audit the parent folder of
the folder that keeps getting deleted. Then you will find Event ID's for 560 and 562
in the security log in Event Viewer when files are being accessed. I suggest that you
audit only the two delete permissions and avoid auditing for access by users or
everyone and use your own group of users if possible to keep the number of events
down. Additionally you should review your ntfs special permissions for apply onto
"this folder only". Maybe too many users have the permissions to delete the folder
and do not need that permission. You will have to view Event ID's 560 and 562 as
pairs by timestamp for meaningful info. --- Steve


"Lynn" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:912e01c496ac$e4283c80$a601280a@phx.gbl...
> Thanks Laura,
> I just want to confirm...For a machine that is networked
> you can't just do an audit on the machine. There has to
> be a domain policy right?
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>Configuring auditing is a two-step process. First you
> need to configure an
>>audit policy for your domain:
>>
>>To configure an audit policy setting for a domain
> controller, follow these
>>steps:
>> 1.. Click Start, point to Programs, point to
> Administrative Tools, and
>>then click Active Directory Users and Computers.
>> 2.. Click Advanced Features on the View menu.
>> 3.. Right-click Domain Controllers, and then click
> Properties.
>> 4.. Click the Group Policy tab, click Default Domain
> Controller Policy,
>>and then click Edit.
>> 5.. Click Computer Configuration, double-click Windows
> Settings,
>>double-click Security Settings, double-click Local
> Policies, and then
>>double-click Audit Policy.
>> 6.. In the right pane, right-click Audit Directory
> Services Access, and
>>then click Security.
>> 7.. Click Define These Policy Settings, and then click
> to select one or
>>both of the following check boxes:
>> a.. Success: Click to select this check box to audit
> successful attempts
>>for the event category.
>> b.. Failure: Click to select this check box to audit
> failed attempts for
>>the event category.
>> 8.. Right-click any other event category that you want
> to audit, and then
>>click Security.
>> 9.. Click OK.
>> 10.. Because the changes that you make to your
> computer's audit policy
>>setting take effect only when the policy setting is
> propagated (or applied)
>>to your computer, complete one of the following steps to
> initiate policy
>>propagation:
>> a.. Type secedit /refreshpolicy machine_policy at the
> command prompt,
>>press ENTER, and then restart the computer.
>>
>> -or-
>> b.. Wait for automatic policy propagation, which
> occurs at regular
>>intervals that you can configure. By default, policy
> propagation occurs
>>every eight hours.
>> 11.. Open the Security log to view logged events. NOTE:
> If you are either
>>a domain or an enterprise administrator, you can enable
> security auditing
>>for workstations, member servers, and domain controllers
> remotely.
>>After that, you need to enable the specific folder(s)
> that you want to have
>>audited:
>>
>>How To: Set, Remove or Change Auditing for a File or
> Folder:
>>
>>http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-
> US;301640
>>
>>
>>
>>--
>>******************************
>>Laura E. Hunter - MCSE, MCT, MVP
>>Replies to newsgroup only
>>
>>
>>"Lynn" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> message
>>news:92ce01c496a9$cf376510$a301280a@phx.gbl...
>>> Hello All,
>>> Is there a way which user (logged in on separate ID's)
> are
>>> deleting files on a particular machine? We have a
> folder
>>> on public machine that keeps disappearing. We want to
>>> know which logged in user is deleting it. Is there a
> way
>>> to audit this and find out?
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Lynn
>>>
>>
>>
>>.
>>
!