Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Questions about the Sony KF60WE610 and HDTV in general

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
July 22, 2004 11:51:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I am very new to the HDTV subject. I have had the Sony Wega 32" flat
screen for about 6 years and am looking to upgrade to the Sony 60" TV
because I have never had a problem with Sony and the picture was very
nice.

I was always under the impression that you had to buy a box-top
converter for your TV if it was "HDTV Ready" and didn't have the
built-in tuner. But the guy at the store said I would be able to rent
the equipment from Comcast (I am in the Philly area). Is this the
equipment that Comcast rents for free with the purchase of a premium
channel (or $6 a month otherwise)? And would I need anything else to
watch DVD's using the higher quality, or does the standard component
input work better on an HDTV? Or is there something better I should
look at, considering I am upgrading my TV and possibly my DVD player
as well.

I have fallen behind the times, because my DirecTV picture was so
great on my SD Sony 32" flat screen for the last 6 years, but I am no
longer there and so in a way, I am starting fresh with a new set up.
My price to spend on everything is around $5000, and I saw that the TV
was $3999 so I figured with the service plan and possible taxes
(unless I cruise down to Delaware) I would hit $5000. Is there any
other TV's out there I should be looking at? I do not really like the
plasmas and am also not interested in another 200 pound TV, as my
current Sony is.

Thanks
Chris
Anonymous
July 22, 2004 10:34:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Chris Fiorentino wrote:
> I am very new to the HDTV subject. I have had the Sony Wega 32" flat
> screen for about 6 years and am looking to upgrade to the Sony 60" TV
> because I have never had a problem with Sony and the picture was very
> nice.
>
> I was always under the impression that you had to buy a box-top
> converter for your TV if it was "HDTV Ready" and didn't have the
> built-in tuner. But the guy at the store said I would be able to rent
> the equipment from Comcast (I am in the Philly area). Is this the
> equipment that Comcast rents for free with the purchase of a premium
> channel (or $6 a month otherwise)? And would I need anything else to
> watch DVD's using the higher quality, or does the standard component
> input work better on an HDTV? Or is there something better I should
> look at, considering I am upgrading my TV and possibly my DVD player
> as well.
>
> I have fallen behind the times, because my DirecTV picture was so
> great on my SD Sony 32" flat screen for the last 6 years, but I am no
> longer there and so in a way, I am starting fresh with a new set up.
> My price to spend on everything is around $5000, and I saw that the TV
> was $3999 so I figured with the service plan and possible taxes
> (unless I cruise down to Delaware) I would hit $5000. Is there any
> other TV's out there I should be looking at? I do not really like the
> plasmas and am also not interested in another 200 pound TV, as my
> current Sony is.
>
> Thanks
> Chris

If you get your HD over cable, you don't need a STB, only the HD cable
box that you'll get (read: rent) from Comcast. To watch your DVDs, just
hook up your component output from your DVD player (if it supports
progressive output) or hook up your S-VHS cable to the TV and let the TV
deinterlace the DVD for you. Either is fine. I've watched many movies
over one of the original Sony DVD players hooked up to your TV with
S-Video and it looks great.

--
David G.
Anonymous
July 23, 2004 9:58:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Seen a few with defective lamps and ballast assemblies resolved during
warranty. Nice set, high quality, good picture with all inputs, HDTV looks
great, normal analog so-so. Like the small footprint and light weight when
compared to RPTV of same size.
"David G." <david_please_dont_email_me@i_hate_spam.com> wrote in message
news:XZednYFNqtth3Z3cRVn-jQ@comcast.com...
> Chris Fiorentino wrote:
> > I am very new to the HDTV subject. I have had the Sony Wega 32" flat
> > screen for about 6 years and am looking to upgrade to the Sony 60" TV
> > because I have never had a problem with Sony and the picture was very
> > nice.
> >
> > I was always under the impression that you had to buy a box-top
> > converter for your TV if it was "HDTV Ready" and didn't have the
> > built-in tuner. But the guy at the store said I would be able to rent
> > the equipment from Comcast (I am in the Philly area). Is this the
> > equipment that Comcast rents for free with the purchase of a premium
> > channel (or $6 a month otherwise)? And would I need anything else to
> > watch DVD's using the higher quality, or does the standard component
> > input work better on an HDTV? Or is there something better I should
> > look at, considering I am upgrading my TV and possibly my DVD player
> > as well.
> >
> > I have fallen behind the times, because my DirecTV picture was so
> > great on my SD Sony 32" flat screen for the last 6 years, but I am no
> > longer there and so in a way, I am starting fresh with a new set up.
> > My price to spend on everything is around $5000, and I saw that the TV
> > was $3999 so I figured with the service plan and possible taxes
> > (unless I cruise down to Delaware) I would hit $5000. Is there any
> > other TV's out there I should be looking at? I do not really like the
> > plasmas and am also not interested in another 200 pound TV, as my
> > current Sony is.
> >
> > Thanks
> > Chris
>
> If you get your HD over cable, you don't need a STB, only the HD cable
> box that you'll get (read: rent) from Comcast. To watch your DVDs, just
> hook up your component output from your DVD player (if it supports
> progressive output) or hook up your S-VHS cable to the TV and let the TV
> deinterlace the DVD for you. Either is fine. I've watched many movies
> over one of the original Sony DVD players hooked up to your TV with
> S-Video and it looks great.
>
> --
> David G.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
July 23, 2004 7:41:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 07:51:01 -0700, Chris Fiorentino wrote:

> I am very new to the HDTV subject. I have had the Sony Wega 32" flat
> screen for about 6 years and am looking to upgrade to the Sony 60" TV
> because I have never had a problem with Sony and the picture was very
> nice.
>
> I was always under the impression that you had to buy a box-top
> converter for your TV if it was "HDTV Ready" and didn't have the
> built-in tuner. But the guy at the store said I would be able to rent
> the equipment from Comcast (I am in the Philly area). Is this the
> equipment that Comcast rents for free with the purchase of a premium
> channel (or $6 a month otherwise)? And would I need anything else to
> watch DVD's using the higher quality, or does the standard component
> input work better on an HDTV? Or is there something better I should
> look at, considering I am upgrading my TV and possibly my DVD player
> as well.
>
> I have fallen behind the times, because my DirecTV picture was so
> great on my SD Sony 32" flat screen for the last 6 years, but I am no
> longer there and so in a way, I am starting fresh with a new set up.
> My price to spend on everything is around $5000, and I saw that the TV
> was $3999 so I figured with the service plan and possible taxes
> (unless I cruise down to Delaware) I would hit $5000. Is there any
> other TV's out there I should be looking at? I do not really like the
> plasmas and am also not interested in another 200 pound TV, as my
> current Sony is.
>
> Thanks
> Chris

I have the 50" and Comcast cable. Comcast charges a little extra for an HD
box, you connect it via a DVI cable (which you have to buy yourself,
~$100) or via a component video cable that Comcast provides. The set is
great on the few HD channels that Comcast has, very good on DVD and some
of the digital but non-HD channels, and lousy on the analog NTSC channels.
The 60" is likely to look even worse on the analog channels. The analog
channels look fine when you use the dual picture mode where you
effectively have two 25" displays side by side. The problem is that NTSC
was never meant to be blown up to the size of a wall, remember it was
designed for 8" TVs.
Anonymous
July 24, 2004 10:41:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Chris Fiorentino" <CFioren317@excite.com> wrote in message
news:D 0a7dad6.0407220651.5886f786@posting.google.com...
> I am very new to the HDTV subject. I have had the Sony Wega 32" flat
> screen for about 6 years and am looking to upgrade to the Sony 60" TV
> because I have never had a problem with Sony and the picture was very
> nice.
>
> I was always under the impression that you had to buy a box-top
> converter for your TV if it was "HDTV Ready" and didn't have the
> built-in tuner. But the guy at the store said I would be able to rent
> the equipment from Comcast (I am in the Philly area). Is this the
> equipment that Comcast rents for free with the purchase of a premium
> channel (or $6 a month otherwise)? And would I need anything else to
> watch DVD's using the higher quality, or does the standard component
> input work better on an HDTV? Or is there something better I should
> look at, considering I am upgrading my TV and possibly my DVD player
> as well.
>
> I have fallen behind the times, because my DirecTV picture was so
> great on my SD Sony 32" flat screen for the last 6 years, but I am no
> longer there and so in a way, I am starting fresh with a new set up.
> My price to spend on everything is around $5000, and I saw that the TV
> was $3999 so I figured with the service plan and possible taxes
> (unless I cruise down to Delaware) I would hit $5000. Is there any
> other TV's out there I should be looking at? I do not really like the
> plasmas and am also not interested in another 200 pound TV, as my
> current Sony is.
>
> Thanks
> Chris

You might want to look at the HLP series from Samsung. That's their latest
Light Processing set. It has more picture
elements than their previous HLN series.
The problem with CRTs and projection that use CRT's is that you have
convergence and focus errors, Phosphor burns and phosphor aging problems.
If you plan on using games or the output of your computer on your TV then
you should go with either LCD projection or Light processing.

I heard that Sony and Samsung reached an agreement about marketing something
Samsung produces and I believe it's their DLP set. So you can probably buy,
next year, a SONY DLP made by Samsung.
!